Forthcoming Books

American Heresies and Higher Education
American Heresies and Higher Education

These closely interrelated essays explore who we think we are and what we believe we’re supposed to do as free and relational persons these days.

The Anchors in the Heavens
Anchors in the Heavens, The

What Brague offers us here is not a narrative of decline, not a Jeremiad, not a nostalgic lament for the thought-world of a bygone era, but a sympathetic outline of some of the major tensions in the philosophical underpinnings of the modernity that we all inhabit. As such, it forms a part of his ongoing effort take modernity “more seriously than it takes itself”, to expose its hidden foundations, and to push it to its logical conclusions. In so doing, he hopes to help clarify where it is that we are going as a species, and to ensure that wherever it is, there is room for us humans in it.

Aquinas's Sources
Aquinas's Sources

The twenty-six works contained in this collection comprise some of the best and best-known scholars on the thought of Thomas Aquinas. Readers will find here helpful insights into St. Thomas’s adjudication of various streams in the philosophical and theological traditions. Most pertinent for readers today is the way in which Aquinas integrates faith and reason, resulting in mutual benefit.. 

The Ark, the Covenant, and the Poor Men's Chest
Ark, the Covenant, and the Poor Men's Chest, The

What role did Humanism play in the emergence of English Protestantism? This question has remained a live issue for Reformation scholarship over the past four centuries. In the Ark, the Covenant, and the Poor Men’s Chest, the author examines the issue in detail, utilizing categories drawn from the research of John W. O’Malley on the application of different modes of classical rhetoric to biblical interpretation during the Renaissance.

 

Cambridge Philosophers

A series of nine major articles by eminent philosophers on the life and work of some of the most important twentiethcentury philosophers at Cambridge. All these essays originally appeared in the journal Philosophy from the Royal Institute of Philosophy.

Contributors include:

Henry Sidgwick by Ross Harrison

A. N. Whitehead by Dorothy Emmet

J. M. E. McTaggart by Peter Geach

Bertrand Russell by Ray Monk

G. E. Moore by Thomas Baldwin

C. D. Broad by Theo Redpath

Ludwig Wittgenstein by G. E. M. Anscombe

F. P. Ramsey by D. H. Mellor

John Wisdom by Ilham Dilman

China's Quest for Liberty
China's Quest for Liberty

China’s Quest for Liberty is a personal story of a young man fully engaged in understanding the world he was born into and working toward making that world into a better and freer place to life. It is about an unexpected journey a Chinese journalist has taken to pursue freedom, involving such diverse fields or disciplines as politics, business, humanities, science and technology, government agencies and non-governmental organizations. Some took place as daily life, and some occurred in detentions or disasters.

Christian Philosophy and Free Will
Christian Philosophy and Free Will

Seifert analyses five understandings of the term “Christian philosophy” which have never been expounded with such clarity and which he rejects for different, partly for opposite, reasons. He presents these senses of Christian philosophy, and his reasons for rejecting them, in clear, straight-forward language.

Christianity and Philosophical Culture in the Fifth Century
Christianity and Philosophical Culture in the Fifth Century

The spirituality and immortality of the soul might seem to be an essential Christian doctrine, but in fact many early Christian writers held that the soul is material and that immortality is a gift. As Ernest Fortin’s study of Claudianus Mamertus (d. 475), a priest of Vienne in Gaul, and his De Statu Animae, On the State of the Soul (ca. 470) shows, St. Augustine did not settle the question. De Statu Animae is the only explicitly philosophical work in the West that we possess between Augustine (354–430) and Boethius. It responds to a defense of the corporeality of the soul by Bishop Faustus of Reii, modern Riez. Like many early Christian writers, Faustus held that God alone is spirit, so that the human soul is material, immortality is a gift, and Platonic dialogues or neo-Platonic textbooks of philosophy are the product of unhealthy curiosity.

The Coming Death and Future Resurrection of American Higher Education: 1885–2017
Coming Death and Future Resurrection of American Higher Education: 1885–2017, The

In The Coming Death and Future Resurrection of American Higher Education, Dr. Richard Bishirjian describes how, beginning in 2000, he founded Yorktown University and immediately confronted barriers designed to block entrance of his University from operating as a low cost, regionally accredited, high tech, Internet university.

The Concept of Social Justice
Concept of Social Justice, The

Readers will come away from this book with a deeper understanding of the origins of social justice, a sensitivity to the frequent abuses of the term, and a recognition of the forms in which it can be a valuable part of today’s political discourse.

The Concept, Time, and Discourse
Concept, Time, and Discourse, The

Alexandre Kojève (1902–1968) is most widely known in America for his provocative assertion that history is at its end, that is, its completion. In the “practical” sense, this means that the process of historical development can at last be seen (if from a distance) as the realization of the Marxist “universal and homogeneous state.” However, Kojève claimed as well that the history of philosophical thinking had also reached its goal in the transformation of philosophy, as the “love of wisdom” (or the unsatisfied quest for comprehensive knowledge), into that very Wisdom itself and had done so in the most essential respects in the philosophy of Hegel.

Conserving America?
Conserving America?

This collection of thematic essays by Notre Dame political theorist and public intellectual Patrick Deneen addresses the questions, is there something worth conserving in America, and if so, is America capable of conservation? Can a nation founded in a revolutionary moment that led to the founding of the first liberal nation be thought capable of sustaining and passing on virtues and practices that ennoble? Or is America inherently a nation that idolizes the new over the old, license over ordered liberty, and hedonism over self-rule? Can America conserve what is worth keeping for it to remain—or even become—a Republic?

Death Comes for the War Poets
Death Comes for the War Poets

On the centenary of the United States’ entry into World War One, Death Comes for the War Poets grapples with the full horror of trench warfare as experienced by the two greatest war poets, Siegfried Sassoon and Wilfred Owen. It does so through the eyes of the poets themselves but also through the eyes of the Spirit of Death. How does a human soul cope with the horror of war? Is there room for hope? And what of the Spirit of Death, ever present in times of war and peace? Can Death itself be changed? These questions are at the suffering heart of this powerful verse drama.

Docilitas
Docilitas

This book contains some sixteen chapters, each of which was given to an audience in some college or university setting. They consider what it is to teach, what to read, reading places, libraries, and class rooms. They look upon the duties of a teacher or professor as mostly a delight, because the truth should delight us.

The Eccentric Core
Eccentric Core, The

This volume is a tribute to Seth Benardete by contributors who had the rare good fortune of studying with him or who discovered the treasure of his writings. The collection originated with a memorial conference on “The Thought of Seth Benardete” in the spring of 2005 at Howard University. It expanded to include papers from an earlier memorial conference at the New School for Social Research in December 2002 as well as reviews of his books published over the years. The essays about or inspired by Benardete’s thought—on the Bible and Homer, the pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle and the Roman writers—suggest the remarkable range of his teaching and studies. The centrality of Plato is evident not only in these essays but also in the reviews, by readers who appreciate the importance of Benardete’s work, its subtlety and its depth. The volume closes with three of Benardete’s previously unpublished essays and a bibliography of his writings.

Ecumenical Jihad
Ecumenical Jihad

Juxtaposing “ecumenism” and “jihad,” two words that many would consider strange and at odds with one another, Peter Kreeft argues that we need to change our current categories and alignments. We need to realize that we are at war and that the sides have changed radically. Documenting the spiritual and moral decay that has taken hold of modern society, Kreeft issues a wake-up call to all God-fearing Christians, Jews, and Muslims to unite together in a “religious war” against the common enemy of godless secular humanism, materialism, and immorality.

An Essay on Philosophical Method
Essay on Philosophical Method, An

“My best book in matter; in style, I may call it my only book.” – R. G. Collingwood

Exercises in the Elements
Exercises in the Elements

This title, which at first sight seems curious, shows Pieper’s philosophical work as rooted in the basics. He takes his inspiration from Plato – and his Socrates – and Thomas Aquinas. With them, he is interested in philosophy as pure theory, the theoretical being precisely the non-practical. The philosophizer wants to know what all existence is fundamentally about, what “reality” “really” means. With Plato, Pieper eschews the use of language to convince an audience of anything which is not the truth. If Plato was opposed to the sophists – among them the politicians – Pieper is likewise opposed to discourse that leads to the “use” of philosophy to bolster a totalitarian regime or any political or economic system.

 

The French Revolution Confronts Pius VI
French Revolution Confronts Pius VI, The

The writings of Pope Pius VI, head of the Catholic Church during the most destructive period of the French Revolution, were compiled in two volumes by M.N.S. Guillon and published in 1798 and 1800. But during the Revolution, the reign of Napoleon, and the various revolutionary movements of the 19th century, there were extraordinary efforts to destroy writings that critiqued the revolutionary ideology. Many books and treatises, if they survived the revolution or the sacking from Napoleon’s armies. To this day, no public copy of Guillon’s work exists in Paris.

From Aristotle to Thomas Aquinas
From Aristotle to Thomas Aquinas

Saint Thomas Aquinas is an Aristotelian (few scholars would question that) and he is the most important author in the entire history of natural law theory. Yet, there is no natural law theory in Aristotle. Even the concept of person, which is so important in Aquinas’ ethics, seems to be foreign to Aristotle’s culture and thought. How can Aquinas’ ethics be said Aristotelian? How can his natural law theory?