Author

Poch, John
Fix Quiet
Fix Quiet

John Poch’s fourth collection of poems, Fix Quiet, is an ambitious exploration in verse of failure, death, and a redemptive beauty found in the surprise of order.

Poch, John
God's Poems
God's Poems

Poetry is exciting, but elusive to most. This is troublesome for Christians because the Bible, John Poch reminds us, is largely composed of poetical verse. In God’s Poems, Poch re-introduces sacred text as purposefully poetic, and explains what that means and invites the reader to with this insight live more thoughtfully and beautifully. 

Podles, Leon J.
Losing the Good Portion
Losing the Good Portion

Losing the Good Portion: Why Men Are Alienated from Christianity explores the causes and consequences of the almost millennium-old disparity between the participation of lay men and lay women in the churches of Western Christianity. Podles considers both the anecdotal and statistical evidence for the lack of men: sermons, church rolls, censuses, and sociological analyses.

Poincaré, Henri
Science and Method
Science and Method

One of the great mathematicians of his age, Poincaré here deals with a variety of issues of methodology: the selection of facts for study, the calculation of errors, and the use of statistical methods to compensate for errors. It also contains an attack on logicism in the foundations of mathematics, and an early account of the significance of methodology of the “new mechanics” of radioactive decay.

Poinsot, John (AKA John of St. Thomas)
Tractatus de Signis
Tractatus de Signis

This is a corrected second impression of the original bilingual critical edition of Poinsot’s work on signs completed in 1632 but not brought to independent publication until 1985 in the edition prepared by John Deely in collaboration with Ralph Austin Powell. Besides a new “Foreword” by the translator and an errata sheet, we have some new materials and a full table of correlations between the independent Tractatus edition and the original Cursus Philosophicus volumes from which that edition was established.

Pontuso, James. F.
Nature's Virtue
Nature's Virtue

Virtue is not what it used to be. It has lost its good name. If virtue were a television show, it would garner low ratings and promptly be cancelled. If virtue were running for president, it would fare poorly in the Iowa caucuses and would drop out of the race after a weak showing in the New Hampshire primary. Virtue has a bad name, both because people no longer use the term and because it is associated with repression of desires. Today, it not considered healthy to keep inner urges at bay for very long. Virtue comes off looking like a relic of a quaint, narrow-minded, uptight age. Virtue does not support self-esteem since it is difficult to master the passions.

Pope John Paul II
John Paul II LifeGuide, The
The John Paul II LifeGuide

The late Pope John Paul II’s words and life have inspired millions of people. Here, in one handy and easy-to-use guide, are some of the most memorable and inspiring quotes encompassing all of John Paul’s long life, grouped around principal categories such as human love, creation, suffering, human life/Gospel of life, the person, time and eternity, faith and reason, love of country, and many more, plus a careful, detailed subject index and quotable-line index.

Pouivet, Roger
After Wittgenstein, St. Thomas
After Wittgenstein, St. Thomas

In this slender volume Roger Pouivet advances an arresting argument. He asserts that the work of the later Wittgenstein can help us discern the lasting value of Thomas Aquinas’s philosophical anthropology. He also holds that Aquinas can
help the reader avoid an influential misreading of Wittgenstein. Pouivet draws on the work of Elizabeth Anscombe, Peter Geach, and Anthony Kenny to advance this twofold argument.

Pryce-Jones, David
Fault Lines
Fault Lines

Born in Vienna in 1936, David Pryce-Jones is the son of the well-known writer and editor of the Times Literary Supplement Alan Pryce-Jones and Therese “Poppy” Fould-Springer. He grew up in a cosmopolitan mix of industrialists, bankers, soldiers, and playboys on both sides of a family, embodying the fault lines of the title: “not quite Jewish and not quite Christian, not quite Austrian and not quite French or English, not quite heterosexual and not quite homosexual, socially conventional but not quite secure."

Pyle, Andrew
Atomism and Its Critics
Atomism and Its Critics

A substantial and in-depth study of the history of the atomic theory of matter between the time of Democritus and that of Newton. It is the first to emphasize the continuity of the atomic debate and the debt owed by the seventeenth-century “moderns” to the medieval critique of Aristotle. 

Pyle, Andrew, editor
Population
Population

Thomas Malthus’s An Essay on the Principle of Population, published in 1798, was a work much more widely discussed than read. This selection represents a wide range of arguments that followed this contentious work – from those who vehemently attacked Malthusian notions to those who passionately defended them. Including articles by William Cobbett, William Hazlitt, and Thomas de Quincey, this volume brings together some of the most lively contributors to the debate.

Pyle, Andrew, editor
Liberty
Liberty

Mill’s On Liberty has turned out to be, as he predicted, the most widely read and long-lasting of his writings. It has proved, however, extremely difficult to pin Mill down to any definite political doctrines. His contemporaries clearly had the same problems as have beset modern commentators. Some portray Mill as a dangerous revolutionary, a latter-day Jacobin; others see him as peddling mere platitudes. Was he aiming to preach Pyrrhonism, undermine the Church, and dissolve social bonds; or were his principles already informing the thought and practice of Victorian Britain?

Pyle, Andrew, editor
Agnosticism
Agnosticism

Until the nineteenth century, thinkers who entertained doubts about the existence of God were branded “atheists” and “infidels,” and were subject to persecutions. But in the late nineteenth-century Britain a group of highly respectable thinkers emerged who argued for the radical conclusion that theology is impossible, and that we humans cannot know what, if anything, lies behind the veil of appearances. This volume provides extracts of the best-known agnostics (Spencer, Huxley, Stephen, Clifford, and Tyndall), and their less well-known theological opponents. The debate marks a major turning point in Western attitudes toward religious belief; the burden of proof was henceforth firmly placed on the shoulders of the theologians.

Rahner, Karl
Encounters with Silence
Encounters with Silence

One of the classics of modern spirituality, Encounters with Silence is one of Karl Rahner’s most lucid and powerful books. A book of meditations about man’s relation with God, it is not a work of dry theology, but rather a book of prayerful reflections on love, knowledge, and faith, obedience, everyday routines, life with our friends and neighbors, our work and vocation, and human goodness. The immense success of this moving work is a tribute to its practicality and the ability of the great theologian to speak simply and yet profoundly to ordinary men and women seeking an inspiring guide to the inner life, one that never forsakes the world of reality. The book is cast in the form of a dialogue with God that moves from humble but concerned inquiry to joyful contemplation.

Rahner, Karl
Spiritual Exercises
Spiritual Exercises

The subject matter is, of course, very controversial. Has St. Ignatius anything to say for modern Christians? Jesuits the world over maintain that he has, others suggest that his writing is totally confined to a particular, and unfortunate, period of Church history. Karl Rahner has been compelled to write with a force and simplicity we do not usually associate with him. Here is a compelling series of meditations which take us out of the stodgy surroundings of so much Christian spirituality, and certainly one of Rahner’s greatest works.

Rahner, Karl S.J.
Ignatius of Loyola Speaks
Ignatius of Loyola Speaks

Karl Rahner, S.J. (1904–1984) ranks among the most influential theologians of our time. His contributions to the Second Vatican Council (1963–1965) shaped to a large degree the doctrinal formulations on the church, the sacraments, and the role of the laity. And his efforts at reconciling the scholastic method with an existential and anthropological understanding of humanity’s relationship with God earned him the reputation of having opened doors for ecumenical dialogue and to those outside the church.

Ranasinghe, Nalin
Logos and Eros
Logos and Eros

Included here are twenty essays from renowned scholars, honoring Stanley Rosen, whose work in ancient and modern philosophy is among the most influential today. Rosen is the author of fourteen books, including nine from St. Augustine’s Press.

Ranasinghe, Nalin
Socrates in the Underworld
Socrates in the Underworld

This is the first full-length monograph to address the religious, ethical, and political dimensions of Plato’s Gorgias. The third longest and most serious dialogue has long been neglected because of the disconcerting moral and psychic demands it makes on its readers. Yet such a personal appropriation, equivalent to taking the uncanny daimon of Socrates back to one’s cave or body, is the key to understanding the philosopher’s paradoxical claim that nobody deliberately chooses to do evil. The dramatic action of the Gorgias shows how angry and insecure men can be led by demagogic rhetoric to perform violent and thoughtless deeds. The repeated performance of such actions has the effect of blinding their judgment to the extent that they truly know not what they do. Deliberately using the disastrous demagogue-driven Peloponnesian War as the backdrop for the Gorgias, Plato suggests that only Socrates practiced the true political art. This art seems to consist of undoing the insidious effects of rhetoric and making persons aware of the great potential for virtue and beauty present in their souls. Indeed, Socrates must be recognized as the discoverer of the human soul’s strange power to transcend mimetic coercion and physical necessity. Lacking this vital self-knowledge, men live like dead souls in Hades – ruled by slanderous stories and seductive shadows. The Gorgias gives us Plato’s fullest speculative re-construction of the worldview presupposed by Socrates’ ironic words and noble deeds.

Ranasinghe, Nalin
Socrates and the Gods
Socrates and the Gods

Socrates’ distinctive take on the gods is essential to understanding the meaning of Socrates’ life, death, and self-proclaimed divine mission. The Euthyphro shows how Socrates overturns Homeric religion in a way that subtly but definitively establishes the philosophical basis of Christian Revelation. Determined to allow the Apology of Socrates to speak for itself, Plato uses the persona of Euthyphro, who almost certainly did not exist, to represent Meletus and the problem of religious literalism in a godless age. Socrates’ reinterpretation of Homer is shown to overcome the pervasive Oedipal antagonisms of the Iliad and bequeath posterity a healthier view of the respective roles played by divine and human elements in the Cosmos.

Ranasinghe, Nalin
Confessions of Odysseus
The Confessions of Odysseus

Nalin Ranasinghe undertakes the monumentally brash assignment of accusing man and then offering his defense, precisely as Homer does of Odysseus in the Iliad. Odysseus is portrayed as a human being deserving of both. For this reason and Homer’s perceptive descriptions, Ranasinghe claims Homer’s epic is the cornerstone of Western civilization. The central insights herein compel Ranasinghe to admit the necessity of heeding its lessons today, of minding its characters and seeing them in action off the page and in our own world.

Ranasinghe, Nalin
Shakespeare's Reformation
Shakespeare's Reformation

This is a posthumously published collection of Nalin Ranasinghe's sharp analyses of Shakespeare's five heavy dramas: Hamlet, King John, Julius Caesar, King Lear, and Antony and Cleopatra. True to form, Ranasinghe serves up philosophical and literary genius for the reader's benefit and delight.

Raphael, Frederic and Epstein, Joseph
Where Were We?
Where Were We?

Frederic Raphael, the English novelist, screenwriter, and man of letters, and Joseph Epstein, the American essayist, short-story writer, and literary critic, exchanged e-mails sporadically over the years, usually commenting on each other’s various writings. Then one day in 2009, Raphael wrote to Epstein to suggest that, since they enjoyed a benevolence toward each other unusual among literary men, they begin an exchange of e-mail correspondence on a regular basis. His thought was that, at the end of a year or so, the result might be an interesting book. Epstein, who had long admired Raphael’s writing, agreed.

Reeder, John, editor
On Moral Sentiments
On Moral Sentiments

Spanning over one hundred years of critical responses, the collection includesthree different sections: the initial reply from Smith’s friends David Hume, Edmund Burke, and William Robertson; the more considered opinions put forward by Smith’s contemporaries, such as Lord Kames, Thomas Reid, Adam Ferguson, and Dugald Stewart; and the later nineteenth-century, largely critical, views expressed by a new generation of philosophers.

Reimers, Adrian
Good Is Love, The
Good Is Love

The arguments surrounding contraception and “good sex” seem to have set the grounds for coherently choosing a side rather than to have succeeded in presenting certain human acts as definitively immoral. As Reimers notes, a natural law position on contraception often fails to employ its greatest ally: the reality of authentic human love and “victory” of the individual in one’s sanctity as achieved through that love. This work will reorient the objectives and claims of the moral debate, as well as influence the popular notion of what love is and what it cannot be. It is an aid to scholars, students and study groups, humanists, and those who seek to deepen the sense of love’s highest physical expression.

Rhees, Rush
Discussions of Wittgenstein
Discussions of Wittgenstein

Includes review articles of books on Wittgenstein and independent discussions of special points of Wittgenstein’s philosophy, as well as Rhees’s personal reminiscences of his friend and teacher.

Rhodes, James M.
Knowledge, Sophistry, and Scientific Politics
Knowledge, Sophistry, and Scientific Politics

James Rhodes’ Plato is a playwright. And a mystic. In his famous “Seventh Letter” Plato had stated that the essence of his thought couldn’t be put into writing and hence he hadn’t done so. This is the self-interpretation of a mystic, Rhodes concludes. But then, two eminent questions arise: Why, then, did Plato write at all? And, how have his writings—his dialogues—to be understood, that is to be read?

Rice, Charles E.
Winning Side, The
The Winning Side

Pope John Paul II said, “All together we must build a new culture of life.” Is this possible in the United States? Over 40 million Americans have died by legalized abortion, euthanasia is an accepted practice now, and a pagan culture is hostile to morality and the family. 

Rice, Charles E.
Right or Wrong
Right or Wrong

In What Happened to Notre Dame? (St. Augustine’s Press, 2009), Charles E. Rice, Professor Emeritus at Notre Dame Law School, traced that university’s loss of Catholic identity to the Land O’Lakes Declaration of 1967 in which Notre Dame and other “Catholic” universities declared their independence from the Church. 

Rice, Charles E.
What Happened to Notre Dame?
What Happened to Notre Dame?

When the University of Notre Dame announced that President Barack Obama would speak at its 2009 Commencement and would receive an honorary doctor of laws degree, the reaction was more than anyone expected. Students, faculty, alumni, and friends of Notre Dame denounced the honoring of Obama, who is the most relentlessly pro-abortion public official in the world. Beyond abortion, Obama has taken steps to withdraw from health-care professionals the right of conscientious objection. Among them are thousands of Notre Dame alumni who will be forced to choose between continuing their profession and participating in activities they view as immoral, including the execution of the unborn. And they will be forced to that choice by the politician upon whom their alma mater confers its highest honors. (Mary Ann Glendon, distinguished Harvard law professor and former ambassador to the Vatican, felt obliged to turn down the prestigious Laetare Medal because of this.)

Rice, Charles E.
Contraception and Persecution
Contraception and Persecution

“Contraceptive sex,” wrote social science researcher Mary Eberstadt in 2012, “is the fundamental social fact of our time.” In this important and pointed book, Charles E. Rice, of the Notre Dame Law School, makes the novel claim that the acceptance of contraception is a prelude to persecution. He makes the striking point that contraception is not essentially about sex. It is a First Commandment issue: Who is God?

Rice, Charles E. and Farnan, Theresa
Where Did I Come From? Where Am I Going? How Do I Get There?
Where Did I Come From? Where Am I Going? How Do I Get There?

Where Did I Come From? Where Am I Going? How Do I Get There? is a complete course on Catholicism, featuring concise, reader-friendly, relevant prose. Straight answers are tailored for today’s generation. Topics addressed include: Can I know anything? Can I know what God is like? How am I really in the image and likeness of God? What about my conscience? Am I a gift to others? What about my freedom? Is any sexual activity OK before marriage? Do we have to keep Grandma on a feeding tube forever?

Richter, Melvin
Politics of Conscience, The
The Politics of Conscience

Few thinkers exerted a greater influence upon British thought and public policy between 1880 and 1914 than T. H. Green. Chapter headings include: Idealism and the Crisis of Evangelical Conscience; Metaphysical Foundations; the Principles of Political Obligation; From the Old Liberalism to the New; Private Property, Capitalism and State Intervention; the Life of Citizenship.

Rilke, Rainer Maria
Sonnets of Rainer Maria Rilke, The
The Sonnets of Rainer Maria Rilke

Romano Guardini described Rainer Maria Rilke as the “poet who had things of such importance to say about the end of our own age [and] was also a prophet of things to come.” The complexity of Rilke is, then, “highly relevant to modern Man.” Decades after Guardini’s assessment, the reader who rediscovers Rilke will find a depth of mind and soul that display a profundity the post-modern reader only thinks he possesses. 

Roberts, Robert C., Moore, Scott H., and Schmeltekopf, Donald D.
Finding a Common Thread
Finding a Common Thread

In this book, a group of prominent scholar-teachers meditate on how to read, in the context of a specifically Christian university or college education, some of the greatest texts of the Western tradition. Each author devotes himself or herself to a single text. In many cases, the authors have been reading, rereading, marking, ruminating, inwardly digesting, teaching, and discussing their text for several decades, so that they offer here a distillation of years of familiarity and reflection.

Robinson, Philip H.
Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide
Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide

In a society where euthanasia is strongly supported by many, and where supporters make appeals to Christian virtues such as mercy, compassion, and love, it is more important than ever for the Church's real teaching to be known. Is “mercy killing” ever right? This booklet explores the Catholic Church's teaching on why euthanasia is always wrong and explodes popular myths and misconceptions.

Rosen, Stanley
Limits of Analysis, The
The Limits of Analysis

Philosophy in the twentieth century has been dominated by the urge for analysis, a methodology that is supposed to be comparable in clarity and correctness to scientific thought. In this brilliant and devastating attack on such exaggerated claims, Stanley Rosen demonstrates how analysis alone lacks the power to approach the deepest and most important philosophical questions. He thus provides us with a new and deeper understanding of the nature and limits of analytic thinking.

Rosen, Stanley
Ancients and the Moderns, The
The Ancients and the Moderns

In this insightful and controversial book, Rosen takes a new look at the famous "quarrel" that the moderns have with the ancients, analyzing and comparing ancient philosophers and modern Continental and analytical thinkers from Plato, Descartes, and Kant to Fichte, Nietzsche, and Rorty. He urges that we not dismiss the classical heritage but appropriate it, for this appropriation is an indispensable step in the process of legitimizing our historical experience.

Rosen, Stanley
Plato's Sophist
Plato's Sophist

Plato’s great attempt to define the nature of the sophist – the false image of the philosopher – has perplexed readers from classical times to the present. The dialogue has been central in the ongoing debate about the theory of forms, and it remains a crucial text for Plato scholars in both the analytical and the phenomenological traditions.

Rosen, Stanley
Plato's Symposium
Plato's Symposium

This is the first full-length study of the Symposium to be published in English, and one of the first English works on Plato to take its bearings by the dramatic form of the Platonic dialogue, a thesis that was regarded as heterodox at the time but which today is widely accepted by scholars of the most diverse standpoint. Rosen was also one of the first to study in detail the philosophical significance of the phenomenon of concrete human sexuality, as it is presented by Plato in the diverse characters of the main speakers in the dialogue. His analysis of the theoretical significance of pederasty in the dialogue was highly controversial at the time, but is today accepted as central to Plato’s dramatic phenomenology of human existence.

Rosen, Stanley
G. W. F. Hegel
G. W. F. Hegel

“This is a brilliant book and an important contribution to Hegelian studies in English. It attempts to provide a comprehensive summary of the Hegelian system as a whole that is technically accurate and faithful to Hegel’s intention.... A brilliant explication of the character of Hegelian logic . . . required reading for all Hegel scholars.”  – Journal of the American Academy of Religion

Rosen, Stanley
The Question of Being
The Question of Being

In this book, Rosen enters into a debate with Heidegger in order to provide a justification for metaphysics. Rosen presents a fresh interpretation of metaphysics that opposes the traditional doctrines attacked by Heidegger, on the one hand, and by contemporary philosophers influenced by Heidegger, on the other. He refutes Heidegger’s claim that metaphysics (or what Heidegger calls Platonism) is derived from the Aristotelian science of being as being. He argues indeed that metaphysics is simply the commonsensical reflection on the nature of ordinary experience and on the standards of living a better life.

Rosen, Stanley
Platonic Productions
Platonic Productions

Platonic Productions presents Prof. Stanley Rosen’s Etienne Gilson Lectures, delivered at the Institut Catholique de Paris and now available in English for first time. His lectures bring Heidegger and Plato into a conversation around a basic philosophical question: Does the acquisition of truth resemble discovery or production?

 

 

 

Rosen, Stanley
Nihilism
Nihilism

“The growing importance of reason in philosophy concerns Stanley Rosen in this essay. Rosen’s primary objective is to defend Plato and classical philosophy against Martin Heidegger’s radical existentialist criticism. . . . Many critics of Heidegger consider his dubious politics during the early days of Nazi rule irrelevant to the understanding of his work. Rosen argues, on the contrary, that Heidegger’s philosophy helps explain his initial enthusiasm for, and later submission to, the Nazi regime. The argument yields genuine insight into the connection between philosophical and political nihilism. Furthermore, exposing the evil consequences of nihilistic thought adds to his stout defense of the classical tradition.” – Elliot Feingold, Book Week

Rosen, Stanley
Metaphysics in Ordinary Language
Metaphysics in Ordinary Language

Rosen addresses a wide range of topics – from eros, poetry, and freedom to problems like negation and the epistemological status of sense perception. Though diverse in subject, Rosen’s essays share two unifying principles: there can be no legitimate separation of textual hermeneutics from philosophical analysis, and philosophical investigation must be oriented in terms of everyday language and experience, although it cannot simply remain within these confines. Ordinary experience provides a minimal criterion for the assessment of extraordinary discourses, Rosen argues, and without such a criterion we would have no basis for evaluating conflicting discourses: philosophy would give way to poetry.

Rosen, Stanley
Essays in Philosophy: Modern
Essays in Philosophy: Modern

The essays in these two books were selected from Stanley Rosen’s career as a philosopher, scholar, and teacher over the last half of a century. They represent both the vast range of his learning in the most important philosophers of the tradition and the daring and penetration of his exploration of the fundamental philosophical questions. Yet the essays are written with an accessibility that is an expression of Rosen’s thesis that our ordinary experience and speech provides the only stable ground for understanding and evaluating extraordinary thought and experiences.

Rosen, Stanley
Essays in Philosophy: Ancient
Essays in Philosophy: Ancient

The essays in these two books were selected from Stanley Rosen’s career as a philosopher, scholar, and teacher over the last half of a century. They represent both the vast range of his learning in the most important philosophers of the tradition and the daring and penetration of his exploration of the fundamental philosophical questions. Yet the essays are written with an accessibility that is an expression of Rosen’s thesis that our ordinary experience and speech provides the only stable ground for understanding and evaluating extraordinary thought and experiences.

Rosen, Stanley
Plato's Statesman
Plato's Statesman

Rosen presents a rich and provocative analysis of the Statesman, one of Plato’s most challenging works, and contends that the main theme of the dialogue is defining the art of politics and the degree to which political experience is subject to the rule of sound judgment (phronésis) and to technical construction (techné).
 

Rosen, Stanley
Language of Love, The
The Language of Love

Stanley Rosen completed The Language of Love in the early 1970s, but the manuscript was put aside and only rediscovered in 2013, the year before his death. The Language of Love is an interpretation of the Phaedrus that was meant to follow and complete Rosen’s Symposium commentary. Only two articles have been previously published. Rosen’s frequent references to the central passages and second half of the Phaedrus were more important in pointing up the importance of his absent full interpretation of the dialogue.

Ross, Ian S., editor
On the Wealth of Nations
On the Wealth of Nations

The first book to capture the impact Smith’s great work had on his contemporaries, this volume documents the immediate reaction in Britain, the entrance of the Wealth of Nations into politics, and the early reception on the Continent. Features letters written to Smith, early reviews, and extracts from books, and includes a wealth of previously inaccessible criticism and analysis, including contributions from David Hume, William Robertson, Adam Ferguson, Lord Lauderdale, Dugald Stewart, William Pitt, Henry Mackenzie, J. G. Schiller, and others.

Rowold, Katharina, editor
Gender and Science
Gender and Science

Explores how late nineteenth-century science affected the construction and understanding of gender categories. Presenting a range of views on issues raised by the women’s movement, the volume particularly focuses on the question of middleclass women’s education, occupations, and professions.