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Soul-Wrestling
Soul-Wrestling

Here you’ll find a weekly devotional for Christian disciples of all stripes, but with a different twist—it is a series of brief spiritual ruminations accompanied by black-and-white photographs, so you can meditate on the verbal and the visual at the same time—synesthesia! The more senses entangled up in a memory, the more likely we will make it our own. Each week you’ll encounter a Scripture reading, a recommended hymn, a lead-in quotation, probing comments on the selected theme, and a closing prayer. These all work together to create an “ambience” which promotes spiritual growth.

Abortion
Abortion

Introduction: Reasons for abortion. Methods of abortion. Effects on women. The Church and Abortion: The Bible. Christian tradition. Recent Church statements. Non-religious Arguments: Being a person. Having an interest. Stages of development. The start of life. Identical twinning. Human potential. Bodily rights. Responsibility for children. Prenatal tests. Unwanted children. Ectopic pregnancy. Responding to Abortion: Backstreet abortion. ‘Imperfect’ legislation. Doctors and nurses. Promotion of abortion. Social action. Further Reading. Church Documents. Glossary.

The Actor and the Spectator
Actor and the Spectator, The

Can a machine think? More pointedly, if I am a machine, can I think? Beck answers these questions by analyzing two clusters of metaphors – one of which dramatizes human beings as spontaneous agents (actors), and the other sees them as observers attempting to explain causally their own behavior and that of the actor (spectators). Using a hypothetical scene with two spectators, each explaining an action, and each representing a different way of viewing the world, Beck points up the central philosophical problems raised by the varieties of ways in which we explain our own actions and those of others.

“[F]ull of insights and fruitful suggestions.” – Stephan Körner, TLS

After 40 Years
After 40 Years

After Forty Years: Vatican Council II’s Diverse Legacy, as the title indicates, commemorates the 40th anniversary of the Second Vatican Council of 1962–1965. However, the book makes no attempt to deal with the legacy of Vatican II as a whole, that is, with the Council’s complete legacy, but only with some important parts of it. The Council as a whole represents a topic too vast to be covered within the confines of a single volume, as it was too vast to be covered within the confines of a single Fellowship of Catholic Scholars convention. This book covers those aspects of the Council that were of special interest to some of the leading scholars and academics active in the Fellowship. These favored topics were covered by means of the scholarly papers prepared especially for the Fellowship’s annual convention held in Charlotte, North Carolina, in September 2005. This book deals with the two great Constitutions on the Church (Lumen Gentium and Gaudium et Spes); its epochal Constitution on Divine Revelation, and hence also on Scripture (Dei Verbum); its Declaration on Religious Liberty (Dignitatis Humanae); and its Decree on Ecumenism (Unitatis Redintegratio). Because of the special interest of a number of the contributors, there is a heavy emphasis on the meaning and significance of the “anthropology” of Gaudium et Spes (the favorite Vatican II document of Pope John Paul II, by the way, who was one of the architects of this document at the Council). This book, however, is no superficial survey of the general ideas and thrust of the Second Vatican Council, as so many books on the subject turn out to be; but it is rather an in-depth look at the meaning an import of several of the Council’s most important themes and decisions. As is usual with the books based on Fellowship conventions, the volume contains a number of outstanding contributors, including Jesuit Father William S. Kurz of Marquette, Sister Mary Timothy Prokes, f.s.e., of the Notre Dame Graduate School of Christendom College, and New York University’s Emeritus Professor of Psychology, Dr. Paul Vitz, now teaching at the new Institute for Psychological Sciences (IPS) in Northern Virginia.

Agnosticism
Agnosticism

Until the nineteenth century, thinkers who entertained doubts about the existence of God were branded “atheists” and “infidels,” and were subject to persecutions. But in the late nineteenth-century Britain a group of highly respectable thinkers emerged who argued for the radical conclusion that theology is impossible, and that we humans cannot know what, if anything, lies behind the veil of appearances. This volume provides extracts of the best-known agnostics (Spencer, Huxley, Stephen, Clifford, and Tyndall), and their less well-known theological opponents. The debate marks a major turning point in Western attitudes toward religious belief; the burden of proof was henceforth firmly placed on the shoulders of the theologians.

America's Spiritual Capital
America's Spiritual Capital

Spiritual capital is the fund of beliefs, examples, and commitments that are transmitted from generation to generation through a religious tradition, and which attach people to the transcendent source of fulfillment and happiness. America has created the greatest civilization the world has ever known, and it has done this because of its spiritual capital, the values and beliefs by which individual Americans have interpreted and transformed the world. The Judeo-Christian heritage has historically served as the spiritual capital of America.

WATCH NEWSMAX.TV'S INTERVIEW WITH CO-AUTHOR, THEODORE ROOSEVELT MALLOCH HERE.

The American Catholic Voter
American Catholic Voter, The

From the earliest days in the New World through the disputed presidential election of 2000, the influence of Catholics on American politics has followed a peculiar arc. In Colonial America, Catholics were often denied participation in the process; but in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the Catholic bloc was recognized as a swing vote that determined the outcome of numerous elections; and today Catholics are either so assimilated or disunited that as a group their impact is declining.

Augustinian-Cartesian Index
Augustinian-Cartesian Index

Since the publication of Etienne Gilson’s magisterial study, La Liberté chez Descartes et la théologie, in 1913, Cartesian scholars have been trying to determine the extent of Augustine’s influence on Descartes. Zbigniew Janowski’s Augustinian-Cartesian Index brings what seems to be a definitive answer. In his Index Janowski shows page by page, in Latin and in the English translation, the passages in the Meditations that find their counterparts in the Augustinian corpus. In his meticulous commentary the author analyzes Augustine’s role in the formation and development of Descartes’s philosophy. There are also two appendixes with borrowings from Thomas Aquinas and Bacon, and a short essay on the role Bacon played in the transformation of Cartesian metaphysics. TheAugustinian-Cartesian Index is a major contribution to the understanding of the origins of modern philosophy and Augustinian tradition in the seventeenth century. It will become a standard reference tool.

Back to the Drawing Board
Back to the Drawing Board

Back to the Drawing Board: The Future of the Pro-Life Movement is an unprecedented collection of thoughtful and sometimes painfully honest essays, evaluating the pro-life cause thirty years after Roe v. Wade. Contributing writers are the movement's most respected leaders, including Dr. James Dobson, Fr. Richard John Neuhaus, Nat Hentoff, Dr. Mildred Jefferson, Congressman Chris Smith, Phyllis Schlafly, Rabbi Daniel Lapin, Paul Weyrich, and Jean Garton, among others. They are statesmen, scholars, doctors, lawyers, judges, activists and mothers. They are Evangelical Christian, Muslim, Atheist, Jewish, and Catholic. They are men and women, young and old, liberal and conservative, Democrat and Republican – and third party. Many are veterans, some are new; but all have labored in the effort, and care about its future.

Baseball and Memory
Baseball and Memory

In this historical/philosophical reflection, Lee Congdon writes of the ways in which baseball spurs memory. This is particularly important at a time when many Americans suffer from a form of amnesia that renders them defenseless in the face of concerted efforts to seize possession of the past. “Who controls the past controls the future,” George Orwell wrote in Nineteen Eighty-Four, “who controls the present controls the past.” Baseball can, and does, stand in the way of those whose ambition it is to gain and maintain power by pretending that memory cannot be trusted; what was once thought to be “the past” was merely a fiction that served the interests of a ruling class.

The Battle for the Catholic Mind
Battle for the Catholic Mind, The

A Selection of outstanding articles from the Fellowship’s first thirteen years of Proceedings.

Contributors include Germain Grisez, Msgr. George A. Kelly, Paul C. Vitz, Joseph M. Boyle, Rev. Ronald Lawler, OFM CAP., John M. Finnis, James Hitchcock, Maura A. Daly, R. V. Young, John M. Haas, Robert P. George, Joyce A. Little, Benedict M. Ashley, O.P., Alice Ramos, Rev. Marvin R. O’Connell, Janet E. Smith, Gerard V. Bradley, and Rev. Robert Sokolowski.

Bertrand Russell
Bertrand Russell

In addition to being one of the most important logicians and philosophers of this century, Russell was also one of its most prominent public figures, and his influence on his time was not confined to academic subjects. This book deals with Russell’s work on the foundation of mathematics and to the philosophical method that he developed as a consequence of his successes in that field, but there are also examples of the more popular side of his work, with discussions of positions he defended in the philosophy of religion, political philosophy, history, and education, and one of the dominant hemes of his life, political activism.

Bertrand Russell and the Origins of Analytical Philosophy
Bertrand Russell and the Origins of Analytical Philosophy

This collection of new essays from distinguished philosophers and Russell scholars explores Russell’s own unique and enduringly important contribution to shaping the concerns and the methods of contemporary analytical philosophers. It includes both general discussions of the nature of analytical philosophy and minutely detailed analyses of Russell’s own arguments, and covers the whole range of Russell’s famously varied output. Contributors include Nicholas Griffin, Peter Hylton , A. C. Grayling, C. M. Kilmister, and others.

Bibliographia Malebranchiana
Bibliographia Malebranchiana

A very complete, annotated bibliographical listing of works on the seventeenth-century philosopher, Nicolas Malebranche (1638–1715).

Both Sides of the Altar
Both Sides of the Altar

Why would a priest turn his back on his priesthood and walk away from his religious vocation and its demanding responsibilities? Why did he become a priest in the first place? And how do such men make reparations for their defection? Both Sides of the Altar strives to look at these questions through one such priest’s life, that of Frank Morgan.

Briefly Considered
Briefly Considered

In commenting on contemporary social and political issues, Dougherty provides a critique of the humbug that often passes as philosophy. Much of what is published as philosophy, he claims, has little to do with the pursuit of wisdom, and much is written without any knowledge of the history of philosophy – for example, a professor of moral philosophy, by his own admission, lecturing without any knowledge of the Stoics, and another professor at a prominent university, in a nationally televised series of lectures devoted to the history of philosophy, jumping from Plato to Descartes with nothing in between. Dougherty argues that the ancients, no less intelligent or observant than we, have much to say to us about nature, human nature, and the polity. It is from the vantage point of what he takes to be perennial philosophy that Dougherty discusses topics such as “The Acquisition and Use of Power,” “Property as a Condition of Liberty,” “Tolerance.” “Responsibility,” and “The Nature of Scientific Explanation.”

Carnie
Carnie

Les Bodnar is a respected orthopedic surgeon and former physician for the Notre Dame football team. His memoir, however, is from an era long before that fame, when he was 12 and 13, and a part of his father’s carnival. The romance of carnival life, of escaping the 9-5 doldrums and somehow recapturing yourself, is there, but so too the hard work and trials, the difficulty of putting on a show day after day and week after week for people who both love the show and are apprehensive of the people who put it on.

The Cast of Valor
Cast of Valor, The

In stark and bracing contrast with the signature narcissism and self-pity of contemporary verse, The Cast of Valor is not “feeling verse,” nor is it confessional or even personal. This is true poetry, communal in the greater Christian tradition and anchored in universal human experience. Traditional English verse is employed by the poet in meter and rhyme, but the subject matter is far from archaic in theme and perspective. This poetry is universal in its consideration of historic parallels in individual, personal lives. Born in Nashville, Tennessee, and educated at Vanderbilt and Yale, Rollin Lasseter formed his poetic imagination half a century ago by his mentors in faith and verse – Donald Davidson, Cleanth Brooks, Dorothy L. Sayers, Charles Williams, and W. B. Yeats – and accompany the author into the religious challenges of the millennium. The modern soul is exiled from religious certainties and conventional understanding. It must either reconcile to permanent exile from the disorder of modern culture, or find the connection to Faith that would allow a permanent home in God’s order.

The Catholic Citizen
Catholic Citizen, The

The Catholic Church today finds herself at the very center of some of the most important and controversial moral and social developments of our day, including abortion, capital punishment, cloning, so-called “gay marriage,” pacifism and the morality of war, the ethics of healthcare in a technologically advanced but morally deficient society, and other related subjects. The Fellowship of Catholic Scholars attempts to address issues such as these by inviting the best and most knowledgeable scholars and commentators to speak at its annual conventions. This book brings together the addresses and responses devoted to these topics at the Fellowship's 26th annual convention in 2003. The contributors include the renowned John Finnis of Oxford and Notre Dame, Mary Eberstadt of the Hoover Institution, Christopher Wolfe of Marquette University, William E. May of the John Paul II Institute, Gerard V. Bradley of the Notre Dame Law School, Patrick Lee of Franciscan University, Steven A. Long of the University of St. Thomas, E. Christian Brugger of Loyola University in New Orleans, J. Brian Benestad of the University of Scranton, the Rev. Michael J. Baxter of Notre Dame, and, not least, the well-known moral theologian, Msgr. William B. Smith of St. Joseph's Seminary. Nowhere between two covers can there be found a sharper searchlight trained upon some of the principal moral and social issues of our day than in this collection.

The Catholic Imagination
Catholic Imagination, The

A wide-ranging and enlightening discussion on creativity within the Catholic context.

Contents

Introduction: Kenneth D. Whitehead

Keynote Address: Finding the Sacred in the Profane: Twentieth-century Catholic Literature – Robert Royal

The Beauty of the Cross: The Theological Aesthetics of Hans Urs von Balthasar – Rev. Raymond T. Gawronski, S.J.

Response to Father Raymond T. Gawronski – Larry Chapp

The Sacramental Vision of J.R.R. Tolkien – C.N. Sue Abromaitis

Sacred Architecture and the Christian Imagination – Steven J. Schloeder

Response to Stephen J. Schloeder – Catherine Brown Tkacz

Cinema: The Power of Visual Imagery – Barbara R. Nicolosi

The Music of the Spheres; or, the Metaphysics of Music – Robert R. Reilly

Response to Robert R. Reilly – Rev. Basil Cole, O.P.

The John Cardinal Wright Award Acceptance Speech – Thomas W. Hilgers, M.D.

A New Era in the Renewal of the Liturgy – Helen Hull Hitchcock

Liturgiam Authenticam and the Prospects for Authentic Liturgical Renewal – Rev. Jerry Pokorsky

The Catholic Thing
Catholic Thing, The

This volume brings together some of the very best commentary on a wide range of recent events and controversies by some of the very best Catholic writers in the English language: Ralph McInerny, Michael Novak, Fr. James V. Schall, Hadley Arkes, Robert Royal, Anthony Esolen, Brad Miner, George Marlin, David Warren, Austin Ruse, Francis Beckwith, and many others.

Christian Persecutions in the Middle East
Christian Persecutions in the Middle East

In his new book, author and political commentator George J. Marlin, chairman of Aid to the Church in Need-USA – an agency under the guidance of the Pope that supports the persecuted and suffering Church around the world – describes the sharp rise in Christian persecution in the Middle East. After brief narratives on the rise of Christianity, Islam, and terrorism in the Middle East, Marlin documents country by country, acts of twenty-first century Christian persecution that is nearing a bloody climax that could produce the unthinkable: a Middle East without Christians and the destruction of an ancient patrimony that has been a vital link to the very birth of Christianity.

Cloning and Stem Cell Research
Cloning and Stem Cell Research

Catholic teaching regarding human cloning is closely linked to the sanctity of life, the status of the embryo, and the meaning of sex and marriage. It addresses the tensions between the relief of suffering-which can be sought in good or bad ways-and respect for every human being. Anthony McCarthy sets out the scientific background to cloning, explains the Church's teaching, and examines secular arguments for and against human cloning.

Commentary on the Epistle to the Hebrews
Commentary on the Epistle to the Hebrews

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In addition to the great theological works, such as the Summa Theologiae, for which he is justly acclaimed, St. Thomas Aquinas commented on much of the New Testament. He found in the Pauline Epistles a comprehensive exposition of the grace of Christ, from treating the Mystical Body itself to guidance for its principal members. As the summit of the Apostle’s doctrine, the Epistle to the Hebrews was a treatment on the Head of the Mystical Body, Christ inasmuch as He is the high priest of the New Testament.

The Conservative Rebellion
Conservative Rebellion, The

Dr. Richard Bishirjian’s Conservative Rebellion examines the American conservative movement in light of phases of American history in which the life of the American nation took shape from forces and conditions of the American soul.

 

Current Issues in Idealism
Current Issues in Idealism

Focused on the idealist/realist dispute, contributors also discuss the relation of idealism to ethics, metaphysics, and epistemology. The volume also deals with the distinctions between ontological and conceptual forms of idealism, the place of idealism within the analytic tradition of philosophy, and the coherence of the idealist/realist distinction. Contributors include: Donald Davidson, Tom Sorrell, T. L. S. Sprigge, Phillip Ferreira, et al.

Descartes and the Dutch
Descartes and the Dutch

The first study based entirely on primary sources of the Dutch academic reactions to Descartes's philosophy. 

Descartes's Ballet
Descartes's Ballet

In his 54th year, Rene Descartes went to Stockholm at the invitation of Queen Christina. He caught pneumonia there and died on February 11, 1650. It is said that because Descartes refused to dance, Queen Christina charged him with writing the verses for a court ballet, La Naissance de la Paix. If Descartes did write the ballet, it would be the last work of his published during his lifetime. And because of its political content, it would be important as a guide for constructing Descartes’s political philosophy, which he certainly had but never published. And what a wonderful story! Alas, the evidence of Descartes’s authorship is virtually nonexistent. It reduces to the mere fact that he sent a copy of the published verses to a friend . . . in order, he said, to make the package heavier so it would not get lost. Almost certainly the ballet was written by Helie Poirier, a professional writer of French verse.

The Development of Mathematical Logic
Development of Mathematical Logic, The

A clear, straightforward summary of the history of formal logic from Aristotle to Gödel. Nidditch discusses the four main trends at the root of modern logic: Aristotle’s theory of the syllogism; the idea of a universal language; the idea of the parts of mathematics forming deductive systems; and the discoveries in mathematics in the early nineteenth century. He outlines the chief ideas and theories on mathematical logic, including Jevons, Peirce, Boole, Russell, and Whitehead. The text is easy to read and gives the beginning student a valuable perspective on mathematical logic.

Empire and Imperialism
Empire and Imperialism

The 1870s is a key decade in the evolution of British thinking about the nature, purpose, and future of empire. Increasing economic competition began to disturb the complacent assumption about Britain's leadership in technology and in the world economy. The growth of other countries, most notably the United States and Germany, put in question Britain's survival as a great power. These changes set in motion a reappraisal of Britain's empire and its importance to the motherland, and a heated debated as to whether colonialism and imperialism were a burden rather than a benefit to Britain. The discussion of the 1870s set the agenda for the debates of the next half-century. This volume documents the writing central to the debate; it includes contributions b such leading British thinkers and statesmen as J. A. Froude, Robert Lowe, Edward Dicey, Frederic Seebohm, Lord Carnarvon, Gladstone, Julius Vogel, and Lord Blanchford.

Malebranche's First and Last Critics
Malebranche's First and Last Critics

Includes the influential firstpublished critique of Malebranche’s Of the Search for the Truth by Simon Foucher, plus the translation of the long correspondence between Malebranche and Dortous de Mairan, which is the basis of Malebranche’s criticism of Spinoza.

Essays on Law, Religion, and Morality
Essays on Law, Religion, and Morality

The most controversial foundational issue today in both legal philosophy and constitutional law is the relationship between objective moral norms and the positive law. Is it possible for the state to be morally “neutral” about such matters as marriage, the family, religion, religious liberty, and – as the Supreme Court once famously phrased it – “the meaning of life”? If such neutrality is possible, is it desirable?

Ethics in Nursing Practice
Ethics in Nursing Practice

“This book goes a considerable way towards filling a gap which Christian nurses may become aware of when studying ethics i.e. a clear exposition of a Christian perspective on ethical issues affecting nursing.” – Dorothy Whyte, Ethics and Medicine

Euthanasia, Clinical Practice and the Law
Euthanasia, Clinical Practice and the Law

“This book is a wonderful antidote for anyone tempted to despair of the obfuscation, duplicity and just plain muddleheadedness of many of the participants in the public debate about euthanasia. . . . If you are interested in the debate over euthanasia (and none of us can afford not to be) beg, borrow or buy this book.” – Karin Clark, News Weekly

 

Fighting the Good Fight
Fighting the Good Fight

The story of New York's feisty Conservative Party is really the saga of America's tumultuous political maturity. Born in response to the rise of Nelson Rockefeller's liberal Republicanism, the New York's Conservative Party has grown to become the nation's most successful third party. It has also turned out to be its political conscience.

 

Finding a Common Thread
Finding a Common Thread

In this book, a group of prominent scholar-teachers meditate on how to read, in the context of a specifically Christian university or college education, some of the greatest texts of the Western tradition. Each author devotes himself or herself to a single text. In many cases, the authors have been reading, rereading, marking, ruminating, inwardly digesting, teaching, and discussing their text for several decades, so that they offer here a distillation of years of familiarity and reflection.

Free Trade
Free Trade

Despite the renewed interest in the repeal of the Corn Laws (1846), the original source material surrounding the repeal legislation has remained difficult to find for researchers, especially those outside Britain. This volume offers easy access to key Parliamentary documents, pamphlets, and speeches of the Anti-Corn Law League and a number of contemporary documents on the anticipated effects of repeal by Torrens,McCulloch, Porter, Pennington, and others.

From Witchery to Sanctity
From Witchery to Sanctity

Although Nathaniel Hawthorne, the renowned author of The Scarlet Letter, shunned organized religion, his stories were heavily weighted with sin and guilt. The fascinating history of generations of Hawthornes and their journey from Puritanism to Catholicism offers a penetrating glimpse into an extraordinary family. As one critic remarked, it is a story enveloped "with a veil woven of intermingled gloom and brightness."

Gender and Science
Gender and Science

Explores how late nineteenth-century science affected the construction and understanding of gender categories. Presenting a range of views on issues raised by the women’s movement, the volume particularly focuses on the question of middleclass women’s education, occupations, and professions.

Gene Therapy
Gene Therapy

Introduction. Background Science: Genes. Genetic disorders, ‘Preventing’ genetic disorders. Germline gene therapy. Somatic gene therapy. Genetic enhancement. Delivering genes. Risks and benefits. Cloning. Cloning for birth. Cloning for research/transplantation. Stem cell research. Catholic Teaching: Respecting the embryo. Non-therapeutic interventions. Respect for liberty. Designer babies. In vitro fertilization [UK]. Cloning. Family relationships. Enhancement. Genetic enhancement. Germ-line therapy: Moral concerns. Somatic therapy: Moral concerns. Conclusion. Further Reading. Glossary.

Genetic Intervention on Human Subjects
Genetic Intervention on Human Subjects

“[This book] will be of immense interest to all ethicists, regardless of whether or not they are involved in human genetic intervention, or are Roman Catholic. . . .

Give Me Liberty
Give Me Liberty

The book revolves around the motivation and context of the American Founding and drives home its relevance to contemporary living. The Founders fought against tyranny that attempted to control their physical and spiritual lives. Unjust governance was deemed to be without authority. Aristocrats and commoners ultimately must answer to the Final Authority. These concepts are reflected in the Declaration of Independence: “all men are created equal and they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights — that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.” Sandoz is not only a scholar, but a grandfather; his words will engender Liberty for future generations.

Good Knights
Good Knights

These stories represent an intermediate stage in the evolution of the Knight brothers in Ralph McInerny’s fiction. In The Noonday Devil, Phil, in his capacity as private detective, was fairly close to the action, but by no means the major character. Roger, his blimpsized brother, entered obliquely into the story but ended by starring in the finale.

Greek Ethics
Greek Ethics

This is a concise and easy-to-read account of the ethical philosophy of the Greeks, from the Sophists to the Stoics. With particular emphasis on Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, the author skillfully traces the themes of law and nature, virtue, knowledge and happiness, and love and friendship, giving a comprehensive account of the meanings the Greeks attached to expressions such as “justice,” “voluntary action,” “virtue,” and “good.” “The story of Greek moral philosophy has been told many times, at varying lengths and different levels, but Mrs Huby has shown that there was room for yet another version.” – Philosophical Quarterly

Hegelian Ethics
Hegelian Ethics

Walsh’s study is based on a comparison of Hegel with Kant. Examining their methods, the scope of their ethical theories, and their views as to the content of ethics, he concludes that, while Hegel worked with a moral psychology very different from Kant’s, his ethical theory should not be dismissed for that reason. Walsh explains how Hegel sought in his own ethical theory to overcome the deficiencies of Kantian ethics, first in his early writings through the notion of a morality of love, and then in his mature system by means of the conception of “concrete ethics” (sittlichkeit).

Herbert Spencer and the Limits of the State
Herbert Spencer and the Limits of the State

Contains a representative sample of writings by the Individualists and their critics, and also by some leading Victorian politicians who attempted to translate political theories into practical politics. The debates between these thinkers raise some fundamental issues about the nature of liberty and the role and limits of the State that remain with us still. Many present-day concerns, including the issues at stake between liberals and communitarians, are to be found prefigured in the pages of this collection.

A History of Political Thought in the English Revolution
History of Political Thought in the English Revolution, A

Discusses analytically all the important thinkers and publicists who were active at the time of the great revolution. Zagorin gives particular emphasis to the period 1645–60, when Hobbes, the Leveller leaders, and Winstanley were active. The book also restores to attention other writers who, although influential at the time, have seen been neglected and relates the motives of these men to the underlying causes of the age.

Hume on Miracles
Hume on Miracles

Containing the most important secondary literature, this work focuses on responses to Hume’s Essay on Miracles. The material included ranges from 1751 to 1883, and includes such authors as T. Rutherford, William Adams, John Leland, George Campbell, Rev. S. Vince, John Hollis, Rev. James Somerville, Dr. Wately, Rev. A. C. L. D’Arblay, Rev. Francis Kilvert, Malthus, Joseph Napier, Joseph Mazzinin Wheeler, Sir Edmund Beckett, James McCosh, and Huxley.

Hume on Natural Religion
Hume on Natural Religion

Focuses on general remarks on Hume’s life and philosophy, his Natural History of Religion, Dialogues concerning Natural Religion, and his work on the immortality of the soul and suicide. Contributors include: William Warburton, Henry O’Connor, Thomas Hayter, Joseph Priestley, Joseph Milner, William Craven, and George Giles.

Hume's Philosophy of Belief
Hume's Philosophy of Belief

Stresses the importance of Hume’s An Inquiry concerning Human Understanding not only as a philosophical text in its own right, but also as the starting point for developing an understanding of broader philosophical issues. Flew takes in such modern thinkers as Peirce, Wittgenstein, Frege, and Ryle. First published in 1961, this is a reprint of the corrected 1966 edition.

Hunting and Weaving
Hunting and Weaving

The essays in this volume honor the work of political scientist and Eric Voegelin scholar, Barry Cooper, by considering how political philosophy (a form of hunting) and empiricism get “woven” together (to borrow a metaphor from Plato). In other words, they consider how science needs to be conducted if it is to remain true to our commonsense experience of the world and to facilitate political judgment.

The Hunting of Leviathan
Hunting of Leviathan, The

Mintz examines the contemporary reaction in England to the “Monster of Malmesbury,” with a particular focus on his materialism and moral philosophy. He argues that most scholars have ignored the contemporary reaction to Hobbes and thus have failed to realize the importance of the historical context against which the analysis of Hobbes’s ideas can be measured.

Infertility and Medically Assisted Conception
Infertility and Medically Assisted Conception

As infertility rates among couples increase, so do the lengths to which people go to have children. In this booklet Agneta Sutton looks at the Church's teaching in the area of medically assisted conception, exploring the effects of modern treatments on the couple and the child.

Is a Culture of Life Still Possible in the U.S.?
Is a Culture of Life Still Possible in the U.S.?

Subjects from public philosophy and natural law to spiritual healing and alienation, and building a culture of life, from contributors Deal Hudson, Robert P. George, Rev. Stephen F. Brett, SSJ, Gerald L. Campbell, Patrick Fagan, John Haas, Bernard Dobranski, and others.

Issues for a Catholic Bioethic
Issues for a Catholic Bioethic

“It conveys predictably that Catholic bioethics has as much concern with philosophical issues about body and soul as it has to do with medical casuistry. Less predictably it offers some welcome indications that current Catholic discussion is biblically, as well as philosophically formed: a rather good section called ‘Anthropology’ contains two memorable essays, one by Professor John Haldane on the philosophy of the body and one by Gregory Glazov on biblical anthropology. There are discussions of sexual ethics (with especial reference to John-Paul II’s allocutions) as well as of the vocation of health care and the vocation to suffer. But there is attention to practical questions, too. Six contributions concern themselves with the relation of Catholic medical practice to the norms of contemporary secular society, and especially the problem of cooperation in evil, an understandable preoccupation.” – Oliver O’Donovan, New Blackfriars

It's the Sun, Not Your SUV
It's the Sun, Not Your SUV

Global temperatures have increased since 1880. New data show that solar impacts (radiation and magnetic flux) have increased by the same amount and follow the dips in temperature from 1938 to 1970. The report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) says that, based upon computer models, increased solar absorption by CO2 and other “greenhouse gases” (GHG) are overwhelmingly the basis for temperature increases.

John Craige's Mathematical Principles of Christian Theology
John Craige's Mathematical Principles of Christian Theology

Seventeenth-century mathematician Craige attempted to determine the earliest possible date of the Apocalypse by using the most current mathematical and philosophical reasoning, but, more often than not, he was ridiculed as an eccentric and a crank.

John Locke and Christianity
John Locke and Christianity

Locke’s The Reasonableness of Christianity, published anonymously in 1695, entered a world upset by fierce theological conflict and immediately became a subject of controversy. At issue were the author’s intentions. John Edwards labeled it a Socinian work and charged that it was subversive not only of Christianity but of religion itself; others praised it as a sure preservative of both. Few understood Locke’s intentions.

John Paul II – Witness to Truth
John Paul II – Witness to Truth

This volume consists of the addresses delivered to the 23rd Annual Convention of the Fellowship of Catholic Scholars held in September 2000. Each chapter is from a major Catholic social thinker on various aspects of the reign of Pope John Paul II.

Articles include:

“John Paul II and the Family” by Elizabeth Fox-Genovese

“John Paul II and the Public Square” by Fr. Richard John Neuhaus

“John Paul II – Witness to Hope” by George Weigel

“John Paul II – Life Issues” by Janet E. Smith

“John Paul II and Ecumenism” by Bishop J. Basil Meeking

Kant's Pre-Critical Ethics
Kant's Pre-Critical Ethics

Kant’s pre-critical period is commonly considered to run from 1747 when he publishedOn the True Estimate of Living Forces to the appearance in 1770 of his inaugural dissertation, On the Form and Principles of the Sensible and the Intellectual Worlds. It is in this period that the origins of his later system of ethical thought can be found. Yet there is very little literature in English dealing with this early period, and many secondary sources deal only with his later major ethical works, the Critique of Practical Reason and Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals.

Keynes
Keynes

Keynes’s General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money (published in February 1936) is probably the most influential and controversial economics book of the twentieth century. Keynes claimed to have undermined the foundations of orthodox economics and to have developed a radically new way of thinking about unemployment.

The Language Connection
Language Connection, The

Why have philosophers and linguists in the West always failed to agree about language? How can we use language to talk about language? Is the division between the disciplines of philosophy and linguistics artificial?

Last Things
Last Things

The Bible teaching on the end times have long been a source of sometimes morbid fascination for Christians. And now, at the turn of another millennium, we are seeing renewed bouts of predictions fever. Amid the frenzy, how can we take end-times teachings seriously and understand them clearly?

Liberalism, Democracy, and the State in Britain
Liberalism, Democracy, and the State in Britain

The five pieces reprinted here are part of the vibrant polemical literature of liberalism in the last four decades of the nineteenth century. The dynamic, highly reflective nature of British liberalism in this period is already familiar through substantial texts such as Mill’s Subjection of Women (1969) and Spencer’s The Man Versus the State (1884). However, many works on a smaller scale were also important in defining the contours of liberal thought when the political fortunes of liberalism were at their height. This volume represents a sample of such writings. It will be of interest to scholars and advanced undergraduates studying liberalism and English political thought and history. Contributors include James Fitzjames Stephen, J. E. E. Dalberg-Acton, T. H. Green, Herbert Spencer, and others.

Liberty
Liberty

Mill’s On Liberty has turned out to be, as he predicted, the most widely read and long-lasting of his writings. It has proved, however, extremely difficult to pin Mill down to any definite political doctrines. His contemporaries clearly had the same problems as have beset modern commentators. Some portray Mill as a dangerous revolutionary, a latter-day Jacobin; others see him as peddling mere platitudes. Was he aiming to preach Pyrrhonism, undermine the Church, and dissolve social bonds; or were his principles already informing the thought and practice of Victorian Britain?

Logos and Eros
Logos and Eros

Included here are twenty essays from renowned scholars, honoring Stanley Rosen, whose work in ancient and modern philosophy is among the most influential today. Rosen is the author of fourteen books, including nine from St. Augustine’s Press.

Ludwig Wittgenstein
Ludwig Wittgenstein

Essays by John Wisdom, Theodore Redpath, George Pitcher, Morris Lazerowitz, and others attempt to elucidate and critically assess Wittgenstein’s reflections on a number of important linguistic problems.

Marriage and the Common Good
Marriage and the Common Good

This volume consists of the addresses delivered to the 22nd Annual Convention of the Fellowship of Catholic Scholars held in Chicago in September 1999. Each chapter includes a discussion of one of the major themes related to the contemporary question of marriage and the common good expounded by a competent senior scholar, followed by a response on the same subject by a younger scholar. The end result is an in-depth treatment of several of the major issues that concern marriage and the family today.

Mill and Religion

The publication of Mill’s Three Essays elicited a remarkable diversity of responses. Anonymous authors in the prominent literary and theological reviews of the day joined philosophers, from empiricists to idealists, and theologians, from Anglicans to Unitarians. Sell here gathers and introduces a representative selection of the reviews, essays, and extracts that met this work. The writers, though diverse, are united in one view – that what Mill had written mattered – and their debate continued for many years.

Motivated Irrationality
Motivated Irrationality

“To explain irrational belief formation and irrational action . . . we may invoke the notions of self-deception and weakness of will. . . . When described in a certain way, these phenomena appear so par-adoxical that doubts have been raised as to their very possibility. David Pear’s Motivated Irrationality is a major step towards this goal. . . .

Narcissist Nation
Narcissist Nation

It’s not easy being Catholic and conservative in secular ‘Blue State’ New York, but that’s what George J. Marlin is, always has been, and always will be. Don’t ask him to change.

On the Wealth of Nations
On the Wealth of Nations

The first book to capture the impact Smith’s great work had on his contemporaries, this volume documents the immediate reaction in Britain, the entrance of the Wealth of Nations into politics, and the early reception on the Continent. Features letters written to Smith, early reviews, and extracts from books, and includes a wealth of previously inaccessible criticism and analysis, including contributions from David Hume, William Robertson, Adam Ferguson, Lord Lauderdale, Dugald Stewart, William Pitt, Henry Mackenzie, J. G. Schiller, and others.

Organ Transplants and the Definition of Death
Organ Transplants and the Definition of Death

A Brief History of Transplant Medicine: Problems of rejection. Breakthrough. Moral Issues in Organ Transplantation: Receiving an organ. Taking organs from dead bodies. Taking organs from living donors. Finding new sources of organs. Sharing out organs and sharing out costs. Thinking about the transplant movement as a whole. The Official Teaching of the Catholic Church: Before the era of organ transplantation. Pope Pius XII. Dignity of the Body. Pope John Paul II. Donations as free gift. Abuses. The Catechism of the Catholic Church. Recent teaching. Definition of death. Weighing up the Arguments: The principle of totality. Having the right attitudes. Brain death. Organ donation as Christian selfgiving. Tentative Conclusions and Unresolved Questions. Further Reading. Glossary.

The Origin of Language
Origin of Language, The

Public debate about language in the English-speaking world during the nineteenth-century turned on the issue of how language began. The notion that language was a divine gift to humanity, not shared by lower creatures, was supported by the Biblical accounts of Adam naming the animals and of the Tower of Babel. It was still accepted by leading religious authorities. But this notion was seriously brought into question by the publication of Darwin’s theory of evolution. Those who rejected Darwinism ridiculed all attempts to conjure up language out of primitive calls, grunts, and ejaculations.. On the other side were those who held that it was possible to account for the birth of language rationally as a function of the development of human communicational needs in society.

Outlines of a Philosophy of Art
Outlines of a Philosophy of Art

One of Collingwood’s earliest attempts to define the aesthetic essence of art. His aim, he writes in the preface, is to state a general conception of art and develop its consequences. His conception is one already familiar through the writings of others – “that art is as bottom neither more nor less than imagination” – but from his observation he goes on to outline the various distinctions between subordinate conceptions of art, and to attempt to demonstrate their place in the general conception, and the place of both in life. He urges that the meaningfulness of art cannot be torn from the imaginative setting in which it is embedded, and that we must attempt to explain the process by which an artist reaches a particular point of view on reality.

Outlines of the History of Greek Philosophy
Outlines of the History of Greek Philosophy

Providing an essential overview of all the main tenets of ancient Greek philosophy in one compact but comprehensive source, Zeller concentrates on four main periods of thought from before Socrates until the end of the Roman Empire. Clearly written and constructed, it includes a full bibliography and is indexed by name. First published in 1883, this classic historical work stood as the leading authority on the subject for many years and remains a useful and valuable guide. This reprints the fully revised thirteenth edition of 1931.

Papal Diplomacy
Papal Diplomacy

Pope John Paul II is not only the spiritual leader of the Roman Catholic Church, but is Head of State for the Vatican. As such, he is among the most experienced diplomats on the international scene today, having given, during the 25-year span of his pontificate, over 2,000 speeches to representatives of the UN, to 172 ambassadors accredited to the Holy See, to non-governmental entities and to inter-governmental organizations.

Perspectives on the Logic and Metaphysics of F. H. Bradley
Perspectives on the Logic and Metaphysics of F. H. Bradley

Covers all aspects of Bradley’s work on logic and metaphysics, from his critique of relational thought to his doctrine of immediate experience. Contributors include Donald Baxter, James Bradley, Richard Ingardia, James Allard, Phillip Ferreira, and others.

The Philosopher's Enigma
Philosopher's Enigma, The

In The Philosopher’s Enigma, Richard Watson explains to believers in temperate and readable prose why he and many others are not believers. His discussion is based on strict Augustinianism, the foundation of seriously argued Christianity. God is hidden – that is, the concept of God is unintelligible – as discussed at length by Leszek Kolakowski in his Religion If There Is No God (St. Augustine’s Press) – in the sense that there are no known rational arguments for God’s existence. Moreover, Augustine argues that finite human beings cannot understand God’s infinite perfections.

The Philosophical Theory of the State and Related Essays
Philosophical Theory of the State and Related Essays, The

This new edition reintroduces on the central texts of late nineteenth-century political thought. In addition to the fourth and final edition of the Philosophical Theory of the State, the editors have added a comprehensive selection of Bosanquet’s most important essays on political theory and social policy. Also added is a detailed new introduction, a guide to further reading, and an index. Together they make clear the social and political background and implications of Bosanquet’s political philosophy and allow a more complete understanding of British idealism.

Philosophy after F. H. Bradley
Philosophy after F. H. Bradley

Bradley’s rich and complex version of Absolute Idealism plays a key role not only in Idealist philosophy, politics, and ethics, but also in the development of modern logic, analytical philosophy, and pragmatism, as well as in the thinking of such figures as R. G. Collingwood and A. N. Whitehead. Topics covered include: the history of Idealism in the twentieth century; Bradley’s relation to figures such as Bernard Bosanquet, C. A. Campbell, Brand Blanshard, John Watson, John Dewey, and others; Bradley’s influence on twentieth-century empiricism, modern logic, and analytical philosophy; and his significance for contemporary debates in epistemology and ethics.

Philosophy and the Arts
Philosophy and the Arts

How can pictorial and narrative arts be usefully contrasted and compared? What in principal can be, or cannot be, communicated in such different media? Why does it seem that, at its best, artistic communication goes beyond the limitations of its own medium – seeming to think and to communicate the uncommunicable? Indeed, what kinds of thought are exercised in the pictorial and narrative arts?

Philosophy, Its Scope and Relations
Philosophy, Its Scope and Relations

This is an elementary but sophisticated account of the nature of philosophy and the relations between philosophy and other disciplines. Thought-provoking and eminently readable, it is one of the best introductions to philosophy ever written.

“I have frequently recommended the book to students taking a beginning philosophy course – and to those more advanced – and it is good to have it available again.” – Marcus Singer

Physics, Or Natural Hearing
Physics, Or Natural Hearing

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The Physics is the fundamental text in Western philosophy, as Heidegger said. The text analyzes the most common features of the natural world, such as motion, place, and time, grounding its arguments in common experience and proceeding to a proof of the prime mover.

The Platonic Myths
Platonic Myths, The

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Josef Pieper’s The Platonic Myths is the work of a scholar and philosopher whose search for the level of truth contained in the myths is carried out with a series of careful distinctions between the kinds of myths told by Plato. In the Platonic stories Plato crystallizes mythical fragments from the mere stories which contain them, and in the genuine Platonic myths he purifies the proper mythical elements, freeing them of the non-mythical elements which tend to obscure them.

The Politics of Morality
Politics of Morality, The

Here are seven readable biographical sketches of important people who influenced the times in which they lived by bringing their faith to bear on social issues. In writing about them the author incorporates biography, theology, and politics into a coherent whole portrait of the subjects. Present day journals like First Things, National Review, and Christianity Today began as an extension of the personalities of the people profiled in this book, whose interests guided faithful believers in the midst of changing and turbulent times.

Population
Population

Thomas Malthus’s An Essay on the Principle of Population, published in 1798, was a work much more widely discussed than read. This selection represents a wide range of arguments that followed this contentious work – from those who vehemently attacked Malthusian notions to those who passionately defended them. Including articles by William Cobbett, William Hazlitt, and Thomas de Quincey, this volume brings together some of the most lively contributors to the debate.

A Portrait of Aristotle
Portrait of Aristotle, A

A key introduction to Aristotle, emphasizing the importance of his biological thinking to the study of his thought. Written for students and the general reader with little prior knowledge of Aristotle, this edition features a new preface by Professor Grene.
 

Prenatal Diagnosis
Prenatal Diagnosis

“The breath of Sutton’s analysis is vast. She draws on biological, medical, legal, and sociological information. The analysis also includes a review of Roman Catholic tradition concerning abortion and canonical penalties.” Kevin T. Fitzgerald, S.J., Theological Studies

Prenatal Tests
Prenatal Tests

Introduction. Two Case Studies. Techniques, Aims and Risks: Tests to promote the health of mother and baby. Non-invasive tests. Invasive tests. Tests to detect babies with disabilities and enable abortion. Invasive tests: mother only. Invasive tests: both mother and child. A specialist test with therapeutic and nontherapeutic potential. The Church’s Teaching. A Critical Examination of the Arguments in Favour of Selective Abortion: Parental pity. Burden to society and the family. Down’s Syndrome. Burdens for parents. Inconsistent treatment. Prenatal Diagnosis — Social and Psychological Aspects: Possible psychological consequences. Ethical and social implications of prenatal diagnosis. Eugenic mentality. Conclusion. Further Reading. Glossary.

Pure Experience
Pure Experience

The radical empiricism of William James was first formally presented in his seminal papers of 1904, “Does Consciousness Exist?” and “A World of Pure Experience.” In James’s view, pure experience was to serve as the source for psychology’s primary data, and radical empiricism was to launch an effective critique of experimentalism in psychology, a critique from which the problem of experimentalism within science could be addressed more broadly. This collection of papers presents James’s formal statements on radical empiricism and a representative sample of contemporary responses from psychologists and philosophers. With only a few exceptions, these responses indicate just how badly James was misread – psychologists ignoring the heart of James’s message and philosophers transforming James’s metaphysics into something quite unintelligible to the emerging generation of experimental psychologists.

R. G. Collingwood
R. G. Collingwood

Why should modern philosophers read the works of R. G. Collingwood? His ideas are often thought difficult to locate the main lines of development taken by twentieth- century philosophy. Some have read Collingwood as anticipating the later Wittgenstein; others have concentrated exclusively on the internal coherence of his thought. This work aims to introduce Collingwood to contemporary students of philosophy through direct engagement with his arguments. It is a conversation with Collingwood that takes as its subject matter the topics that interested him – philosophy and method, the historical imagination, art and expression, action, metaphysics and life – and which still preoccupy us today.

The Reasonableness of Christianity
Reasonableness of Christianity, The

This is an indispensable document for anyone interested in the progress of Locke’s thinking about the laws of nature, morality, religion, and the limits of reason, and it is a landmark text in the history of biblical and historical theology. As fashions in philosophy turn from logical analysis to the interpretation of texts, the method that Locke employs in this work is both instructive and prescient. It was and remains a controversial text. This edition contains the two Vindications Locke wrote in response to the attacks of his critics.

Religious Freedom
Religious Freedom

One of the gravest and most divisive issues confronting the Catholic Church in recent decades – a major factor in an ongoing institutionalized rupture between Rome and at least half a million traditionalist Catholics – is the question of whether Vatican II’s Declaration Dignitatis Humanae can be reconciled with traditional Church doctrine on religious liberty.

 

 

Religious Scepticism
Religious Scepticism

On the publication of the first volume of The Decline and Fall in 1776, there arose a controversy that rapidly became broader than a dispute about an individual writer. Gibbon replied to his critics in the rhetorically brilliant Vindication in 1779, and then withdrew from the fray. But the debate continued long after that. Gibbon’s adversaries were more substantial figures than he was willing to concede, and it is Gibbon’s account of the dispute that has for the most part conditioned the work of later commentators. This comprehensive selection from the writings of Gibbon’s adversaries allows the reader to judge the critics for themselves, and so enter into one of the most important literary disputes of the eighteenth century.

Response to the Paradoxes of Malestroit
Response to the Paradoxes of Malestroit

This work addresses the particular problems of economic and financial policy, and broke new ground when it was published.

Right or Wrong
Right or Wrong

In What Happened to Notre Dame? (St. Augustine’s Press, 2009), Charles E. Rice, Professor Emeritus at Notre Dame Law School, traced that university’s loss of Catholic identity to the Land O’Lakes Declaration of 1967 in which Notre Dame and other “Catholic” universities declared their independence from the Church. 

Roads to Rome
Roads to Rome

To be a Christian is to be a convert. The word “convert” applies in a real sense both to cradle-born Catholics and to those, traditionally regarded as converts, who become Catholics as adults. The Catholic Church is the divinely established framework of the program of a conversion, which Christ presented as a thorough change of mind and heart (metanoia). While for a cradle-born Catholic the implementation of that program is usually a gradual process, for converts it contains a momentous act as they vote, so to speak, with their feet, on behalf of Truth, by joining the Church as the One True Fold, the Sole Ark of Salvation, to recall hallowed phrases dear to John Henry Newman, easily the greatest convert during the nineteenth century.

Science and Faith
Science and Faith

A selection from the Proceedings of the Fellowship of Catholic Scholars 1998 meeting on the subject of science’s intersection with faith. Contributors include Don De Marco, Charles J. Chaput, OFM CAP, Michael J. Behe, Stephen M. Barr, F. F. Centore, Germain Kopaczynski, OFM CONV., William Kilpatrick, Cynthia Toolin, and Archbishop George Pell.

Science and Method
Science and Method

One of the great mathematicians of his age, Poincaré here deals with a variety of issues of methodology: the selection of facts for study, the calculation of errors, and the use of statistical methods to compensate for errors. It also contains an attack on logicism in the foundations of mathematics, and an early account of the significance of methodology of the “new mechanics” of radioactive decay.

The Second Spring
Second Spring, The

In The Second Spring, the widely published author Joseph Bottum pens what may be the most original cultural undertaking in decades – an attempt to heal the damaged poetry of our time with an infusion of music, and an effort to strengthen the weak music of our age with an injection of poetry.

The Second Spring of the Church in America
Second Spring of the Church in America, The

Monsignor George Kelly, one of the great churchmen of our time, turns a keen but loving eye on the contemporary Church in this magnificent new book. On several notable occasions in the past, Monsignor Kelly has set before his readers the status quo of Roman Catholicism in the United States. But in this new book, he combines as never before an unclouded vision of unfortunate aspects of the contemporary Church with a robust optimism concerning what lies ahead.

Shakespearean Variations
Shakespearean Variations

In Shakespearean Variations, Ralph McInerny takes the first lines of the sonnets and their end rhymes, and composes sonnets of his own. The formal structure of the sonnet has always provided a salutary discipline for the poet – iambic pentameter, the delicate symmetry of octet and sextet, the closing couplet which epitomizes the poem. The stamp that Shakespeare put upon the form, the themes of love and death, age and youth, loyalty and betrayal, have come to seem to adhere to the very form.

Six Secular Philosophers
Six Secular Philosophers

Beck discusses the works on religion of the six philosophers he considers most germane to contemporary issues: Spinoza, Hume, Kant, Nietzsche, James, and Santayana. “I have tried to choose men whose independence of mind was such that they often appeared to their contemporaries to be enemies of religion.” He first addresses the question, What is secular philosophy? And then explains the differences between the “families” of secular philosophers, before examining both their life and works.

Some Dogmas of Religion
Some Dogmas of Religion

For most of the twentieth century, discussions of McTaggart has revolved around his notorious denial of the reality of time. Some Dogmas of Religion is a popular exposition of his philosophy that provides an accessible route into the central elements of his fuller metaphysical system without becoming embroiled with this still contentious issue. First published in 1906, this, the second edition, appeared in 1930 and includes an introduction by C. D. Broad.

The Soul of Wit
Soul of Wit, The

Poems written in what, in the debased coin of chronology, can be called the golden years are not like those written in youth. In earlier volumes, Ralph McInerny has proved that Belloc has no equal in light verse (An Abecedary) and that the Bard cannot be approximated (Shakespearian Variations). In his latest collection, The Soul of Wit, he tries his hand at a variety of forms, preferring the formal comfort of more demanding prosody.

Squandered Opportunities
Squandered Opportunities

“When statesmen forsake their own private conscience for the sake of their public duties, they lead their country by a short route to chaos.” – Thomas More, patron saint of politicians

A Study of Wittgenstein's 'Tractatus'
Study of Wittgenstein's 'Tractatus', A

Influenced by the logical positivism of Moritz , and by Russell and Ramsey, Maslow’s interpretation is that Wittgenstein’s basic philosophy is a kind of Kantian phenomenology. In this, the first critical study of the Tractatus by an American philosopher, Maslow examines Wittgenstein’s solipsism and mysticism, neglected areas of his philosophy. “One of the earliest, most neglected, and most thorough works covering several important aspects of the Tractatus.” – Plochmann and Lawson,Terms in their Propositional Contexts in Wittgenstein’s Tractatus

The Fall and Other Poems
Fall and Other Poems, The

“New England comes to flower dying,” writes J. Bottum in The Fall and Other Poems. In this powerful new collection of poetry, he argues for the centrality of winter, spring, summer, and fall – mourning their loss of meaning, celebrating their symbolic power, and finding in their cycle a figure for God’s presence in the world.

The Philosophical Orations of Thomas Reid
Philosophical Orations of Thomas Reid, The

A contemporary of David Hume, Reid was the chief figure in the group of philosophers constituting the Scottish school of common sense; he influenced Thomas Jefferson, and for the first dozen academic generations after the Revolutionary War, Reid’s philosophy served as a cornerstone of American education.

Thomas Hobbes
Thomas Hobbes

Alfred Edward Taylor (1869–1945), an international authority on Plato, here gives a useful introductory sketch of the life and thought of Hobbes. Constructed from the original texts of Hobbes and his contemporary biographers, as well as the later studies of Croom Robertson, Tönnies and Leslie Stephen, this accessible book also includes a brief account of Hobbes’s life.

“An admirable little book.” J. W. N. Watkins, in Hobbes’s System of Ideas.

True Love
True Love

From Plato and Aristotle and on to the present, many great philosophers have dealt with the nature of love, which is the most central and profound act of the person. Particularly the philosophy of the twentieth century excelled in this regard, most often inspired by the methods of essential (eidetic) analysis developed and practiced by phenomenology, particularly by realist phenomenology as represented by Max Scheler, by Dietrich von Hildebrand, whose masterwork, The Nature of Love (St. Augustine’s Press, 2009), was recently published in an excellent English translation, and by Karol Wojtyìa in his profound analysis of love in Love and Responsibility and in Man and Woman He Created Them: A Theology of the Body (1987 in Italian, 2006 in a recent translation).

The Unity of Science
Unity of Science, The

As a leading member of the Vienna Circle, Carnap’s aim was to bring about a “unified science” by applying a method of logical analysis to the empirical data of all the sciences. This work endeavors to work out a way in which the observation statements required for verification are not private to the observer. The work shows the strong influence of Wittgenstein, Russell, and Frege. This, the first English translation, was revised by Carnap for this edition.

Utilitarians and Religion
Utilitarians and Religion

This is the most complete collection ever of original writings on religion and utilitarianism. Illustrating both the sympathetic and antagonistic relationships between the principle of utility and religious beliefs in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, this is a work that no scholar of modern political thought should be without.

Veritas Divina
Veritas Divina

This book does some philosophy of religion. It takes as its point of departure what Aquinas calls divine truth (veritas divina), i.e., the collection of truths revealed to man by God. And it tries to make as clear as possible what Aquinas says about some of these revealed truths. Then it agrees or disagrees with what he says, as needed, for reasons of various sorts, whether philosophical, theological, scientific, historical, etc. – of whatever sort, just so long as they are relevant and cogent; to do these things as well as possible, if only in a small way – pro nostro modulo, as Aquinas puts it, in describing what he intends to do as the author of the Summa Contra Gentiles. Veritas Divina includes not only certain truths which are attainable by natural reason, like truths about certain aspects of the virtue of religion, of prayer, of pain and suffering, of friendship, of death; but also certain truths which are not attainable by natural reason, like truths about the Trinity, the Incarnation, the Eucharist, Purgatory, Heaven, Hell.

Voices of the New Springtime
Voices of the New Springtime

What is the future of the Catholic Church in America? This book provides a very informed answer to this question by collecting the various addresses delivered at the 25th annual convention of the Fellowship of Catholic Scholars on the subject of the "new springtime" of the Catholic faith so tirelessly preached by Pope John Paul II. The conference was keynoted by Avery Cardinal Dulles, S.J. – who at this point in his life is surely the dean of contemporary American Catholic theologians. His considered view of the Church's future ("the springtime") is ably supplemented by contributions from such veteran scholars as Elizabeth Fox-Genovese of Emory University and Robert P. George of Princeton, writing on the subject of women in the Church and religious liberty respectively. Younger figures such as Pia De Solenni of the Family Research Council and National Review's Kathryn Jean Lopez add different perspectives, on women, again, and on how the Church is impacted by the modern media. Among other speakers is the president of the Catholic University of America dealing with Catholic higher education as it is encountered today. The book thus features an up-to-date take on where the Catholic Church is headed today provided by very knowledgeable observers.

Wittgenstein and His Times
Wittgenstein and His Times

Anthony Kenny attempts to reconcile Wittgenstein’s apparently contradictory images of the nature of philosophy; McGuinness explores the similarities of method between philosophy as Wittgenstein practices it and psychoanalysis; J. C. Nyíri examines the influence on Wittgenstein of Spengler and the conservative fascination with mythology, symbolism, gesture, and ritual in Frazer’s Golden Bough, G. H. von Wright sums up Wittgenstein’s relation to his times and stresses his alienation from contemporary attitudes.

Wittgenstein
Wittgenstein

The eleven essays in this collection are of two sorts – those which present new sources for the study of Wittgenstein’s philosophy, and those which relate particular aspects of his work to that of other thinkers. Contributors include Georg Henrik von Wright, P. M. S. Hacker, Gordon Baker, and David Pears.

Aquinas on Crime
Aquinas on Crime

Not much escapes the intellect and imagination of the Angelic Doctor, St. Thomas Aquinas. Whether it be love, children, education, moral reasoning, happiness or the proper dispositions for human existence, St. Thomas seems an expert in all of it. Crime and criminal conduct are no exceptions to this general tendency with him. Not only does he have much to say about it, what he relates is perpetually fresh and surely the bedrock of what is now taken for granted. In this short treatise, the focus targets St. Thomas’s criminal codification – his law of crimes.

Religion and Philosophy
Religion and Philosophy

In this, his first book, Collingwood attempts to rescue the philosophy of religion from the efforts of psychologists to explain the human mind by empirical techniques. Here he contends that the mind can be interpreted only by introspection, and not by the methods of natural science, and tries to establish the characteristics of religion that make it unamenable to scientific analysis. This he does by asserting that religion has its closest affinity with philosophy. He believes religion and philosophy both involve an aspiration to grasp the totality of experience, whereas scientific psychology can focus only on particular motives and acts.