Author

Blanshard, Brand
On Philosophical Style
On Philosophical Style

Originally given in 1953 as the Adamson Lecture at Manchester University, On Philosophical Style has become the classic presentation of the thesis that profundity and clarity are not opposed philosophical virtues but rather required companions. Blanshard begins with the question: Why is it that philosophers of great perception sometimes confess a failure to comprehend certain of their colleagues? He ends with the assertion “that the problem of style is not a problem of words and sentences merely, but of being the right kind of mine.” In between, there is much offered, in fine style and short compass, for those who write and read philosophy. “In these few pages, Professor Blanshard has said the last word on style in philosophy. The reader is expertly conducted on a tour of inspection of all relevant areas, in and out of philosophy proper.” – Virgil C. Aldrich,The Journal of Philosophy

“Notable as probably the first book specifically on this subject by a distinguished philosopher.” –Bibliographie de la Philosophie

Bloy, Leon
The Woman Who Was Poor
The Woman Who Was Poor

Written in the 1890s, this novel has had an immeasurable effect on all European Catholic writing since. It is an extraordinary book, powerful in the manner of dos Passos, yet spiritual in the manner of the Bible.

It is the story of a woman abysmally poor, brutally treated and also exploited by her parents, living in the gutters of Paris, yet retaining the spiritual outlook and the purity of a saint. We are spared no brutality, yet there are scenes of the most tender beauty.

Bobik, Joseph
Veritas Divina
Veritas Divina

This book does some philosophy of religion. It takes as its point of departure what Aquinas calls divine truth (veritas divina), i.e., the collection of truths revealed to man by God. And it tries to make as clear as possible what Aquinas says about some of these revealed truths. Then it agrees or disagrees with what he says, as needed, for reasons of various sorts, whether philosophical, theological, scientific, historical, etc. – of whatever sort, just so long as they are relevant and cogent; to do these things as well as possible, if only in a small way – pro nostro modulo, as Aquinas puts it, in describing what he intends to do as the author of the Summa Contra Gentiles. Veritas Divina includes not only certain truths which are attainable by natural reason, like truths about certain aspects of the virtue of religion, of prayer, of pain and suffering, of friendship, of death; but also certain truths which are not attainable by natural reason, like truths about the Trinity, the Incarnation, the Eucharist, Purgatory, Heaven, Hell.

Bobik, Joseph
Jokes, Life after Death, and God
Jokes, Life after Death, and God

Jokes, Life after Death, and God has two main tasks: to try to understand exactly what a joke is, and to see whether there are any connections between jokes, on the one hand, and life after death and God, on the other hand. But it pursues other tasks as well, tasks of an ancillary sort.

Bodin, Jean
Response to the Paradoxes of Malestroit
Response to the Paradoxes of Malestroit

This work addresses the particular problems of economic and financial policy, and broke new ground when it was published.

Bodnar, Les
Carnie
Carnie

Les Bodnar is a respected orthopedic surgeon and former physician for the Notre Dame football team. His memoir, however, is from an era long before that fame, when he was 12 and 13, and a part of his father’s carnival. The romance of carnival life, of escaping the 9-5 doldrums and somehow recapturing yourself, is there, but so too the hard work and trials, the difficulty of putting on a show day after day and week after week for people who both love the show and are apprehensive of the people who put it on.

Boole, George
The Mathematical Analysis of Logic
The Mathematical Analysis of Logic

George Boole (1815–1864) is renowned as the first logician to apply algebraic methods to logic successfully. His Mathematical Analysis of Logic, first published in 1847, was the ground-breaking work that laid the foundations for what is known today as Boolean algebra and the propositional calculus. Written in response to the altercation between Sr. William Hamilton and Augustus de Morgan over the quantification of the predicate within syllogistic theory, its remarkable innovations led other logicians, among them William Stanley Jevons, John Venn, Charles Sanders Peirce, and Ernst Schröder, to refine and develop Boole’s system. In turn, their efforts were incorporated by Alfred North Whitehead and Bertrand Russell into the monumental system of Principia Mathematica. In short, modern symbolic logic was founded in the pages of this book.

Bosanquet, Bernard
Philosophical Theory of the State and Related Essays, The
The Philosophical Theory of the State and Related Essays

This new edition reintroduces on the central texts of late nineteenth-century political thought. In addition to the fourth and final edition of the Philosophical Theory of the State, the editors have added a comprehensive selection of Bosanquet’s most important essays on political theory and social policy. Also added is a detailed new introduction, a guide to further reading, and an index. Together they make clear the social and political background and implications of Bosanquet’s political philosophy and allow a more complete understanding of British idealism.

Bottum, J.
Fall and Other Poems, The
The Fall and Other Poems

“New England comes to flower dying,” writes J. Bottum in The Fall and Other Poems. In this powerful new collection of poetry, he argues for the centrality of winter, spring, summer, and fall – mourning their loss of meaning, celebrating their symbolic power, and finding in their cycle a figure for God’s presence in the world.

Bottum, Joesph
Spending the Winter
Spending the Winter

 “Poems so severely beautiful that they become unforgettable after one reading. . . . If you’re a reader who loves poetry whatever mood it’s in, just open Spending the Winter anywhere to find poems that hurt, enlighten, and delight.” —Rhina P. Espaillat, author of Rehearsing Absence and winner of the T.S. Eliot Prize

Bottum, Joseph
Second Spring, The
The Second Spring

In The Second Spring, the widely published author Joseph Bottum pens what may be the most original cultural undertaking in decades – an attempt to heal the damaged poetry of our time with an infusion of music, and an effort to strengthen the weak music of our age with an injection of poetry.

Bottum, Joseph
Decline of the Novel, The
The Decline of the Novel

Told in fast-paced, engaging prose, Bottum’s Decline of the Novel is a succinct critique of classical and contemporary fiction, providing guidelines for navigating the vast genre. This book is a must-read for those who hunger for grand accounts of literature, students of literary form, critics of contemporary art, and general readers who wish to learn, finally, what we all used to know: the deep moral purpose of reading novels.

Bouchard, Gary M.
Southwell's Sphere
Southwell's Sphere

Once feared by Queen Elizabeth I and admired by William Shakespeare, Robert Southwell, s.j. (1561–1595), clings today to a thinning canonical presence in English literature among a sphere of other writers incongruously called the metaphysical poets. Southwell’s Sphere lifts this sixteenth century Jesuit priest and prolific writer from the obscurity in which he too often resides and places him instead at the center of a sphere of English poets upon whom his life and works exerted an observable influence.

Boyle, John F.
Master Thomas Aquinas and the Fullness of Life
Master Thomas Aquinas and the Fullness of Life

Professor John F. Boyle’s lecture, Master Thomas Aquinas and the Fullness of Life, is a piece that combines a profoundly personal element – the experience of someone who has chosen St. Thomas as his own teacher and master – with the learnedness of one of the most respected contemporary American scholars of the thought of Thomas Aquinas. What we are offered in Professor Boyle’s lecture is not the kind of arid and lifeless speculation that is sometimes – albeit mistakenly – associated with Aquinas’s own style. Boyle emphasizes that Aquinas was far from being a “brain on a stick,” a theologian and thinker so deeply immersed in speculation as to lose sight of the real world, and indeed of what matters in the real world. For what matters in the real world is life, and our ability to conduct this life is a way that is in accordance with the deepest longings of human nature. Boyle demonstrates, with both learning and wit, that it is precisely this life, in its fullness, to which St. Thomas endeavors to lead his students through his teaching. This life has its roots in the humble operations of living that we share with creatures such as plants and animals; it rises to the properly human level in the self-direction of which we are capable through intellect and will, and which enables us to form ourselves morally in habits that become “second natures” for us; and it is perfected in the supernatural life of faith in which Christ becomes our teacher and master, who leads us to eternal life with his Father.

Bradley, Gerard V.
Essays on Law, Religion, and Morality
Essays on Law, Religion, and Morality

The most controversial foundational issue today in both legal philosophy and constitutional law is the relationship between objective moral norms and the positive law. Is it possible for the state to be morally “neutral” about such matters as marriage, the family, religion, religious liberty, and – as the Supreme Court once famously phrased it – “the meaning of life”? If such neutrality is possible, is it desirable?

Bradley, Gerard V.
Unquiet Americans
Unquiet Americans

Before the Second Vatican Council, America’s Catholics operated largely as a coherent voting bloc, usually in connection with the Democratic Party. Their episcopal leaders generally spoke for Catholics in political matters; at least, where America’s bishops asserted themselves in public affairs there was little audible dissent from the faithful.

 

Bradley, Gerard V., J.D. and De Marco, Don
Science and Faith
Science and Faith

A selection from the Proceedings of the Fellowship of Catholic Scholars 1998 meeting on the subject of science’s intersection with faith. Contributors include Don De Marco, Charles J. Chaput, OFM CAP, Michael J. Behe, Stephen M. Barr, F. F. Centore, Germain Kopaczynski, OFM CONV., William Kilpatrick, Cynthia Toolin, and Archbishop George Pell.

Bradley, James, editor
Philosophy after F. H. Bradley
Philosophy after F. H. Bradley

Bradley’s rich and complex version of Absolute Idealism plays a key role not only in Idealist philosophy, politics, and ethics, but also in the development of modern logic, analytical philosophy, and pragmatism, as well as in the thinking of such figures as R. G. Collingwood and A. N. Whitehead. Topics covered include: the history of Idealism in the twentieth century; Bradley’s relation to figures such as Bernard Bosanquet, C. A. Campbell, Brand Blanshard, John Watson, John Dewey, and others; Bradley’s influence on twentieth-century empiricism, modern logic, and analytical philosophy; and his significance for contemporary debates in epistemology and ethics.

Brague, Remi
Eccentric Culture
Eccentric Culture

Western culture, which influenced the whole world, came from Europe. But its roots are not there. They are in Athens and Jerusalem. European culture takes its bearing from references that are not in Europe: Europe is eccentric.

Brague, Rémi
Legitimacy of the Human, The
The Legitimacy of the Human

The Legitimacy of the Human presents itself as a satellite work to a more voluminous effort by Rémi Brague, The Kingdom of Man. The larger book argues the thesis of the increasingly visible failure of the modern project, founded upon a view of man as thoroughly emancipated and autonomous, his own sovereign and the world’s. This is most visible in our technological powers and predicaments, with their ever-growing capacity to destroy or fundamentally transform our humanity, but understandings of freedom and equality unable to justify themselves before the bar of reason, but willfully asserting themselves, complement the picture.

Brague, Remi
On the God of the Christians
On the God of the Christians

On the God of the Christians tries to explain how Christians conceive of the God whom they worship. No proof for His existence is offered, but simply a description of the Christian image of God.

Brague, Rémi
Anchors in the Heavens, The
The Anchors in the Heavens

What Brague offers us here is not a narrative of decline, not a Jeremiad, not a nostalgic lament for the thought-world of a bygone era, but a sympathetic outline of some of the major tensions in the philosophical underpinnings of the modernity that we all inhabit. As such, it forms a part of his ongoing effort take modernity “more seriously than it takes itself”, to expose its hidden foundations, and to push it to its logical conclusions. In so doing, he hopes to help clarify where it is that we are going as a species, and to ensure that wherever it is, there is room for us humans in it.

Brague, Rémi
Moderately Modern
Moderately Modern

Moderately Modern wears its thesis on its sleeve. Modern men and women, those thoroughly imbued with modernity’s ideas, hopes, and projects, need to moderate themselves. They need to rein themselves in, they need to think and act beyond their comfort zone. Implicit in this claim, of course, is a slew of topics, claims, and an argument. What is modernity? What’s lacking in it? Where should its adherents look outside and beyond it? What would they find? And what would a conjunction of a chastened modernity and a newly respected outside look like? It would be difficult to find someone more equipped to raise and pursue these questions than Rémi Brague.

Breynaert, Françoise
Second Coming of Christ, The
Second Coming of Christ, The

Compelling theological questions converge with contemporary concerns in Françoise Breynaert's exposition of the doctrine surrounding Christ's second coming. Why must Christ come again? What will become of this earth as the dominion of man is more and more power concentrated in the hands of the few? Ideologies associated with the pursuit of power promise salvation––of the world, the planet, of humanity itself––through politics, technology, and science. But Breynaert draws answers to both questions instead from Scripture and with this book prepares us for what lies ahead. She points to the spiritual journey that is humanity's true destiny, along which man will encounter the temptation to accept the claims of power and its promises of fulfillment in this life, and the traps laid for the man who does not wish to be challenged for the victory of his soul. Breynaert's account of the second coming and the false promises of today's world also remind us of the assurances given in Scripture for mercy and triumph, an optimism that offers much needed strength of spirit.

Bruell, Christopher
Aristotle as Teacher
Aristotle as Teacher

This book is an account of Aristotle’s Metaphysics. The work is considered as a whole and each of its parts or books is taken up in the order that it has in the traditional text. The book is based on an examination of all of the manuscript readings reported in the three most recent editions of the work (those of Christ, Ross, and Jaeger), and it attempts in this way and others to come as close as possible to what would have been the original text. The Metaphysics is of course a much-studied work. What distinguishes this new effort to understand it is the working assumption that Aristotle presents in it his most comprehensive reflection on science: its character and aims, its foundations or presuppositions, and the obstacles or objections that constitute a challenge to its possibility.

Burger, Ronna
Phaedo, The
The Phaedo

Since antiquity the Phaedo has been considered the source of “the twin pillars of Platonism” – the theory of ideas and the immortality of the soul. Burger’s attempt to trace the underlying argument of the work as a whole leads to a radical rethinking of the status of those doctrines.

Burger, Ronna and Goodin, Patrick, editors
Eccentric Core, The
The Eccentric Core

This volume is a tribute to Seth Benardete by contributors who had the rare good fortune of studying with him or who discovered the treasure of his writings. The collection originated with a memorial conference on “The Thought of Seth Benardete” in the spring of 2005 at Howard University. It expanded to include papers from an earlier memorial conference at the New School for Social Research in December 2002 as well as reviews of his books published over the years. The essays about or inspired by Benardete’s thought—on the Bible and Homer, the pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle and the Roman writers—suggest the remarkable range of his teaching and studies. The centrality of Plato is evident not only in these essays but also in the reviews, by readers who appreciate the importance of Benardete’s work, its subtlety and its depth. The volume closes with three of Benardete’s previously unpublished essays and a bibliography of his writings.

Buttiglione, Rocco
Metaphysics of Knowledge and Politics in Thomas Aquinas, The
Metaphysics of Knowledge and Politics in Thomas Aquinas, The

Buttiglione was startlingly prescient of the problems we confront at the beginning of the third millennium. This book will spark new discussions as it explains the importance of both the medieval tradition and twentieth-century personalism. The book also draws on a wide range of secondary sources unavailable to English readers that I and will have the unique ability to introduce readers to the “Italian” way of relating speculative and political philosophy in a relatively slim volume.

Cain, Peter, editor
Empire and Imperialism
Empire and Imperialism

The 1870s is a key decade in the evolution of British thinking about the nature, purpose, and future of empire. Increasing economic competition began to disturb the complacent assumption about Britain's leadership in technology and in the world economy. The growth of other countries, most notably the United States and Germany, put in question Britain's survival as a great power. These changes set in motion a reappraisal of Britain's empire and its importance to the motherland, and a heated debated as to whether colonialism and imperialism were a burden rather than a benefit to Britain. The discussion of the 1870s set the agenda for the debates of the next half-century. This volume documents the writing central to the debate; it includes contributions b such leading British thinkers and statesmen as J. A. Froude, Robert Lowe, Edward Dicey, Frederic Seebohm, Lord Carnarvon, Gladstone, Julius Vogel, and Lord Blanchford.

Calhoun, John. C.
Disquisition on Government, A
A Disquisition on Government

This volume provides the most economical and textually accurate version of Calhoun’s Disquisition available today. As a treatise, the Disquisition is one of the greatest and most enduring works of American politial thought, and a text of seminal importance to all students of American politics, history, philosophy, and law. In the Disquisition, Calhoun believed he had laid a “solid foundation for political science” through revitalizing popular rule. To complete his theoretical and practical mission, Calhoun attempts to explain the best example of the diffusion of authority and cultivation of liberty: the American Constitution. The fundamental law of the American republic provided, after all, the “interior structure” for regulating the shape and scope of government. As a guide for the states and the general government, the Constitution was also part of the “organism” that limited the centralization of authority and allowed for genuine popular rule; and it was Calhoun’s exposition of the connection between the moral demands of a properly constituted concept of popular rule and the need for practical ordering principles that is articulated in this book.

Camus, Albert
Christian Metaphysics and Neoplatonism
Christian Metaphysics and Neoplatonism

As the only stand-alone English version of this important work – and a long-overdue critical edition – Srigley’s fluent translation is an essential bench-mark in our understanding of Camus and his place in modern thought.

Capaldi, Nicholas N. and Malloch, Theodore Roosevelt
America's Spiritual Capital
America's Spiritual Capital

Spiritual capital is the fund of beliefs, examples, and commitments that are transmitted from generation to generation through a religious tradition, and which attach people to the transcendent source of fulfillment and happiness. America has created the greatest civilization the world has ever known, and it has done this because of its spiritual capital, the values and beliefs by which individual Americans have interpreted and transformed the world. The Judeo-Christian heritage has historically served as the spiritual capital of America.

WATCH NEWSMAX.TV'S INTERVIEW WITH CO-AUTHOR, THEODORE ROOSEVELT MALLOCH HERE.

Carnap, Rudolf
Unity of Science, The
The Unity of Science

As a leading member of the Vienna Circle, Carnap’s aim was to bring about a “unified science” by applying a method of logical analysis to the empirical data of all the sciences. This work endeavors to work out a way in which the observation statements required for verification are not private to the observer. The work shows the strong influence of Wittgenstein, Russell, and Frege. This, the first English translation, was revised by Carnap for this edition.

Catholic Bishops' Joint Committee on Bioethical Issues, The
Genetic Intervention on Human Subjects
Genetic Intervention on Human Subjects

“[This book] will be of immense interest to all ethicists, regardless of whether or not they are involved in human genetic intervention, or are Roman Catholic. . . .

Chatalian, George
Epistemology and Skepticism
Epistemology and Skepticism

Convinced that epistemology and philosophy in general have gone astray in the twentieth century, Chatalian sought to restore the classical tradition in both, in part by marshalling a mass of data about philosophical skepticism, data which taken as a whole are not to be found in any other work.

Churchill, Winston S.
Savrola
Savrola

Savrola is Winston Churchill’s first major literary effort and his only full-length work of fiction. Published in 1900, the novel’s subtitle, A Tale of the Revolution in Laurania, reflects the story’s modern political focus. Laurania, a long-established republic, is subjected to the autocratic rule of President Antonio Molara, a former general who has become known as the Dictator. Savrola, the man of the multitude, leads the democratic effort to restore the political liberties of the people. When the register of eligible electors is mutilated and the popular franchise compromised, a riot breaks out and the stage is set for a fight to the death between Molara and Savrola over who will rule Laurania. General Molara enlists the assistance of his beautiful wife, Lucile, to undermine Savrola’s influence with the people. But Lucile falls in love with Savrola, who is equally moved by the beauty and charm of the First Lady. As is indicated by the last chapter’s title, “Life’s Compensations,” all ends well in Laurania. After the violent troubles of the revolution, Molara is dead, Lucile and Savrola are united, and the Mediterranean republic returns to peace and prosperity.

Churchill, Winston S.
River War, The
The River War

After more than 121 years, Winston Churchill’s The River War is finally available again, unabridged in two volumes. The editor, Jim Muller, worked on this definitive new edition for almost 32 years.

 

The River War is currently out of stock, but should be available in late Spring/early Summer.

 

“… a towering work of scholarship and one of the most remarkable books to appear in many, many years.”

            —Andrew Roberts, in The Wall Street Journal 

Cleary, John J.
Aristotle on the Many Senses of Priority
Aristotle on the Many Senses of Priority

Discusses the origin, development, and use of the many senses of priority as a central thesis in Aristotle’s metaphysics, and argues that the concept of priority is central to understanding Aristotle’s ambiguous relationship in Platonism.

Coates, Paul and Hutto, Daniel D.
Current Issues in Idealism
Current Issues in Idealism

Focused on the idealist/realist dispute, contributors also discuss the relation of idealism to ethics, metaphysics, and epistemology. The volume also deals with the distinctions between ontological and conceptual forms of idealism, the place of idealism within the analytic tradition of philosophy, and the coherence of the idealist/realist distinction. Contributors include: Donald Davidson, Tom Sorrell, T. L. S. Sprigge, Phillip Ferreira, et al.

Collingwood, R. G.
Essay on Philosophical Method, An
An Essay on Philosophical Method

“My best book in matter; in style, I may call it my only book.” – R. G. Collingwood

Collingwood, R. G.
Religion and Philosophy
Religion and Philosophy

In this, his first book, Collingwood attempts to rescue the philosophy of religion from the efforts of psychologists to explain the human mind by empirical techniques. Here he contends that the mind can be interpreted only by introspection, and not by the methods of natural science, and tries to establish the characteristics of religion that make it unamenable to scientific analysis. This he does by asserting that religion has its closest affinity with philosophy. He believes religion and philosophy both involve an aspiration to grasp the totality of experience, whereas scientific psychology can focus only on particular motives and acts.

Collingwood, R. G.
Outlines of a Philosophy of Art
Outlines of a Philosophy of Art

One of Collingwood’s earliest attempts to define the aesthetic essence of art. His aim, he writes in the preface, is to state a general conception of art and develop its consequences. His conception is one already familiar through the writings of others – “that art is as bottom neither more nor less than imagination” – but from his observation he goes on to outline the various distinctions between subordinate conceptions of art, and to attempt to demonstrate their place in the general conception, and the place of both in life. He urges that the meaningfulness of art cannot be torn from the imaginative setting in which it is embedded, and that we must attempt to explain the process by which an artist reaches a particular point of view on reality.

Congdon, Lee
Baseball and Memory
Baseball and Memory

In this historical/philosophical reflection, Lee Congdon writes of the ways in which baseball spurs memory. This is particularly important at a time when many Americans suffer from a form of amnesia that renders them defenseless in the face of concerted efforts to seize possession of the past. “Who controls the past controls the future,” George Orwell wrote in Nineteen Eighty-Four, “who controls the present controls the past.” Baseball can, and does, stand in the way of those whose ambition it is to gain and maintain power by pretending that memory cannot be trusted; what was once thought to be “the past” was merely a fiction that served the interests of a ruling class.

Conyers, A. J.
Eclipse of Heaven
Eclipse of Heaven

We live in a world no longer under heaven. At least in most people’s minds and imaginations that vision of reality has become little more than a caricature, conjuring up the saints and angels of baroque frescoes. And in the church only a hint remains of the power it once exercised in the hearts of believers.

Conyers suggests that the eclipse of heaven has resulted in a shallower view of life and death, in a loss of cultural and individual purpose, and in moral disarray. This is a powerful, persuasive plea to stop blocking heaven from our sight, and so to regain hope, meaning, and richer lives – in this world and the one to come.

“Conyers’s analysis of the malaise afflicting both church and society is matched by an equally sensitive conviction concerning the availability of spiritual resources that can ennoble and uplift the human situation. This is a good book that will do good.” – Bruce M. Metzger, Princeton Theological Seminary

“Conyers’s book cries, ‘Read me for heaven’s sake!’ Read, weep and become part of the solution to a problem we must address or die.” – Calvin Miller

Conyers, A. J.
Last Things
Last Things

The Bible teaching on the end times have long been a source of sometimes morbid fascination for Christians. And now, at the turn of another millennium, we are seeing renewed bouts of predictions fever. Amid the frenzy, how can we take end-times teachings seriously and understand them clearly?

Conyers, A. J.
Basic Christian Theology, A
A Basic Christian Theology

A. J. Conyers was an evangelical, Baptist theologian who helped found Truett Seminary at Baylor University. Conyers’s theology drank deeply from the wells of the Christian tradition. In this volume, he provides what he found to be the most basic elements of Christian theology and demonstrates a methodology that is biblically informed, traditionally grounded, and contextually aware. This revised edition makes this excellent work available again, with some modified study questions, additional unpublished material from Conyers’s archives, and helpful reflection and tributes from two of Conyers’s best students—Brian Brewer and Brad Green—who carry on his legacy.

Cooper, Barry
Consciousness and Politics
Consciousness and Politics

Consciousness and Politics deals with some of the same texts discussed in two earlier books on Voegelin, Eric Voegelin and the Foundations of Modern Political Science (1999) and Beginning the Quest: Law and Politics in the Early Work of Eric Voegelin (2009). Given the appearance of so many useful discussions, especially by scholars who wrote the introductions to the several volumes of the Collected Works of Eric Voegelin that have appeared over the past decade or so, certain revisions in detail should come as no surprise. That is how science, even political science, improves.

Cottingham, John
Rationalism
Rationalism

This concise survey, accessible to students and general readers alike, traces the main elements of rationalism from the classical period to the present day. It contains a lucid account of the arguments of the great seventeenth-century rationalists, Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz, on scientific knowledge, mind and body, and freedom and necessity, and compares these with the empiricist counter-arguments of Locke and Hume, culminating in the great synthesis of Kant. Later sections discuss the ideas of Hegel, Russell, Wittgenstein, Ayer, Quine, Kripke, Chomsky, and Popper, along with rationalist and anti-rationalist elements in modern ethics.

Cowan, Bainard
Gained Horizons
Gained Horizons

Gained Horizons takes up Pope Benedict XVI’s invitation, issued in his lecture at the University of Regensburg, to enter into the dialogue of cultures by “broadening our concept of reason” to “once more disclose its vast horizons.” Benedict placed in the foreground the notion of God as acting with reason, and said of “this great logos, this breadth of reason,” that “to rediscover it constantly is the great task of the university.” The contributors to Gained Horizons conduct their inquiries down the paths of their disciplines of thought – philosophy, theology, political thought and literary criticism – examining the broader nature of reason and the forces that oppose it today in politics, culture, and education.

Crimmins, James E.
Utilitarians and Religion
Utilitarians and Religion

This is the most complete collection ever of original writings on religion and utilitarianism. Illustrating both the sympathetic and antagonistic relationships between the principle of utility and religious beliefs in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, this is a work that no scholar of modern political thought should be without.