Author

Gregoris, Nicholas L., S.T.D.
Daughter of Eve Unfallen, The
The Daughter of Eve Unfallen

Focuses on Mary’s cooperation in the work of salvation, with particular attention to what Cardinal Newman has to say on her role of mediation in her Son’s redemptive sacrifice, using his writing and theological principles to help us see he best – the truly traditional way – of both understanding and using these titles. A reference point for all who will in the future write on the subject of Our Lady, especially on her cooperation in the work of redemption.

Grene, Marjorie
Portrait of Aristotle, A
A Portrait of Aristotle

A key introduction to Aristotle, emphasizing the importance of his biological thinking to the study of his thought. Written for students and the general reader with little prior knowledge of Aristotle, this edition features a new preface by Professor Grene.
 

Griffin, James
Wittgenstein's Logical Atomism
Wittgenstein's Logical Atomism

Studies the central topics of Wittgenstein’s philosophy prior to and within the first parts of the Tractatus, covering such subjects as objects, substance, states of affairs, elementary propositions, pictures, and thoughts. He concludes that analysis is reduction to what is basic not in experience but in reference, and argues that the Tractatus is concerned not with problems of knowledge but with problems of sense.

“[F]ull of clear and detailed expositions of obscure passages.” –Philosophical Books

“[L[ively and interesting throughout.” – Max

Grisez, Germain
God? A Philosophical Preface to Faith
God? A Philosophical Preface to Faith

The purpose of this book is to set out an argument for the existence of God, to show how criticism of this argument arising from modern and contemporary philosophy can be met, to explicate how language is used to talk about God, and to show that various existential and analytic attacks upon the meaningfulness of Christian faith are not cogent.

Guerra, Marc D.
Liberating Logos
Liberating Logos

Liberating Logos: Pope Benedict XVI’s September Speeches brings together six important addresses in one volume. The themes of these remarkable speeches are wide ranging: Benedict comments on the denaturing effects of Dehellenization, the true grounds of religious dialogue, the transpolitical and timeless nature of Christianity’s message, the relation of moral and political freedom to truth, the self-limitation of modern reason, and Europe’s and the West’s enduring Christian roots. Each speech offers an unwavering defense of the splendor and majesty of created human reason’s ability to know—and to be liberated by—the uncreated Truth.

Guerra, Marc D., editor
Jerusalem, Athens, and Rome
Jerusalem, Athens, and Rome

James V. Schall, S.J. is unquestionably one of the wisest Catholic political thinkers of our time. For more than forty years, Fr. Schall has been an unabashed practitioner of what he does not hesitate to call Roman Catholic political philosophy. A prolific writer and renowned teacher at Georgetown University, Fr. Schall has helped to educate two generations of Catholic thinkers. The present volume brings together seventeen essays by noted scholars in honor of Fr. Schall. It is a testimony to Fr. Schall’s erudition and influence that the authors of these essays did not have the privilege of directly studying under him. Rather, they are the indirect but grateful beneficiaries of “Another Sort of Learning,” one that Fr. Schall tirelessly defends and practices.

Guminski, Arnold T. and Harrison, Fr. Brian W. O.S.,
Religious Freedom
Religious Freedom

One of the gravest and most divisive issues confronting the Catholic Church in recent decades – a major factor in an ongoing institutionalized rupture between Rome and at least half a million traditionalist Catholics – is the question of whether Vatican II’s Declaration Dignitatis Humanae can be reconciled with traditional Church doctrine on religious liberty.

 

 

Hall, Anne Drury
Where the Muses Still Haunt
Where the Muses Still Haunt

This book is an important companion to the works treated therein, for teachers and students alike. Both need encouragement in the laboring of instruction or reading the impressive classics. Particularly apt is Hall's treatment of the difficulty of teaching Shakespeare. For the not-so-recent university graduate, perhaps this book will bring him once again to wander where the Muses still haunt. Indeed, even the well-read will enjoy Hall's keen interpretation of the glory of these stories. This is a book written by a true teacher. 

Hancock, Curtis L.
Recovering a Catholic Philosophy of Elementary Education
Recovering a Catholic Philosophy of Elementary Education

A much-needed, incisive book that looks at elementary education from a philophic point of view, and recognizes that, in practice, education is replete with unexamined philosophical presuppositions. “. . . [accounts] for these philosophical presuppositions and [explains] the serious problems connected with them, together with a more reasonable and adequate understanding of what it is to educate the human being, from child to adult.” – James V. Schall, S.J., Georgetown University

Hancock, Ralph C.
Calvin and the Foundations of Modern Politics
Calvin and the Foundations of Modern Politics

This work reopens the question of the relation of the Protestant Reformation to the emergence of a distinctively modern view of political activity. Providing a highly original reading of John Calvin’s major work and an examination of some key interpretations of Calvinism, Ralph C. Hancock argues that Calvin should be considered a founder of modern civilization along with such “secular” thinkers as Machiavelli, Hobbes, and Descartes.

Hankey, Wayne J.
Aquinas's Neoplatonism in the Summa Theologiae on God
Aquinas's Neoplatonism in the Summa Theologiae on God

This book rises out of Dr. Wayne Hankey’s 2015 Aquinas Lecture at the University of Dallas. It explains the Neoplatonic structure and doctrine of St. Thomas’s treatment of God in the Summa theologiae with the aim of showing that his doctrine of being is at root both Trinitarian and incarnational.

Hankins, Barry G. and Schmeltekopf, Donald D.
Baylor Project, The
The Baylor Project

[T]he earlier and much-anticipated version [of this book], entitled Baylor Beyond the Crossroads: An Interpretive History, 1985–2005, was in the printing process when its publication was cancelled. The first several hundred copies of the book were then destroyed. The earlier version was cancelled because the new administration at Baylor believed the publication of the book under the Baylor name would unnecessarily involve it, the administration, in the prolonged controversy that had enveloped Baylor at least since the 2001 adoption of Baylor 2012 – Baylor’s sweeping vision to be a Christian research university.

Harris, Roy
Language Connection, The
The Language Connection

Why have philosophers and linguists in the West always failed to agree about language? How can we use language to talk about language? Is the division between the disciplines of philosophy and linguistics artificial?

Harris, Roy, editor
Origin of Language, The
The Origin of Language

Public debate about language in the English-speaking world during the nineteenth-century turned on the issue of how language began. The notion that language was a divine gift to humanity, not shared by lower creatures, was supported by the Biblical accounts of Adam naming the animals and of the Tower of Babel. It was still accepted by leading religious authorities. But this notion was seriously brought into question by the publication of Darwin’s theory of evolution. Those who rejected Darwinism ridiculed all attempts to conjure up language out of primitive calls, grunts, and ejaculations.. On the other side were those who held that it was possible to account for the birth of language rationally as a function of the development of human communicational needs in society.

Harrison, Andrew
Philosophy and the Arts
Philosophy and the Arts

How can pictorial and narrative arts be usefully contrasted and compared? What in principal can be, or cannot be, communicated in such different media? Why does it seem that, at its best, artistic communication goes beyond the limitations of its own medium – seeming to think and to communicate the uncommunicable? Indeed, what kinds of thought are exercised in the pictorial and narrative arts?

Hart, Kevin
Contemplation and Kingdom
Contemplation and Kingdom

This book rises out of Dr. Kevin Hart’s 2020 Aquinas Lecture at the University of Dallas.Contemplation and  Kingdom seeks to retrieve aspects of Richard of St. Victor's treatment of contemplation, principally in De arca mystica, and does so by weighing Thomas Aquinas's reservations about this treatment in the Summa theologiæ. Is Aquinas right to object, as Augustine does in De Doctrina Christiana, that our contemplation should go directly to God and not be stalled in the consideration of the natural world? What relation is there between Jesus's preaching of the Kingdom and the contemplation of God? Is the contemplative life consistent with Jesus's injunction to love both God and neighbor? These are the principal questions considered in the book.

Harvey, John F. OSFS and Bradley, Gerard V.
Same-Sex Attraction
Same-Sex Attraction

This work addresses parents whose children believe themselves to be attracted sexually to persons of the same sex, and it involves many aspects of the complex issues surrounding homosexuality and the homosexual movement. Renowned scholars in scripture, dogmatic and moral theology, philosophy, canon and civil law, pastoral theology, and psychology and psychiatry address the many aspects of the subject with care, sensitivity, and clarity. Although this work is written by Catholics and aimed principally at a Catholic audience, much of what is written is applicable to parents of any religious persuasion.

Heath, Thomas
Mathematics in Aristotle
Mathematics in Aristotle

This is a detailed exposition of Aristotelian mathematics and mathematical terminology. It contains clear translations of all the most important passages on mathematics in the writings of Aristotle, together with explanatory notes and commentary by Heath. Particularly interesting are the discussions of hypothesis and related terms, of Zeno’s paradox, and of the relation of mathematics to other sciences. The book includes a comprehensive index of the passages translated. “The commentary clears up many difficult points and provides a wealth of scholarly information on the history of mathematics and mathematical terminology.” – Martha Kneale, Mind

“The book opens up the whole of Aristotle to mathematicians who have no Greek, and enables them to form a judgement of Aristotle both as a mathematician, and as a mathematical philosopher.” – Philosophy

Heilke, Thomas, and Heyking, John von, edited by
Hunting and Weaving
Hunting and Weaving

The essays in this volume honor the work of political scientist and Eric Voegelin scholar, Barry Cooper, by considering how political philosophy (a form of hunting) and empiricism get “woven” together (to borrow a metaphor from Plato). In other words, they consider how science needs to be conducted if it is to remain true to our commonsense experience of the world and to facilitate political judgment.

Henderson, Harold
Let's Kill Dick and Jane
Let's Kill Dick and Jane

To become lifelong learners, students need to be able to work and play in the world of ideas as easily as they do in the world of objects and feelings. But the culture of American education focuses on drills and projects with no clear connection to this goal.

Henry of Ghent
Henry of Ghent's <em> Summa of Ordinary Questions </em>
Henry of Ghent's Summa of Ordinary Questions

Following the condemnation of 219 propositions in philosophy and theology by Étienne Tempier, bishop of Paris, in 1277, there was a revival of Augustinian thought and a move away from aspects of Aristotelianism that were – rightly or wrongly – condemned as incompatible with the Christian faith. Henry of Ghent was the most important representative of such Neo-Augustinian thought in the late thirteenth century. His Summa, which represents his ordinary lectures at the University of Paris, affords an excellent insight into the character of theology and philosophy in the years after the death of Aquinas. The first article of the Summa, translated here, is devoted to the possibility of human knowledge and provides a sophisticated attempt to combine an Aristotelian empiricism, Platonic exemplarism, and an Augustinian doctrine of divine illumination.

Hildebrand, Dietrich von
Nature of Love, The
The Nature of Love

Early on Dietrich von Hildebrand distinguished himself as a thinker with an unusual understanding of human love. His books in the 1920s on man and woman broke new ground and stirred up fruitful controversy. Toward the end of his life he wrote a foundational book on love,The Nature of Love. He had in fact been preparing all his life to write this work; he was so drawn to the philosophical analysis of love that his students long ago had dubbed him doctor amoris, the doctor of love. This great work, the mature fruit of von Hildebrand’s genius, is now available for the first time in English, ably translated and introduced by the philosopher John F. Crosby, who had been a student of von Hildebrand.

Hosle, Vittorio
Objective Idealism, Ethics, and Politics
Objective Idealism, Ethics, and Politics

Vittorio Hösle, touted as the German philosopher of the coming generation, exhibits his wide range of scholarship in this, his first book published in America.

Hsu, Promise
China's Quest for Liberty
China's Quest for Liberty

China’s Quest for Liberty is a personal story of a young man fully engaged in understanding the world he was born into and working toward making that world into a better and freer place to life. It is about an unexpected journey a Chinese journalist has taken to pursue freedom, involving such diverse fields or disciplines as politics, business, humanities, science and technology, government agencies and non-governmental organizations. Some took place as daily life, and some occurred in detentions or disasters.

Huby, Pamela
Greek Ethics
Greek Ethics

This is a concise and easy-to-read account of the ethical philosophy of the Greeks, from the Sophists to the Stoics. With particular emphasis on Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, the author skillfully traces the themes of law and nature, virtue, knowledge and happiness, and love and friendship, giving a comprehensive account of the meanings the Greeks attached to expressions such as “justice,” “voluntary action,” “virtue,” and “good.” “The story of Greek moral philosophy has been told many times, at varying lengths and different levels, but Mrs Huby has shown that there was room for yet another version.” – Philosophical Quarterly

Hume, David
Four Dissertations
Four Dissertations

In 1756 a volume of Hue's essays entitled Five Dissertations was printed and ready for distribution. The essays included "The Natural History of Religion," "Of the Passions," "Of Tragedy," "Of Suicide," and "Of the Immortality of the Soul." The latter two essays made direct attacks on common religious doctrines by defending a person's moral right to commit suicide and by criticizing the idea of life after death. Early copies were passed around, and someone of influence threatened to prosecute Hume's publisher if the book was distributed as is. The printed copies of Five Dissertations were then physically altered with a new essay, "Of the Standard of Taste" inserted in place of the two removed essays. Hume also took this opportunity to alter two particularly offending paragraphs in the Natural History. The essays were then bound with the new title Four Dissertations and distributed in Jan. 1757.

 

Janowski, Zbigniew
Augustinian-Cartesian Index
Augustinian-Cartesian Index

Since the publication of Etienne Gilson’s magisterial study, La Liberté chez Descartes et la théologie, in 1913, Cartesian scholars have been trying to determine the extent of Augustine’s influence on Descartes. Zbigniew Janowski’s Augustinian-Cartesian Index brings what seems to be a definitive answer. In his Index Janowski shows page by page, in Latin and in the English translation, the passages in the Meditations that find their counterparts in the Augustinian corpus. In his meticulous commentary the author analyzes Augustine’s role in the formation and development of Descartes’s philosophy. There are also two appendixes with borrowings from Thomas Aquinas and Bacon, and a short essay on the role Bacon played in the transformation of Cartesian metaphysics. TheAugustinian-Cartesian Index is a major contribution to the understanding of the origins of modern philosophy and Augustinian tradition in the seventeenth century. It will become a standard reference tool.

Janowski, Zbigniew
How to Read Descartes's <em> Meditations </em>
How to Read Descartes's Meditations

How to Read Descartes's Meditations consists of seven independent studies of Descartes's Meditations. The discussion in each chapter is organized around one problem which either has never or very seldom been explored in Cartesian scholarship. For example, in the study of the Letter to the Sorbonne, Janowski centers his discussion around the decree of the Lateran Council, showing the unorthodox character of Descartes's conception of the soul. Further, in his chapter devoted to the notoriously difficult proof for the existence of God in the Third Meditation, Janowski shows that to understand properly Descartes's explicitly Scholastic proof is to read it as a reformulation of Duns Scotus's own proof. And in the final chapter on the Sixth Meditation, the author shows that Modern (Cartesian) Man – the man whose soul is no longer the Scholastic anima but blood that animates his bones, veins, and muscles - germinated in the writings of Francis Bacon, a predecessor never properly acknowledged by Descartes.

Janowski, Zbigniew
Homo Americanus
Homo Americanus

Janowski all at once brazen and out of bounds states what he calls the obvious and unthinkable truth: In the United States, we are already living in a totalitarian reality. The American citizen, the Homo Americanus, is an ideological being who is no longer good or bad, reasonable or irrational, proper or improper except when measured against the objectives of the dominating egalitarian mentality that American democracy has successfully incubated. American democracy has done what other despotic regimes have likewise achieved––namely, taken hold of the individual and forced him to renounce (or forget) his greatness, pursuit of virtue and his orientation toward history and Tradition.

Janowski, Zbigniew and Duggan, Jacob
John Stuart Mill
John Stuart Mill

This is the second volume, following the well-received edition of Mill’s writing essential to understanding the liberal tradition. His commentary on a full spectrum of issues gives further insight into the strengths and vulnerabilities of liberal democratic theory in practice. Rare and difficult to locate material is here brought to attention and made available. 

Joachim, Harold H.
Descartes's Rules for the Direction of the Mind
Descartes's Rules for the Direction of the Mind

Taken from the original manuscripts of Joachim’s lectures on the Regulae of Descartes, this volume was reconstructed after his death from notes taken by his pupils Errol Harris and John Austin. A critical examination of the main rules for the direction of the mind and the expositions by which Descartes explains them, the work contains commentary on five main topics: the power of knowing, the nature of the intellect, Descartes’s account of induction and deduction, Descartes’s method of analysis and synthesis, and the notice of vera mathesis. Joachim then goes on to criticize Descartes’s method and to expound his own doctrine of philosophical analysis. The last chapter offers his own concrete organic unities in opposition to the Cartesian complex natures. “The reader . . . will be challenged to turn to Descartes and accompany Joachim through the appropriate Rules. This little book should be read by all students of Descartes.” – Mind

John of Saint Thomas
Introduction to the Summa Theologiae of Thomas Aquinas
Introduction to the Summa Theologiae of Thomas Aquinas

John of St. Thomas (John Poinsot) lived from 1584 to 1644 and was one of the luminaries of the Second Scholasticism, which flourished on the Iberian Peninsula at a time when, on the continent, Thomism was virtually eclipsed. In his Cursus Philosophicus, John of St. Thomas provides a remarkable précis of the philosophy that is presupposed by theology. HisCursus Theologicusis a commentary on the Summa Theologiaein the manner of the Master’s exposition of the Sentences of Peter Lombard, that is, the pursuit of the main questions raised by the text rather than a textual commentary. Included in modern editions of theCursus Theologicusare a number of preliminary studies, among them a remarkable analysis of the Summa, part by part, treatise by treatise, in which the exquisite architecture of this masterpiece of Thomas Aquinas is magisterially displayed. This may be read as the explicatio textus, essential for reading the Cursus Theologicus. Readers of Jacques and Raissa Maritain are aware of the central role John of St. Thomas played in their grasp of Aquinas. Indeed, this was true of most of those involved in the Thomistic Revival inaugurated by Leo XIII. This translation of John of St. Thomas’s Introduction as it appears in the Solesmes edition makes available to a new generation of students of Thomas a precious handbook and guide to the Summa.

Johnson, Peter
R. G. Collingwood
R. G. Collingwood

Why should modern philosophers read the works of R. G. Collingwood? His ideas are often thought difficult to locate the main lines of development taken by twentieth- century philosophy. Some have read Collingwood as anticipating the later Wittgenstein; others have concentrated exclusively on the internal coherence of his thought. This work aims to introduce Collingwood to contemporary students of philosophy through direct engagement with his arguments. It is a conversation with Collingwood that takes as its subject matter the topics that interested him – philosophy and method, the historical imagination, art and expression, action, metaphysics and life – and which still preoccupy us today.

Jones, David Alpert, O.P.
Organ Transplants and the Definition of Death
Organ Transplants and the Definition of Death

A Brief History of Transplant Medicine: Problems of rejection. Breakthrough. Moral Issues in Organ Transplantation: Receiving an organ. Taking organs from dead bodies. Taking organs from living donors. Finding new sources of organs. Sharing out organs and sharing out costs. Thinking about the transplant movement as a whole. The Official Teaching of the Catholic Church: Before the era of organ transplantation. Pope Pius XII. Dignity of the Body. Pope John Paul II. Donations as free gift. Abuses. The Catechism of the Catholic Church. Recent teaching. Definition of death. Weighing up the Arguments: The principle of totality. Having the right attitudes. Brain death. Organ donation as Christian selfgiving. Tentative Conclusions and Unresolved Questions. Further Reading. Glossary.

Jones, E. Michael
Is Notre Dame Still Catholic?
Is Notre Dame Still Catholic?

On March 25, 2009, Notre Dame was embroiled in the biggest controversy to hit the campus since the performance of The Vagina Monologues. A few days earlier, Notre Dame president John Jenkins, C.S.C., had announced that the university planned to give President Barack Obama an honorary doctorate. Within hours of the announcement a storm of protest erupted which showed no sign of dying down any time soon. Citing the statement of the U.S. Catholic Bishops in 2004, “The Catholic community and Catholic institutions should not honor those who act in defiance of our fundamental moral principles. They should not be given awards, honors or platforms which would suggest support for their actions,” the ordinary of the Diocese of Fort Wayne-South Bend, John M. D’Arcy, announced that, for the first time in 25 years, he would not be attending graduation ceremonies at Notre Dame, because “President Obama has recently affirmed, and has now placed in public policy, his long stated unwillingness to hold human life as sacred.”

Jones, E. Michael
Ballet Parking
Ballet Parking

The Nutcracker began as a German fairy tale. It then became a Russian ballet, and now, in its latest incarnation, it has become an American ritual. Every year mothers from the suburbs surrounding South Bend, Indiana, set out in their vans and SUVs to slay the rat king in a military campaign against the rats and everything they symbolize. Every year they volunteer their little boys and girls as soldiers in the culture wars so that they can defeat the rats of appetite, disorder, and chaos by wielding the weapons of truth, beauty, and grace. The Nutcracker is the 21st-century version of the Children’s Crusade.

Journet, Charles Cardinal
Mass, The
The Mass

Charles Journet, the great Swiss theologian and cardinal of the Church, first wrote this work on the Mass over 40 years ago; yet his ever-ancient-ever-new insights into the sacrificial nature of the Mass are most needed today, when this aspect of the sacrament is so often misunderstood or neglected.

Kaczor, Christopher
Gospel of Happiness, The
Gospel of Happiness, The

Just as Aristotelian metaphysics provided a new basis for the natural theology of Aquinas’s time, so too, positive psychology provides a basis for a natural moral theology in our own time. This book marshals the empirically verifiable findings of positive psychology that show the wisdom of the Christian tradition. Christian warnings about the dangers of greed, coveting a neighbor’s goods (social comparison), and pride find an empirical verification. Likewise, positive psychology vindicates the wisdom of Christian teaching on the importance of forgiveness, of gratitude, of humility, and of serving one’s neighbor. Moreover, positive psychology also can be a service to Christian believers by helping them in their struggles with willpower, by providing new motivations for prayer, and by helping them identify their signature strengths. Finally, this book argues, in a variety of ways, that it is folly to think that even the best of psychology can serve as a replacement for Christianity.

Kaczor, Christopher, editor
O Rare Ralph McInerny
O Rare Ralph McInerny

During more than a half century at the University of Notre Dame, Dr. Ralph McInerny’s legendary achievements include writing more than 50 non-fiction books in philosophy, medieval studies, and theology, as well as more than 90 novels, including the Father Dowling Murder Mystery series. This volume offers personal reflections on the man himself and what he meant to so many over his rich life of teaching, writing, and contributing to the life of the mind. Alasdair MacIntyre, Cardinal Francis George, Ralph’s brother D.Q. McInerny, Michael Novak, John Haldane, Joseph Bottum, Thomas De Konick, Jude P. Dougherty, Gerard V. Bradley, Fr. Marvin O’Connell, and many others (see below) aim to capture some of the ‘more’ that was McInerny, a more that cannot be captured by any curriculum vitae, even one as impressive as Ralph’s. The stories, anecdotes, and reflections in this volume give us various snapshots of the man that cannot be found in news accounts, press releases, or academic evaluations. A person as great as Ralph should not live merely in memory, so some record such as this volume written his friends, colleagues, and former students becomes appropriate.

Kelly, George A.
Second Spring of the Church in America, The
The Second Spring of the Church in America

Monsignor George Kelly, one of the great churchmen of our time, turns a keen but loving eye on the contemporary Church in this magnificent new book. On several notable occasions in the past, Monsignor Kelly has set before his readers the status quo of Roman Catholicism in the United States. But in this new book, he combines as never before an unclouded vision of unfortunate aspects of the contemporary Church with a robust optimism concerning what lies ahead.

Kemp, John
Philosophy of Kant, The
The Philosophy of Kant

“This brief and lucid synopsis of Kant’s critical philosophy is written in the hope that it will make reading of Kant ‘a little easier’ – a hope which is not disappointed. The book expounds the principal theses of Kant’s theoretical and practical philosophy and of his philosophy of beauty and purpose. Although Professor Kemp’s main aim is with the exposition of Kant’s meaning, he also clearly indicates on the one hand the extent of Kant’s originality, on the other the extent of his dependence on his philosophical predecessors and the science and morality of his day.” – Times Literary Supplement

Kenny, Anthony
Descartes
Descartes

“Kenny’s Descartes is a notably good and important book. He says it is ‘designed to help undergraduate and graduate students in understanding Descartes’ philosophy.’ The book concentrates on Descartes’ epistemology, metaphysics, and philosophy of mind; but the penultimate chapter, on Matter and Motion, contains a succinct account of Descartes’ mechanism and a critique of the a priori side of his natural philosophy.” – The Philosophical Quarterly

Kimball, Roger
Fortunes of Permanence, The
The Fortunes of Permanence

“Cultural instructions.” Everyone who has handled a package of seedlings has encountered that enigmatic advisory. This much water and that much sun, certain tips about fertilizer, soil, and drainage. Planting one sort of flower nearby keeps the bugs away but proximity to another sort makes bad things happen. Young shoots might need stakes, and watch out for beetles, weeds, and unseasonable frosts. It’s a complicated business.

Kluetgen, Josef, S.J.
Pre-Modern Philosophy Defended
Pre-Modern Philosophy Defended

“Pre-modern philosophy” means the line of reflection that started with Plato andvAristotle, passed through Augustine and Boethius, and reached its acme in Aquinas, Scotus, and Suarez. The whole line was harshly judged by Descartes, then mocked by the empiricsts of the 18th Century. Why, then, did Pope Leo XII make a determined effort to revive it? And, more importantly, why was the revival a stunning success by the middle of the 20th Century?

Kojève, Alexandre
Concept, Time, and Discourse, The
The Concept, Time, and Discourse

Alexandre Kojève (1902–1968) is most widely known in America for his provocative assertion that history is at its end, that is, its completion. In the “practical” sense, this means that the process of historical development can at last be seen (if from a distance) as the realization of the Marxist “universal and homogeneous state.” However, Kojève claimed as well that the history of philosophical thinking had also reached its goal in the transformation of philosophy, as the “love of wisdom” (or the unsatisfied quest for comprehensive knowledge), into that very Wisdom itself and had done so in the most essential respects in the philosophy of Hegel.

Kojève, Alexandre
Idea of Determinism, The
The Idea of Determinism

The previous volume of Alexandre Kojève’s (1902–1968) work published by St. Augustine’s Press, The Concept, Time and Discourse (2019), was the introduction to an unfinished magnum opus through which Kojève intended to effectively update Hegelian philosophy. For Kojève, Hegel provides the completion of philosophy’s historical development, with the exception of what Kojève deems an inadequate philosophy of nature. The translation of The Idea of Determinism offers insight into what shape Kojève’s “update” to Hegelian philosophy of nature may have taken.

Kolakowski, Leszek
Husserl and the Search for Certitude
Husserl and the Search for Certitude

“[Husserl] better than anybody, compelled us to realize the painful dilemma of  knowledge: either consistent empiricism, with its relativistic, skeptical results (a standpoint which many regard discouraging, inadmissible, and in fact ruinous for culture) or transcendental dogmatism, which cannot really justify itself and remains in the end an arbitrary decision. I have to admit that although ultimate certitude is a goal that cannot be attained within the rationalist framework, our culture would be poor and miserable without people who keep trying to reach this goal, and it hardly could survive when left entirely in the hands of the skeptics.” – From the author’s conclusion.

Kolakowski, Leszek
Religion If There Is No God . . .
Religion If There Is No God . . .

Leszek Kolakowski discusses, in a highly original way, the arguments for and against the existence of God as they have been conducted through the ages. He examines the critiques of religious belief, from the Epicureans through Nietzsche to contemporary anthropological inquiry, the assumptions that underlie them, and the counter-arguments of such apologists as Descartes, Leibniz, and Pascal.

Kolakowski, Leszek
Two Eyes of Spinoza, The
The Two Eyes of Spinoza

Known in the English-speaking world mainly as the author of Main Currents of Marxism (1976), and in France as the author of the monumental study Chrétiens sans Eglise (1966), in his Two Eyes of Spinoza and Other Essays on Philosophers Leszek Kolakowski offers the English-speaking reader for the first time a significant selection of his early writings. Originally written in Polish, German, and French, this collection is his first book ever in English on seventeenth-century thought, which subject he has been writing on since “Individual and Infinity: Freedom and Antinomies of Freedom in the Philosophy of Spinoza” was published in 1957. Included in Two Eyes of Spinoza are essays on “The Philosophical Role of the Reformation” and the “Mystical Heresy,” on Uriel da Costa, Spinoza, Gassendi, and Pierre Bayle, but also on Freud, Marx, Avenarius, and Heidegger. Also included is Kolakowski’s well-known essay “The Priest and the Jester,” in which he considers the question of the theological heritage in contemporary thought.

Kolakowski, Leszek
Bergson
Bergson

Kolakowski shows how Henri Bergson sought to reconcile Darwin’s theory with his own beliefs about the nature of the universe. Bergson believed that time could be thought of in two different ways: as an abstract measuring device used for practical purposes, or as durée, the “real” time we actually experience. He also held that all matter is propelled by an internal élan vital, or life-drive, and that the life of the universe is constantly creative and unpredictable. On the basis of these ideas he constructed a system of thought that embraced his views on memory, matter, consciousness, movement, religious morality, and the nature of laughter. His pantheistic and dynamic vision of the universe, which emerged at a time of crisis in Western intellectual life, was symptomatic of the struggle between a rigid scientific determinism and the Christian tradition of a divine creation.