25% off

use the code SPRINGSALE at checkout

25% off

We Have Been Friends Together and Adventures in Grace
We Have Been Friends Together and Adventures in Grace

Raïssa Maritain (1883–1960), best known as the wife of the famous French philosopher Jacques Maritain, was a remarkable person in her own right. A poet, philosopher, translator, and mystic, she was at the epicenter of French intellectual life in the first half of the twentieth century. Her autobiography, We Have Been Friends Together, together with the second part, Adventures in Grace, were originally published in two volumes in 1941 and 1944. Both books are combined here and are now being re-issued for the first time.

We at the Center of the Universe
We at the Center of the Universe

In a work that defies category, the remarkable John Lukacs has combined science and philosophy to open our eyes to accept our need to know, our purpose for knowing, our response to the world

Aristotle on Poetics
Aristotle <em> On Poetics </em>

SPRING SALE - PAPER 25% OFF - CLOTH 50% OFF

Aristotle's much-translated On Poetics is the earliest and arguably the best treatment that we possess of tragedy as a literary form. Seth Benardete and Michael Davis have translated it anew with a view to rendering Aristotle’s text into English as precisely as possible. A literal translation has long been needed, for in order to excavate the argument of On Poetics one has to attend not simply to what is said on the surface but also to the various puzzles, questions, and peculiarities that emerge only on the level of how Aristotle says what he says and thereby leads one to revise and deepen one’s initial understanding of the intent of the argument. As On Poetics is about how tragedy ought to be composed, it should not be surprising that it turns out to be a rather artful piece of literature in its own right.

What Does "Academic" Mean?
What Does "Academic" Mean?

SPRING SALE - PAPER 25% OFF - CLOTH 25% OFF

What Does “Academic” Mean? focuses, in two essays, on the prospects of contemporary universities. The term “academic” is traced back to Plato’s Academy in a grove in Athens. The Academy is isolated, far away from the hustle and bustle of the city. Western universities founded in the Middle Ages show continuity, via Byzantium, with Plato’s Academy. Not surprisingly, the Oxford Dictionary quoted by Pieper defines “academic” as “Not leading to a decision; unpractical.”

The Platonic Myths
Platonic Myths, The

SPRING SALE - PAPER 25% OFF - CLOTH 75% OFF

Josef Pieper’s The Platonic Myths is the work of a scholar and philosopher whose search for the level of truth contained in the myths is carried out with a series of careful distinctions between the kinds of myths told by Plato. In the Platonic stories Plato crystallizes mythical fragments from the mere stories which contain them, and in the genuine Platonic myths he purifies the proper mythical elements, freeing them of the non-mythical elements which tend to obscure them.

A Disquisition on Government
Disquisition on Government, A

This volume provides the most economical and textually accurate version of Calhoun’s Disquisition available today. As a treatise, the Disquisition is one of the greatest and most enduring works of American politial thought, and a text of seminal importance to all students of American politics, history, philosophy, and law. In the Disquisition, Calhoun believed he had laid a “solid foundation for political science” through revitalizing popular rule. To complete his theoretical and practical mission, Calhoun attempts to explain the best example of the diffusion of authority and cultivation of liberty: the American Constitution. The fundamental law of the American republic provided, after all, the “interior structure” for regulating the shape and scope of government. As a guide for the states and the general government, the Constitution was also part of the “organism” that limited the centralization of authority and allowed for genuine popular rule; and it was Calhoun’s exposition of the connection between the moral demands of a properly constituted concept of popular rule and the need for practical ordering principles that is articulated in this book.

Art and Imagination
Art and Imagination

This book presents a theory of aesthetic judgment and appreciation in the spirit of modern empiricism. There are three parts: the first deals with questions of philosophical logic, the second with questions in the philosophy of mind, and the third with questions in the philosophy of art. Thus the argument advances from a theory of aesthetic judgment (and in particular of “aesthetic description”), to a theory of aesthetic appreciation, and thence to an account of the nature and value of art.

“This is an important book and one of the best to appear in a long while.” – B. R. Tilghman, Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism               

Beauteous Truth
Beauteous Truth

Beauteous Truth explores the inextricable connection between the Good, the True and the Beautiful. It is a book that makes the necessary connections between faith and reason and between theology, philosophy, history and literature. It presents a panoramic overview of Western Civilization, from Homer to Tolkien, and highlights the importance of the great figures of the Catholic cultural revival, including Newman, Wilde, Chesterton, Belloc, and C.S. Lewis. Ranging from Shakespeare to Solzhenitsyn, Beauteous Truth celebrates the marriage of sanity and sanctity, which is the fruit of the indissoluble union of fides et ratio.

Beyond Radical Secularism
Beyond Radical Secularism

This is the book that took France by storm upon its publication in the fall of 2015. It was praised by some for its rare combination of tough-mindedness and moderation and attacked by others for suggesting that radical secularism could not provide the political and spiritual resources to address the Islamic challenge. The book is even more relevant after the Parisian terror attacks of November 13, 2015. It is a book that combines permanence and relevance, that addresses a pressing political and civilizational problem in a manner that will endure.

Christian Metaphysics and Neoplatonism
Christian Metaphysics and Neoplatonism

As the only stand-alone English version of this important work – and a long-overdue critical edition – Srigley’s fluent translation is an essential bench-mark in our understanding of Camus and his place in modern thought.

Commentary on Aristotle's Physics
Commentary on Aristotle's <em>Physics</em>

SPRING SALE - PAPER ONLY

I Surf, Therefore I Am
I Surf, Therefore I Am

This is the first book about surfing ever written by a philosopher. The author, a 70-year-old surfanatic, has been Professor of Philosophy at Boston College for over 40 years and has written 50 other books on philosophy, religion, and culture. But compared to this one, the others are nothing but straw..

Ignatius of Loyola Speaks
Ignatius of Loyola Speaks

Karl Rahner, S.J. (1904–1984) ranks among the most influential theologians of our time. His contributions to the Second Vatican Council (1963–1965) shaped to a large degree the doctrinal formulations on the church, the sacraments, and the role of the laity. And his efforts at reconciling the scholastic method with an existential and anthropological understanding of humanity’s relationship with God earned him the reputation of having opened doors for ecumenical dialogue and to those outside the church.

The Latin Letters of C. S. Lewis
Latin Letters of C. S. Lewis, The

SPRING SALE - PAPER 25% OFF - CLOTH 50 % OFF

In September 1947, after reading The Screwtape Letters in Italian, Fr. Giovanni Calabria was moved to write the author, but he knew no English, so he addressed his letter in Latin. Therein began a correspondence that was to outlive Fr. Calabria himself (he died in December 1954 and was succeeded in the correspondence by Fr. Luigi Pedrollo).

Man in the Field of Responsibility
Man in the Field of Responsibility

In 1972, Karol Wojtyla, then Cardinal Archbishop of Cracow but still teaching at the Catholic University of Lublin, began work on a book on the conception and methodology of ethics that he intended to write together with his former student Tadeusz Stycze?. Although the manuscript served as the basis for further discussion between Wojty?a and his colleagues, the work remained unfinished when, in 1978, Wojtyla was elected Bishop of Rome. In 1991, Fr Stycze? decided, with the approval of Pope John Paul II, to publish the manuscript in book form. Although an Italian translation appeared in 2002, the book is appearing now for the first time in English translation.

The Modern Age
Modern Age, The

At its beginning, every age has been “modern.” We speak of “pre-” and “post-” modern ages. We are likewise tempted to identify what is most up-to-date with what is true. But to be up-to-date is to be out-of-date. If we find what is really true in any age, it will be true in all ages. This proposition is central to this book. Moreover, what is true will appear in different guises, as will what is false. The “modern age” had often considered itself relativist, or secular, or skeptical. It strove to divest itself of its theological and metaphysical backgrounds, only to find that the central themes from this tradition recur again and again, most often under political or even scientific forms.

Mystery of Being Vol. II: Faith and Reality
Mystery of Being Vol. II: Faith and Reality

The Mystery of Being contains the most systematic exposition of the philosophical thought of Gabriel Marcel, a convert to Catholicism and the most distinguished twentieth-century exponent of Christian existentialism. Its two volumes are the Gifford lectures which Marcel delivered in Aberdeen, Scotland, in 1949 and 1950. Marcel’s work fundamentally challenges most of the major positions of the atheistic existentialists (Sartre, Beauvoir, Camus), especially their belief in an absurd, meaningless, godless universe. These volumes deal with almost all of the major themes of Marcel’s thought: the nature of philosophy, our broken world, man’s deep ontological need for being, our incarnate bodily existence, primary and secondary reflection, participation, being in situation, the identity of the human self, intersubjectivity, mystery and problem, faith, hope, and the reality of God, and immortality.

Natural Law
Natural Law

Can there be universal moral principles in a culturally and religiously diverse world? Are such principles provided by a theory of natural law? Jacques response to both questions is “yes.”

The Nature of Love
Nature of Love, The

Early on Dietrich von Hildebrand distinguished himself as a thinker with an unusual understanding of human love. His books in the 1920s on man and woman broke new ground and stirred up fruitful controversy. Toward the end of his life he wrote a foundational book on love,The Nature of Love. He had in fact been preparing all his life to write this work; he was so drawn to the philosophical analysis of love that his students long ago had dubbed him doctor amoris, the doctor of love. This great work, the mature fruit of von Hildebrand’s genius, is now available for the first time in English, ably translated and introduced by the philosopher John F. Crosby, who had been a student of von Hildebrand.

Neo-Scholastic Essays
Neo-Scholastic Essays

Neo-Scholastic Essays collects some of Feser’s academic papers from the last ten years on themes in metaphysics and philosophy of nature, natural theology, philosophy of mind, and ethics. 

On the God of the Christians
On the God of the Christians

On the God of the Christians tries to explain how Christians conceive of the God whom they worship. No proof for His existence is offered, but simply a description of the Christian image of God.

A Passover Haggadah for Christians
Passover Haggadah for Christians, A

Over the past few decades an increasing number of Christians have sought to celebrate the Last Supper, which was a Passover seder, as a way of better understanding Easter. Several Passover haggadahs aimed at Christians are presently on the market. But all have sought to celebrate the Passover outside of the context of the Old Testament itself. The seders resulting from using these haggadahs are rewrites of the authentic haggadahs and do not recapture either the usage that the Jewish people have experienced throughout the ages or the Last Supper that Jesus celebrated with his Disciples.. 

Principalities and Powers
Principalities and Powers

This book is a “You Are There” approach to a portion of the Second World War, specifically the decisive years of 1942–1943. While referencing the events which are part of well-recorded history, Fr. Rutler gives a monthly commentary on them, drawn from letters, newspapers, and journals. This information might well have been lost, especially as most of these documents are rare and, having been printed on rationed paper, are deteriorating.

 

A Reading Guide to Descartes' Meditations on First Philosophy
Reading Guide to Descartes' <em>Meditations on First Philosophy</em>, A

The European Enlightenment is a period that contributed concepts that continue to be authoritative in philosophical conversation, and defined the criteria for what is important in the endeavors of human thought even in our own day. Descartes’ Meditations on First Philosophy presents the questions that are responsible for a departure from Scholasticism and the dawn of modern philosophy. To understand Continental Philosophy, and the history that precedes the analytical tradition, one cannot overlook Descartes’ precedent.

Religion If There Is No God . . .
Religion If There Is No God . . .

Leszek Kolakowski discusses, in a highly original way, the arguments for and against the existence of God as they have been conducted through the ages. He examines the critiques of religious belief, from the Epicureans through Nietzsche to contemporary anthropological inquiry, the assumptions that underlie them, and the counter-arguments of such apologists as Descartes, Leibniz, and Pascal.

Socrates Meets Descartes
Socrates Meets Descartes

Kreeft states that Socrates and Descartes are perhaps the two most important philosophers who have ever lived; they are the two who made the most difference to all philosophers after them. These two fathers of philosophy stand at the beginning of two basic philosopher options: the classical and the modern.

Kreeft focuses on seven features that unite these two major philosophers and distinguish them from all others. So this dialogue is one between the fundamental stages in the history of philosopher, the history of consciousness, and the history of Western culture.

Socrates Meets Descartes is a profound and witty reading that makes for an entertaining and insightful exploration of modern philosophy.

Socrates Meets Freud
Socrates Meets Freud

Probably no single thinker since Jesus has influenced the thoughts and lives of more people living in the Western world today than Sigmund Freud. Even agnostics like William Barrett, in Irrational Man, and atheists like Nietzsche, agree that the single most radical change in the last thousand years of Western civilization has been the decline of religion. And the four most influential critics of religion have certainly been Nietzsche, Marx, Darwin, and Freud. Of the four, Freud is by far the most popular.

Socrates Meets Kierkegaard
Socrates Meets Kierkegaard

No philosopher since Augustine had more strings to his bow than Søren Kierkegaard. He wrote from many points of view, in many literary styles, about many topics (not all of them traditional philosophical topics). He should have written novels or plays, for he turned himself into a different character every time he wrote a new book. Is there a philosopher who has ever exceeded the quantity, quality and variety of his output in such a short time?

Socrates Meets Machiavelli
Socrates Meets Machiavelli

What if we could overhear a conversation in the afterlife between Socrates and Machiavelli, in which Machiavelli has to submit to an Oxford tutorial style examination of his book conducted by Socrates using his famous method of cross-examination? How might the conversation go?

This imaginative thought-experiment makes for both imaginative drama and a good lesson in logic, in moral and political philosophy, in “how to read a book,” and in the history of early modern thought.

The Story of Western Philosophy
Story of Western Philosophy, The

This book was born of the paperback boom, and it is meant as an aid in the interpretation of the history of Western philosophy. It is designed especially for use in a course in the history of philosophy, but I hope that it may also prove useful for other purposes, such as an historical introduction to philosophy or a comprehensive review of the history of philosophy or just as a help to the general reader trying to make some sense out of the history of Western philosophy. Opening of the Preface

Summa Philosophica
Summa Philosophica

Next to the Socratic Method, the best method for organizing a logical debate over a controversial philosophical or theological issue is the method St. Thomas Aquinas uses in the Summa Theologiae. As the charm of the Socratic dialogue is its dramatic length, its uncertainty, and the psychological dimension of a clash between live characters, so the charm of the Summa method is the opposite: its condensation and its impersonality, objectivity, simplicity, directness, and logical clarity. 

Tradition
Tradition

Josef Pieper’s Tradition: Concept and Claim analyzes tradition as an idea and as a living reality in the lives and languages of ordinary people. In the modern world of constant, unrelenting change, tradition, says Pieper, is that which must be preserved unchanged. Drawing on thinkers from Plato to Pascal, Pieper describes the key elements and figures in the act of tradition and what is distinctive about it.

Where Did I Come From? Where Am I Going? How Do I Get There?
Where Did I Come From? Where Am I Going? How Do I Get There?

Where Did I Come From? Where Am I Going? How Do I Get There? is a complete course on Catholicism, featuring concise, reader-friendly, relevant prose. Straight answers are tailored for today’s generation. Topics addressed include: Can I know anything? Can I know what God is like? How am I really in the image and likeness of God? What about my conscience? Am I a gift to others? What about my freedom? Is any sexual activity OK before marriage? Do we have to keep Grandma on a feeding tube forever?