Ethics and Culture Conference Sale

The following titles are 30% off through the month of January. Just add the promo code ETHICS30 in the shopping cart when checking out. 

The Modern Age
Modern Age, The

At its beginning, every age has been “modern.” We speak of “pre-” and “post-” modern ages. We are likewise tempted to identify what is most up-to-date with what is true. But to be up-to-date is to be out-of-date. If we find what is really true in any age, it will be true in all ages. This proposition is central to this book. Moreover, what is true will appear in different guises, as will what is false. The “modern age” had often considered itself relativist, or secular, or skeptical. It strove to divest itself of its theological and metaphysical backgrounds, only to find that the central themes from this tradition recur again and again, most often under political or even scientific forms.

Conserving America?
Conserving America?

This collection of thematic essays by Notre Dame political theorist and public intellectual Patrick Deneen addresses the questions, is there something worth conserving in America, and if so, is America capable of conservation? Can a nation founded in a revolutionary moment that led to the founding of the first liberal nation be thought capable of sustaining and passing on virtues and practices that ennoble? Or is America inherently a nation that idolizes the new over the old, license over ordered liberty, and hedonism over self-rule? Can America conserve what is worth keeping for it to remain—or even become—a Republic?

Consciousness and Politics
Consciousness and Politics

Consciousness and Politics deals with some of the same texts discussed in two earlier books on Voegelin, Eric Voegelin and the Foundations of Modern Political Science (1999) and Beginning the Quest: Law and Politics in the Early Work of Eric Voegelin (2009). Given the appearance of so many useful discussions, especially by scholars who wrote the introductions to the several volumes of the Collected Works of Eric Voegelin that have appeared over the past decade or so, certain revisions in detail should come as no surprise. That is how science, even political science, improves.

An Intelligent Person's Guide to Modern Culture
Intelligent Person's Guide to Modern Culture, An

Received by the British press with equal acclaim and indignation, this book sets out to define and defend high culture against the world of pop, corn, and popcorn. It shows just why culture matters in an age without faith, and gives an extended argument, drawing on philosophy, criticism, and anthro-pology, against the “post-modernist” world-view. Scruton offers a penetrating attack on deconstruction, on Foucault, on Nietzschean self-indulgence, and on the “culture of repudiation” which has infected the modern academy. But his book is not only negative. It is a celebration of the true heroes of modern culture and a call to the higher life.
 

The Loss and Recovery of Truth
Loss and Recovery of Truth, The

That the United States is currently in the midst of a serious crisis, even an ideological civil war, which is part of the general and prolonged crisis of Western civilization is obvious to any thoughtful observer. One of the most perceptive observers of the development of this crisis was Gerhart Niemeyer. As a fugitive from Nazi Germany, a devout Christian, and a political theorist who had mastered the philosophical tradition and the Communist worldview, he was particularly well equipped to discern the ways in which the various modern ideologies insidiously erode the substance of truth and order in contemporary society and to seek remedies in the return to the ontological and spiritual roots of order in the Western tradition.

Tradition as Challenge
Tradition as Challenge

For Pieper, the study of tradition is anything but antiquarian. He begins with a consideration of tradition in a changing world and is well aware of the need to confront the all-too-common perception that “tradition” is nowadays irrelevant. On the basis of his profound knowledge of the Western philosophical tradition from Plato and Aristotle through Augustine, Boethius, Thomas Aquinas, and Descartes, to modern Existentialism and Marxism, Pieper is able to highlight the values established – and challenged – down through the centuries...

Ethics and Culture Conference Sale
Telling Stories that Matter
Telling Stories that Matter

The late historian Marvin O’Connell left a legacy of brilliant prose and pictures of the past, and in this book the reader at long last has access to O’Connell’s own story. Fr. Bill Miscamble, a noted historian and scholar in his own right, attributes to O’Connell the title ‘Master’ above all on account of his ability to know what matters and then write about it “in the way that all great stories are told.”

The Mystery of Communion
Mystery of Communion, The

The brevity of this work limits the amount of citations and textual references given, and Maspero instead urges the reader to study the book alongside Scripture. His manner of writing respects the impossibility of speaking of God in his immanence, but he nonetheless carves out a place for the Trinity in the human intellect, a place where the Jewish and Christian God might be encountered.

Plato's Bedroom
Plato's Bedroom

Plato’s Bedroom is a book for people who want to be better at falling in love and being in love, with all the ecstasies and dangers erotic life can bring. It is also an inviting book for readers who are intellectually playful and up for a challenge, written with verve, and full of stories thoughtful persons will find to be mirrors of their own erotic selves. Drawing on Greek myth, Plato, Shakespeare, and a wide range of modern literature and movies, the book gets Aphrodite talking with the young lovers in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and lets us listen in on Woody Allen arguing with Othello. The author’s account of how we seek, fear, avoid, and sometimes destroy love, is astonishingly fresh and engaging.

Unquiet Americans
Unquiet Americans

Before the Second Vatican Council, America’s Catholics operated largely as a coherent voting bloc, usually in connection with the Democratic Party. Their episcopal leaders generally spoke for Catholics in political matters; at least, where America’s bishops asserted themselves in public affairs there was little audible dissent from the faithful.

 

Pursuit of Unity and Perfection in Human History, The
Pursuit of Unity and Perfection in History, The

This collection of essays centers itself on a perspective of the human pursuit of unity and perfection, directly or indirectly, as objectives of intellectual endeavors, existential ideals, as social or political outcomes, and in the case of National Socialism even as perverse aberrations. Vondung’s particular treatment of Voegelin’s work likewise establishes what the former identifies as a stand-out question of this study: Does the search of order in history show us the unity of the history of humankind?

Contemplation and Kingdom
Contemplation and Kingdom

This book rises out of Dr. Kevin Hart’s 2020 Aquinas Lecture at the University of Dallas.Contemplation and  Kingdom seeks to retrieve aspects of Richard of St. Victor's treatment of contemplation, principally in De arca mystica, and does so by weighing Thomas Aquinas's reservations about this treatment in the Summa theologiæ. Is Aquinas right to object, as Augustine does in De Doctrina Christiana, that our contemplation should go directly to God and not be stalled in the consideration of the natural world? What relation is there between Jesus's preaching of the Kingdom and the contemplation of God? Is the contemplative life consistent with Jesus's injunction to love both God and neighbor? These are the principal questions considered in the book.

Good Is Love
Good Is Love, The

The arguments surrounding contraception and “good sex” seem to have set the grounds for coherently choosing a side rather than to have succeeded in presenting certain human acts as definitively immoral. As Reimers notes, a natural law position on contraception often fails to employ its greatest ally: the reality of authentic human love and “victory” of the individual in one’s sanctity as achieved through that love. This work will reorient the objectives and claims of the moral debate, as well as influence the popular notion of what love is and what it cannot be. It is an aid to scholars, students and study groups, humanists, and those who seek to deepen the sense of love’s highest physical expression.

Metaphysics of Knowledge and Politics in Thomas Aquinas, The
Metaphysics of Knowledge and Politics in Thomas Aquinas, The

Buttiglione was startlingly prescient of the problems we confront at the beginning of the third millennium. This book will spark new discussions as it explains the importance of both the medieval tradition and twentieth-century personalism. The book also draws on a wide range of secondary sources unavailable to English readers that I and will have the unique ability to introduce readers to the “Italian” way of relating speculative and political philosophy in a relatively slim volume.

Herman Melville's Ship of State
Herman Melville's Ship of State

Morrisey writes with lucidity and weaves together elements of history, literature, politics and perhaps his own affinity for Ishmael’s passenger spirit to reveal just how broad and boundless of a narrative Melville’s Moby Dick truly is.

The Decline of the Novel
Decline of the Novel, The

Told in fast-paced, engaging prose, Bottum’s Decline of the Novel is a succinct critique of classical and contemporary fiction, providing guidelines for navigating the vast genre. This book is a must-read for those who hunger for grand accounts of literature, students of literary form, critics of contemporary art, and general readers who wish to learn, finally, what we all used to know: the deep moral purpose of reading novels.

Gospel of Happiness, The
Gospel of Happiness, The

Just as Aristotelian metaphysics provided a new basis for the natural theology of Aquinas’s time, so too, positive psychology provides a basis for a natural moral theology in our own time. This book marshals the empirically verifiable findings of positive psychology that show the wisdom of the Christian tradition. Christian warnings about the dangers of greed, coveting a neighbor’s goods (social comparison), and pride find an empirical verification. Likewise, positive psychology vindicates the wisdom of Christian teaching on the importance of forgiveness, of gratitude, of humility, and of serving one’s neighbor. Moreover, positive psychology also can be a service to Christian believers by helping them in their struggles with willpower, by providing new motivations for prayer, and by helping them identify their signature strengths. Finally, this book argues, in a variety of ways, that it is folly to think that even the best of psychology can serve as a replacement for Christianity.

Being Ethical
Being Ethical

Being Ethical is fundamentally intended to serve as a sequel to D. Q. McInerny’s Being Logical (Random House, 2004), which has remained in print and has been translated into six languages. Its style lends itself to being used as a textbook in liberal studies. More generally, it is a refreshing presentation of this topic and timely and timeless exhortation to readers of the necessity of a love of virtue for ethical thought. For friends and students of Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas and Ralph McInerny, this book bears a style and manner that is both familiar and much loved.

Consensual Incapacity to Marry
Consensual Incapacity to Marry

The question of consensual incapacity is asked tens of thousands of times each year anew and there is not yet a definitive study that provides answers and guidance for further development of this notion. Another example of the longevity of this work: the manual it will effectively replace was in print for twenty years with five editions (L. Wrenn, 1970, CUA).

Witness Through Encounter
Witness through Encounter

 Witness Through Encounter intends to fulfill multiple needs. The diplomatic approach exemplified herein is singular and worthy of study among political scientists, sociologists, philosophers and diplomats eager to embrace a worldview that is more personal than simply humanistic. This work will also be useful in inter-religious settings. An additional advantage of O’Connor’s presentation of Benedict XVI’s diplomatic approach, his witness through encounter, is that it contains insight valuable to the scholar alongside the resources used.

A Basic Christian Theology
Basic Christian Theology, A

A. J. Conyers was an evangelical, Baptist theologian who helped found Truett Seminary at Baylor University. Conyers’s theology drank deeply from the wells of the Christian tradition. In this volume, he provides what he found to be the most basic elements of Christian theology and demonstrates a methodology that is biblically informed, traditionally grounded, and contextually aware. This revised edition makes this excellent work available again, with some modified study questions, additional unpublished material from Conyers’s archives, and helpful reflection and tributes from two of Conyers’s best students—Brian Brewer and Brad Green—who carry on his legacy.

The French Revolution Confronts Pius VI
French Revolution Confronts Pius VI, The

The writings of Pope Pius VI, head of the Catholic Church during the most destructive period of the French Revolution, were compiled in two volumes by M.N.S. Guillon and published in 1798 and 1800. But during the Revolution, the reign of Napoleon, and the various revolutionary movements of the 19th century, there were extraordinary efforts to destroy writings that critiqued the revolutionary ideology. Many books and treatises, if they survived the revolution or the sacking from Napoleon’s armies. To this day, no public copy of Guillon’s work exists in Paris.

Moderately Modern
Moderately Modern

Moderately Modern wears its thesis on its sleeve. Modern men and women, those thoroughly imbued with modernity’s ideas, hopes, and projects, need to moderate themselves. They need to rein themselves in, they need to think and act beyond their comfort zone. Implicit in this claim, of course, is a slew of topics, claims, and an argument. What is modernity? What’s lacking in it? Where should its adherents look outside and beyond it? What would they find? And what would a conjunction of a chastened modernity and a newly respected outside look like? It would be difficult to find someone more equipped to raise and pursue these questions than Rémi Brague.

The Mystery of Fascism
Mystery of Fascism, The

David Ramsay Steele, PhD, is a libertarian writer with a powerful underground reputation for producing caustic, entertaining, knowledgeable, and surprising arguments, often violently at odds with conventional thinking. For the first time, some of Dr. Steele’s “greatest hits” have been brought together in an anthology of provocative essays on a wide range of topics. The essays are divided into two parts, “More Popular than Scholarly” and “More Scholarly than Popular.” 

The Praise of 'Sons of Bitches'
Praise of 'Sons of Bitches', The

This book tries to return to the first obligation of the Christian, that of worshipping God. It argues that contemporary Christian thought and practice, insofar as they are moved away from the center, usually in the name of social action or ecology, have changed the essential meaning and purpose of human life in the Christian tradition.

Polity and Economy
Polity and Economy

To perceive Adam Smith’s place in the stream of Enlightenment philosophy is to gain an indispensable insight into our own condition as denizens of the liberal capitalist society. Before Smith was the author of An Inquiry into the Nature andCauses of the Wealth of Nations, he was the author of The Theory of Moral Sentiments. The earlier work establishes Smith unmistakably as among those thinkers who aspired to describe the human condition in terms of motivation, of cause and effect, thus in terms of the principles of nature itself, of nature as mechanism, not nature as edifying teleology. Precisely because morality was not to be traced to any homiletic beyond nature or to a volition with nature, the thinkers of the modern order assumed responsibility for locating the ground of true moral virtue within mechanical nature alone. And just as the locating of mankind within a remorseless system of cause and effect could be the reduction of humanity to the status of robotic slavery, it became the self-assigned task of the thinkers in question to demonstrate that the natural order was one not of etiological bondage but of freedom in an elevated sense.

Art and Imagination
Art and Imagination

This book presents a theory of aesthetic judgment and appreciation in the spirit of modern empiricism. There are three parts: the first deals with questions of philosophical logic, the second with questions in the philosophy of mind, and the third with questions in the philosophy of art. Thus the argument advances from a theory of aesthetic judgment (and in particular of “aesthetic description”), to a theory of aesthetic appreciation, and thence to an account of the nature and value of art.

“This is an important book and one of the best to appear in a long while.” – B. R. Tilghman, Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism               

The Catholic Imagination
Catholic Imagination, The

A wide-ranging and enlightening discussion on creativity within the Catholic context.

Contents

Introduction: Kenneth D. Whitehead

Keynote Address: Finding the Sacred in the Profane: Twentieth-century Catholic Literature – Robert Royal

The Beauty of the Cross: The Theological Aesthetics of Hans Urs von Balthasar – Rev. Raymond T. Gawronski, S.J.

Response to Father Raymond T. Gawronski – Larry Chapp

The Sacramental Vision of J.R.R. Tolkien – C.N. Sue Abromaitis

Sacred Architecture and the Christian Imagination – Steven J. Schloeder

Response to Stephen J. Schloeder – Catherine Brown Tkacz

Cinema: The Power of Visual Imagery – Barbara R. Nicolosi

The Music of the Spheres; or, the Metaphysics of Music – Robert R. Reilly

Response to Robert R. Reilly – Rev. Basil Cole, O.P.

The John Cardinal Wright Award Acceptance Speech – Thomas W. Hilgers, M.D.

A New Era in the Renewal of the Liturgy – Helen Hull Hitchcock

Liturgiam Authenticam and the Prospects for Authentic Liturgical Renewal – Rev. Jerry Pokorsky

The Aesthetic Understanding
Aesthetic Understanding, The

New and revised edition, with three new essays.

Brings together essays on the philosophy of art in which a philosophical theory of aesthetic judgment is tested and developed through its application to particular examples. Each essay approaches, from its own field of study, what Roger Scruton argues to be the central problems of aesthetics – what is aesthetic experience, and what is its importance for human conduct?

New essays in this edition include “The Aesthetic Endeavour Today,” “Upon Nothing” (a deconstruction of deconstruction), and “Humane Education.”

Nature's Virtue
Nature's Virtue

Virtue is not what it used to be. It has lost its good name. If virtue were a television show, it would garner low ratings and promptly be cancelled. If virtue were running for president, it would fare poorly in the Iowa caucuses and would drop out of the race after a weak showing in the New Hampshire primary. Virtue has a bad name, both because people no longer use the term and because it is associated with repression of desires. Today, it not considered healthy to keep inner urges at bay for very long. Virtue comes off looking like a relic of a quaint, narrow-minded, uptight age. Virtue does not support self-esteem since it is difficult to master the passions.

Morality: The Catholic View
Morality: The Catholic View

Fr. Servais Pinckaers’s work is well on its way to being accepted as the work on Catholic moral thinking for the coming generation of laymen and students. Pinckaers sharply distinguishes this view of morality from modern “moralities of obligation,” which regard the moral life primarily as obedience to rules that limit human freedom and curb human desires. Pinckaers sees moralities of obligation as the logical outcome of a new understanding of human freedom. Instead of regarding freedom as the capacity to engage in excellent acts of virtue (freedom for excellence), the modern view understands freedom as the radical ability to do good or evil indifferently (freedom of indifference). Pinckaers argues convincingly that this view of freedom and the morality of obligation that flows from it have impoverished the Catholic understanding of the moral life. This work offers the reader a compelling itinerary of moral development, rooted in the theology of St. Paul and the morality of the Gospels.

Virtue's End
Virtue's End

The story of Aristotelianism’s revival in recent academic moral philosophy is well known. By the middle of the twentieth century, ethical theory was dominated by versions of utilitarianism and Kantianism. Attention was paid to consequences, rules, intentions, obligations, rights, but the concerns central to an Aristotelian approach – virtue, happiness, contemplation, the summum bonum – remained little more than historical curiosities. Then, thanks to a number of perceptive authors influenced by Aristotle and Aquinas, the Aristotelian tradition regained, if not its former authoritative status, at least full respect as a viable alternative moral philosophy.

The Other Solzhenitsyn
Other Solzhenitsyn, The

This book above all explores philosophical, political, and moral themes in Solzhenitsyn’s two masterworks, The Gulag Archipelago and The Red Wheel, as well as in his great European novel In the First Circle. We see Solzhenitsyn as analyst of revolution, defender of the moral law, phenomenologist of ideological despotism, and advocate of “resisting evil with force.”

On the God of the Christians
On the God of the Christians

On the God of the Christians tries to explain how Christians conceive of the God whom they worship. No proof for His existence is offered, but simply a description of the Christian image of God.

True Love
True Love

From Plato and Aristotle and on to the present, many great philosophers have dealt with the nature of love, which is the most central and profound act of the person. Particularly the philosophy of the twentieth century excelled in this regard, most often inspired by the methods of essential (eidetic) analysis developed and practiced by phenomenology, particularly by realist phenomenology as represented by Max Scheler, by Dietrich von Hildebrand, whose masterwork, The Nature of Love (St. Augustine’s Press, 2009), was recently published in an excellent English translation, and by Karol Wojtyìa in his profound analysis of love in Love and Responsibility and in Man and Woman He Created Them: A Theology of the Body (1987 in Italian, 2006 in a recent translation).

Herbert Spencer and the Limits of the State
Herbert Spencer and the Limits of the State

Contains a representative sample of writings by the Individualists and their critics, and also by some leading Victorian politicians who attempted to translate political theories into practical politics. The debates between these thinkers raise some fundamental issues about the nature of liberty and the role and limits of the State that remain with us still. Many present-day concerns, including the issues at stake between liberals and communitarians, are to be found prefigured in the pages of this collection.

Plato's Statesman
Plato's Statesman

Rosen presents a rich and provocative analysis of the Statesman, one of Plato’s most challenging works, and contends that the main theme of the dialogue is defining the art of politics and the degree to which political experience is subject to the rule of sound judgment (phronésis) and to technical construction (techné).
 

Fix Quiet
Fix Quiet

John Poch’s fourth collection of poems, Fix Quiet, is an ambitious exploration in verse of failure, death, and a redemptive beauty found in the surprise of order.

Man in the Field of Responsibility
Man in the Field of Responsibility

In 1972, Karol Wojtyla, then Cardinal Archbishop of Cracow but still teaching at the Catholic University of Lublin, began work on a book on the conception and methodology of ethics that he intended to write together with his former student Tadeusz Stycze?. Although the manuscript served as the basis for further discussion between Wojty?a and his colleagues, the work remained unfinished when, in 1978, Wojtyla was elected Bishop of Rome. In 1991, Fr Stycze? decided, with the approval of Pope John Paul II, to publish the manuscript in book form. Although an Italian translation appeared in 2002, the book is appearing now for the first time in English translation.

A Second Look at First Things
Second Look at First Things, A

A Second Look at First Things: A Case for Conservative Politics offers in one volume, an intelligent, winsome, and readable articulation of conservative ideas on a variety of issues and questions. They range from the abstract (“Why the Natural Law Suggests a Divine Source”) to the practical (“Lincoln and the Art of Political Leadership”), and to the provocative (“Being Personal These Days: Designer Babies and the Future of Liberal Democracy”).

American Heresies and Higher Education
American Heresies and Higher Education

These closely interrelated essays explore who we think we are and what we believe we’re supposed to do as free and relational persons these days.