Forthcoming Books

The Sonnets of Rainer Maria Rilke
Sonnets of Rainer Maria Rilke, The

Romano Guardini described Rainer Maria Rilke as the “poet who had things of such importance to say about the end of our own age [and] was also a prophet of things to come.” The complexity of Rilke is, then, “highly relevant to modern Man.” Decades after Guardini’s assessment, the reader who rediscovers Rilke will find a depth of mind and soul that display a profundity the post-modern reader only thinks he possesses. 

Tale of a Criminal Mind Gone Good
Tale of a Criminal Mind Gone Good

In this concise and creative book, Nathan Lefler places G. K. Chesterton and René Girard in conversation on the art of being deceived. The campaign to get rid of (or mythicize) the Judaic and the Christian is not progress, it is a fog. Girard noted early on that returning preeminent status to the Judeo-Christian influence would have the (paradoxical) effect of clearing the air, such that humans might actually breathe and reason well again. 

That Which Is Just in the Church
That Which Is Just in the Church

This is not a handbook. Errázuriz presents more than the current Code of Canon Law. His intention is instead to instill a realistic perspective of ecclesial right and law, and in doing so he fills a massive exegetical gap in English scholarship. This book currently stands alone in its class and dramatically broadens the contemporary approach to ecclesiastical law. 

They Will Know Us by Our Horses
They Will Know Us by Our Horses

In addition to examples drawn from his naval background, Shenk references Homer, Shakespeare and Milton in demonstrating forestasis to be a widely useful parallel to traditional stasis. Shenk argues that both deserve to be widely taught as prime, complementary modern techniques of invention. 

The Tribulations of Sophia
Tribulations of Sophia, The

The heart of the book is entitled, “Three Lectures on Thomism and its Current Situation.” During the Second Vatican Council and its immediate aftermath, the status of Thomism in Catholic intellectual circles and institutions was vigorously challenged. Once again, the problem of Thomism emerges: What is Thomism and where does it belong? Gilson’s devotion to elaborating the nature of Christian philosophy compels him to confront this question head-on. Indeed, because Gilson approaches Thomism as the veritable model for Christian philosophy he cannot ignore the attempts to suppress or supplant it.