Forthcoming Books

After Pandemic, After Modernity
After Pandemic, After Modernity

 The global pandemic has levied a heavy toll on humanity, but in its wake appears a great opportunity. Amidst what he calls a crisis of modernity, Giulio Maspero points to a phenomenon that can be seen in plain sight. "The absence of personal relationships highlighted by the health crisis exposes the consequences of the modern matrix, which, having lost its Christian element, now risks transforming itself into a digital matrix, substantially configuring itself as a technognosis."  

The Ancient City
Ancient City, The

The importance of engaging the problems of contemporary political theory has brought us to an unprecedented reliance on the historical commentary already provided by giants like Alexis de Tocqueville and Edmund Burke. Among these is also the less often noted Numa Denis Fustel de Coulanges and his landmark work, The Ancient City.

Aquinas's Sources
Aquinas's Sources

The twenty-six works contained in this collection comprise some of the best and best-known scholars on the thought of Thomas Aquinas. Readers will find here helpful insights into St. Thomas’s adjudication of various streams in the philosophical and theological traditions. Most pertinent for readers today is the way in which Aquinas integrates faith and reason, resulting in mutual benefit.. 

Cambridge Philosophers

A series of nine major articles by eminent philosophers on the life and work of some of the most important twentiethcentury philosophers at Cambridge. All these essays originally appeared in the journal Philosophy from the Royal Institute of Philosophy.

Contributors include:

Henry Sidgwick by Ross Harrison

A. N. Whitehead by Dorothy Emmet

J. M. E. McTaggart by Peter Geach

Bertrand Russell by Ray Monk

G. E. Moore by Thomas Baldwin

C. D. Broad by Theo Redpath

Ludwig Wittgenstein by G. E. M. Anscombe

F. P. Ramsey by D. H. Mellor

John Wisdom by Ilham Dilman

Communication Culture in a Digital Age
Communication Culture in a Digital Age

Why are human beings so attracted to information and communication technologies? Developments in this field have formed new social networks around these technologies and that seem to compete with pre-existing structures in human lives. Cristian Mendoza and Lluís Clavell confront this phenomenon and its effect on human happiness, but have no desire to condemn the trajectory of human reliance on communication technology. Rather, they see an opportunity to explore human nature at greater depths. Only in this way can our use of technology properly support human activity and not sabotage our grasp of reality.

Declaration of America, The
Declaration of America, The

Richard Ferrier expounds on the basic truth learned from Alan Keyes during work on his political campaign in 1996. "He taught us to see what President Lincoln saw 160 years ago: an American should always take his principles and form his sentiments from those expressed in the Declaration of Independence." Whereas it might seem America is the product of political divorce, the Declaration instead endows our nation with the qualities of a marriage. We are a deliberate union, Ferrier says, and we must strive to live well politically by doing right by the pledge contained in the Declaration.

Devotional Activism
Devotional Activism

The essays take up a variety of episodes from modern European and American history and explore, from various angles, three interrelated themes: 'public religion', and the role of Catholicism as a determined critic of modernity; religion as an impetus for innovation; and the tendency to reduce religion to culture.

End of Liberalism, The
End of Liberalism, The

In the fourth title in the Dissident American Thought Today Series, Chilton Williamson takes on liberalism and reveals the 'faith' of the present Democratic Party as its own cultivated version of absurdity. This 'advanced liberalism' is not the liberalism of Mill, and it certainly no longer is the thinking man's party. If it were once true that conservatism is unimaginative and reactionary, the contrary is the picture of our times. Liberalism now asserts that human nature can and must be perfected but without reference to nature. The age of the expert has been thrust upon the United States with the urgency of technique to be applied to coerce the vision of a perfect society and perfect human beings. 

An Essay on Philosophical Method
Essay on Philosophical Method, An

“My best book in matter; in style, I may call it my only book.” – R. G. Collingwood

The Idea of Determinism
Idea of Determinism, The

The previous volume of Alexandre Kojève’s (1902–1968) work published by St. Augustine’s Press, The Concept, Time and Discourse (2019), was the introduction to an unfinished magnum opus through which Kojève intended to effectively update Hegelian philosophy. For Kojève, Hegel provides the completion of philosophy’s historical development, with the exception of what Kojève deems an inadequate philosophy of nature. The translation of The Idea of Determinism offers insight into what shape Kojève’s “update” to Hegelian philosophy of nature may have taken.

In Fielding's Wake
In Fielding's Wake

In the second volume of The Weight of Words Series, Jeremy Black continues his efforts to present and preserve Britain's literary genius. Its intelligence and enduring influence is in large part reliant on the underlining conservatism that has motivated authors such as Agatha Christie (Black's earlier subject) and Henry Fielding alike.

Is St. Thomas's Aristotelian Philosophy of Nature Obsolete?
Is St. Thomas's Aristotelian Philosophy of Nature Obsolete?

“The Analytic Thomist,” Rob Koons, delivered the 2021 Aquinas Lecture at the University of Dallas. Here he engages the possibility of a bridge between philosophy and metaphysics proper. Koons boldly lays out his position: without Aristotelian metaphysics, there is no Aristotelian philosophy of nature, and there is no philosophy of nature in Aristotle without acknowledging his natural science. His lecture thus challenges Thomists and their respective approaches to hylomorphism and their all too frequent quickness to discard it. (Koon lays down the gauntlet. if one denies hylomorphism there can be no transubstantiation!) 
 

Jacques Maritain and Human Rights
Jacques Maritain and Human Rights

Lorenzini’s work is a formidable contribution to the literature pertaining to the period of post-war thought and Maritain on human rights. In his labors to carefully digest the full span of Maritain’s intellectual trajectory on rights, Lorenzini brings Jacques Maritain alive both as a man of vision but also fervent action, and defends him from critics and historians that accuse him of spurning Church teaching and papal authority. As Lorenzini’s study shows, the human rights of the secular-civic world––whose lineage scholars attribute in large part to Maritain––were always derived from Catholic teaching and intended for use in constructing the truly Christian city.

John of St. Thomas (Poinsot) on Sacred Science
John of St. Thomas (Poinsot) on Sacred Science

This volume offers an English translation of John of St. Thomas’s Cursus theologicus I, question I, disputation 2. In this particular text, the Dominican master raises questions concerning the scientific status and nature of theology. At issue, here, are a number of factors: namely, Christianity’s continual coming to terms with the “Third Entry” of Aristotelian thought into Western Christian intellectual culture – specifically the Aristotelian notion of ‘science’ and sacra doctrina’s satisfaction of those requirements – the Thomistic-commentary tradition, and the larger backdrop of the Iberian Peninsula’s flourishing “Second Scholasticism.”

Making of the Christian Mind, The: The Adventure of the Paraclete
Making of the Christian Mind, The: The Adventure of the Paraclete

In the third installment of The Making of the Christian Mind, James Patrick's Church history and 'adventure' series, we meet more towering figures of Christianity, among them Augustine and Benedict. The former, who abandoned rhetoric to become learned by Saint Ambrose, and the latter, whose Rule built a thousand monastic communities across Europe, were not isolated characters but beneficiaries of wisdom drawn entirely from the pursuit of holiness. What emerges is a culture of living and learning that flourishes on the foundations of prayer. This is the adventure of the Great Helper, who working throughout the passage of time post-Christ has come to guide not just the dreams and spirit of man, but his work and daily life.

The Making of the Christian Mind: The Adventure of the Paraclete: Volume Two
Making of the Christian Mind: The Adventure of the Paraclete, The

Fire and Witness is the second volume in James Patrick’s saga recounting the current of inspiration guiding, and at times sweeping, the christian heart toward full integration of the mind in the experience of revelation. In the first volume, A Waiting World, Patrick like a true storyteller captures the wonder and anxiety that finally perceives design and canon.

Moling in Meditation
Moling in Meditation

These quiet, surprising, amazing poems deliver to the reader fresh contact with wisdom for life––lessons we should have known had we paused a little more and looked, things we may have known and lost track of, insights we perhaps sense and now can finally grasp with these words of Moling––of Paul Murray––sharing with us his thoughts, his prayers, his stories of struggle and grace. These poems are “the hidden lost language of the soul” revealed.

 Jeremy Driscoll, O.S.B. Abbot of Mount Angel Abbey

Recovering Politics, Civilization, and the Soul
Recovering Politics, Civilization, and the Soul

The Western inheritance is under sustained theoretical and practical assault. Legitimate self-criticism has given way to nihilistic self-loathing and cultural, moral, and political repudiation is the order of the day. Yet, as Daniel J. Mahoney shows in this learned, eloquent, and provocative set of essays, two contemporary philosophic thinkers, Roger Scruton and Pierre Manent, have––separately and together––traced a path for the renewal of politics and practical reason, our civilized inheritance, the natural moral law, and the soul as the enduring site of self-conscious reflection, moral and civic agency, and mutual accountability.

Religion of Humanity, The
Religion of Humanity, The

"Is not modern democracy the finally-found form of the religion of Humanity?" (2007)
     The Religion of Humanity: The Illusion of Our Times is the first anthology in any language of the writings of the contemporary French political philosopher, Pierre Manent, on “the religion of Humanity.”  The striking phrase comes from nineteenth-century French thinker, Auguste Comte (1798–1857). Comte coined the phrase and indeed created an atheistic religion of a self-adoring Humanity.  In the aftermath of the Cold War, Manent observed victorious democracy interpreting itself in a similar framework. He took it upon himself to track this development, analyze it, and warn his fellow Europeans of its deleterious political, intellectual, moral, and spiritual effects. With conceptual precision and (most often) a sober tone, many contemporary sacred cows were gored.   But in addition to cursing the humanitarian darkness, he also lit many candles of judicious political, philosophical, moral, and spiritual analysis. This anthology is thus almost unique in its subject matter, and certainly unique in its treatment of the subject. It is a rarity and gem: a first-rate work of political philosophy.

Restoring Nature
Restoring Nature

The concept of nature has drawn criticism from many quarters, including the natural sciences, ethics, metaphysics and theology. In these essays, distinguished thomistic philosophers and theologians seek to recover nature for their disciplines. The volume contains extensive treatment of nature’s much disputed role in ethics, as well as its importance for the philosophy of science (including biology), philosophical anthropology, metaphysics, the philosophy of art, theology and other areas.