Author

Murray, Paul, O.P.
Moling in Meditation
Moling in Meditation

These quiet, surprising, amazing poems deliver to the reader fresh contact with wisdom for life––lessons we should have known had we paused a little more and looked, things we may have known and lost track of, insights we perhaps sense and now can finally grasp with these words of Moling––of Paul Murray––sharing with us his thoughts, his prayers, his stories of struggle and grace. These poems are “the hidden lost language of the soul” revealed.

 Jeremy Driscoll, O.S.B. Abbot of Mount Angel Abbey

Nash, Richard
John Craige's Mathematical Principles of Christian Theology
John Craige's Mathematical Principles of Christian Theology

Seventeenth-century mathematician Craige attempted to determine the earliest possible date of the Apocalypse by using the most current mathematical and philosophical reasoning, but, more often than not, he was ridiculed as an eccentric and a crank.

Nemeth, Charles P.
Aquinas on Crime
Aquinas on Crime

Not much escapes the intellect and imagination of the Angelic Doctor, St. Thomas Aquinas. Whether it be love, children, education, moral reasoning, happiness or the proper dispositions for human existence, St. Thomas seems an expert in all of it. Crime and criminal conduct are no exceptions to this general tendency with him. Not only does he have much to say about it, what he relates is perpetually fresh and surely the bedrock of what is now taken for granted. In this short treatise, the focus targets St. Thomas’s criminal codification – his law of crimes.

Newcomb, Mark
Ark, the Covenant, and the Poor Men's Chest, The
The Ark, the Covenant, and the Poor Men's Chest

What role did Humanism play in the emergence of English Protestantism? This question has remained a live issue for Reformation scholarship over the past four centuries. In the Ark, the Covenant, and the Poor Men’s Chest, the author examines the issue in detail, utilizing categories drawn from the research of John W. O’Malley on the application of different modes of classical rhetoric to biblical interpretation during the Renaissance.

 

Niemeyer, Gerhart
Between Nothingness and Paradise
Between Nothingness and Paradise

This highly relevant essay by the prominent political philosopher has as its central theme the feature common to all totalitarian ideologies, “the total critique of society” that social criticism that rejects not this or that injustice but damns the entire “system” and overshadows an entire historical period.

Niemeyer, Gerhart
Loss and Recovery of Truth, The
The Loss and Recovery of Truth

That the United States is currently in the midst of a serious crisis, even an ideological civil war, which is part of the general and prolonged crisis of Western civilization is obvious to any thoughtful observer. One of the most perceptive observers of the development of this crisis was Gerhart Niemeyer. As a fugitive from Nazi Germany, a devout Christian, and a political theorist who had mastered the philosophical tradition and the Communist worldview, he was particularly well equipped to discern the ways in which the various modern ideologies insidiously erode the substance of truth and order in contemporary society and to seek remedies in the return to the ontological and spiritual roots of order in the Western tradition.

Nietzsche, Friedrich
Prefaces to Unwritten Works
Prefaces to Unwritten Works

Prefaces to Unwritten Works is a collection of five essays, prefaces to books that Nietzsche never went on to write. Nietzsche himself put these prefaces together in the form of a small leather-bound, handwritten book, and gave that book to Cosima Wagner as a Christmas present in 1872. The dedicatory letter indicates that Nietzsche sent this little book to Cosima “in heartfelt reverence and as an answer to verbal and epistolary questions.” As such, this work is a window into Nietzsche’s relations with the Wagners at the height of their association, but it is also a continuation of Nietzsche’s radical confrontation with Greek antiquity that had begun with the then-recently published Birth of Tragedy. The Wagners read Nietzsche’s book of prefaces on the evening of New Year’s Day 1873, and Cosima records in her diary five days later that at night, “again” she reflected about the essence of art as a consequence of Nietzsche’s work. A month later, Cosima sent Nietzsche a letter encouraging him to write at least two of the books promised by his prefaces.

Nietzsche, Friedrich
On the Future of Our Educational Institutions
On the Future of Our Educational Institutions

On the Future of Our Educational Institutions, the work that was to have been Nietzsche's second book until he canceled the contract and used portions in his Untimely Meditations, is a substantial call for radical educational reform presented in the form of a prolonged narrative dialogue. It is presented here in the first English translation ever from the standard critical edition (a little-known translation was made for the Complete Works of 1909, long out of print). Here Nietzsche, through the characters of this prolonged narrative dialogue, starts from a consideration of German educational institutions and rises to a consideration of what is needed for true, or classical, education. Though Nietzsche engages his contemporary world more in this work than in perhaps any other, this engagement is neither arbitrary nor limiting. Starting where one is and has grown up happens to be the necessary grounding of the organic unity that belongs to true culture:

Novak, Michael
All Nature Is a Sacramental Fire
All Nature Is a Sacramental Fire

The Lord God Creator has given us five openings to the physical world around us, that sacramental world in which we swim: hearing, sight, taste, touch, and smell. The experience of each of these senses is sometimes sharp and clean; poignant, evocative, almost unendurable. In the lines of this collection, penned during sixty years, Michael Novak has sought to snatch from the flames of rushing time a few simple pieces, shards, remainders. “All Nature is a Heraclitean Fire,” a real poet wrote. Novak calls himself an amateur. But one who believes, however, that everybody should write poetry, or reach for it. It is the language of our soul. It is concentrated prose.

Nuovo, Victor
John Locke and Christianity
John Locke and Christianity

Locke’s The Reasonableness of Christianity, published anonymously in 1695, entered a world upset by fierce theological conflict and immediately became a subject of controversy. At issue were the author’s intentions. John Edwards labeled it a Socinian work and charged that it was subversive not only of Christianity but of religion itself; others praised it as a sure preservative of both. Few understood Locke’s intentions.

O'Callaghan, John, editor
Science, Philosophy, and Theology

A comprehensive series of papers on the intersection between science, on the on hand, and philosophy and theology, on the other. Contributors include Benedict M. Ashley, O.P, Daniel McInerny, William E. Carroll, Michael Letteney, Peter Hodgson, John O’Callaghan, Angelo Campodonico, Marion Enrique Sacchi, Marie George, Michael Tkacz, Anthony J. Lisska, William Hoye, Mariano Artigas, and others.

O'Connell, Marvin R.
Telling Stories that Matter
Telling Stories that Matter

The late historian Marvin O’Connell left a legacy of brilliant prose and pictures of the past, and in this book the reader at long last has access to O’Connell’s own story. Fr. Bill Miscamble, a noted historian and scholar in his own right, attributes to O’Connell the title ‘Master’ above all on account of his ability to know what matters and then write about it “in the way that all great stories are told.”

O'Connor, Bernard J.
Papal Diplomacy
Papal Diplomacy

Pope John Paul II is not only the spiritual leader of the Roman Catholic Church, but is Head of State for the Vatican. As such, he is among the most experienced diplomats on the international scene today, having given, during the 25-year span of his pontificate, over 2,000 speeches to representatives of the UN, to 172 ambassadors accredited to the Holy See, to non-governmental entities and to inter-governmental organizations.

O'Connor, Bernard J.
Witness through Encounter
Witness Through Encounter

 Witness Through Encounter intends to fulfill multiple needs. The diplomatic approach exemplified herein is singular and worthy of study among political scientists, sociologists, philosophers and diplomats eager to embrace a worldview that is more personal than simply humanistic. This work will also be useful in inter-religious settings. An additional advantage of O’Connor’s presentation of Benedict XVI’s diplomatic approach, his witness through encounter, is that it contains insight valuable to the scholar alongside the resources used.

O'Connor, David K.
Plato's Bedroom
Plato's Bedroom

Plato’s Bedroom is a book for people who want to be better at falling in love and being in love, with all the ecstasies and dangers erotic life can bring. It is also an inviting book for readers who are intellectually playful and up for a challenge, written with verve, and full of stories thoughtful persons will find to be mirrors of their own erotic selves. Drawing on Greek myth, Plato, Shakespeare, and a wide range of modern literature and movies, the book gets Aphrodite talking with the young lovers in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and lets us listen in on Woody Allen arguing with Othello. The author’s account of how we seek, fear, avoid, and sometimes destroy love, is astonishingly fresh and engaging.

O'Hear, Anthony
Cambridge Philosophers

A series of nine major articles by eminent philosophers on the life and work of some of the most important twentiethcentury philosophers at Cambridge. All these essays originally appeared in the journal Philosophy from the Royal Institute of Philosophy.

Contributors include:

Henry Sidgwick by Ross Harrison

A. N. Whitehead by Dorothy Emmet

J. M. E. McTaggart by Peter Geach

Bertrand Russell by Ray Monk

G. E. Moore by Thomas Baldwin

C. D. Broad by Theo Redpath

Ludwig Wittgenstein by G. E. M. Anscombe

F. P. Ramsey by D. H. Mellor

John Wisdom by Ilham Dilman

O'Neil, Catherine
Juliusz Slowacki's Agamemnon's Tomb
Juliusz Slowacki's Agamemnon's Tomb

The importance of Juliusz Slowacki (1809–1849) as Poland’s second greatest Romantic poet, after Adam Mickiewicz (1798–1856), is a platitude. Yet, in the English-speaking world, Slowacki receives little more than honorable mention even among students of Slavic literature. The intention of the authors of Agamemnon’s Tomb: A Polish Oresteia is to focus on Slowacki’s use of Antiquity in his most famous lyric, Agamemnon’s Tomb, written in 1839.

of the Martyrs, Bartholomew
Stimulus Pastorum
Stimulus Pastorum

 The work of St. Bartholomew of Braga, O.P. (1514–1590) appears here in English for the first time despite its long and enduring influence in ecclesiastical circles. His meditations on the office of pastor have provided critical insight bishops since their initial circulation and have helped form the most famous among them, including Bartholomew's proteges Charles Borromeo. Pope Paul VI ordered a copy of Bartholomew's work to be distributed among the Catholic bishops at the Second Vatican Council. Donald Prudlo's translation situates St. Bartholomew of the Martyrs in his historical context as a lynchpin of Catholic Reform and affirms him as a figurehead of pastoral administration even in our own times.

Owens, Joseph, C.Ss.R.
Aristotle's Gradations of Being in <em> Metaphysics </em> E-Z
Aristotle's Gradations of Being in Metaphysics E-Z

Gradations of Being was edited from the papers of Joseph Owens. Some fifty years after his groundbreaking book The Doctrine of Being in the Aristotelian Metaphysics, Owens turned again to consider the central themes in Aristotle’s conception of a science of being or “first philosophy.” Reflecting on a half-century of scholarship, and drawing on his own extensive publications in Greek and medieval philosophy, Owens sets forth in a step-by-step meticulous argument his own interpretation of Aristotle’s account of substance, essence, and the gradations of being. Owens writes extensively of the different but complimentary approaches of Aristotle and Thomas Aquinas. He discusses the many facets of the Aristotelian notion of “form,” including its role in a realistic epistemology.

P. H. Nidditch
Development of Mathematical Logic, The
The Development of Mathematical Logic

A clear, straightforward summary of the history of formal logic from Aristotle to Gödel. Nidditch discusses the four main trends at the root of modern logic: Aristotle’s theory of the syllogism; the idea of a universal language; the idea of the parts of mathematics forming deductive systems; and the discoveries in mathematics in the early nineteenth century. He outlines the chief ideas and theories on mathematical logic, including Jevons, Peirce, Boole, Russell, and Whitehead. The text is easy to read and gives the beginning student a valuable perspective on mathematical logic.

Paddags, Rene M., El-Rayes, Waseem; and McBrayer, Gregory A. (editors)
Pilgrimage of Philosophy, The
The Pilgrimage of Philosophy

The Pilgrimage of Philosophy: A Festschrift for Charles E. Butterworth intends to introduce readers to the work of Charles E. Butterworth, and thereby to introduce students to Medieval Islamic political philosophy, of which Butterworth is one of the world’s most prominent scholars. In a wider sense, the Festschrift introduces its readers to the current debates on Medieval Islamic political philosophy, related as they are to the questions of the relationship between Islam and Christianity, the Medieval to the Modern world, and reason and revelation

Pagna, Tom
Petals from a Rose
Petals from a Rose

Tom Pagna, former football star at Miami of Ohio and coach at Notre Dame, traces the narrative of his family around the central character of his mother Rose, and in so doing shows us a way to live that is more than a way to survive In it, Pagna tells the wonderful sotries of his family’s past.

Pagna, Tom
Phantom Letters, The
The Phantom Letters

In the Era of Ara from 1964 through the 1974 season, a written chronicle of pre-game information, slogans, mottoes, and ideals emerged. The author was known only as the Phantom. The letters were one or two pages, written in staccato phrases, geared to thoughts that encompassed team goals and the philosophy to win.

Pagna, Tom with Best, Bob
Notre Dame's Era of Ara
Notre Dame's Era of Ara

Ara Parseghian’s appearance in 1964 to head the Notre Dame football squad put an end to the previous decade of mediocre seasons and returned Notre Dame to the status of a national contender in collegiate football. Over the next eleven years he led the team to an overall record of 95-17-4, coached numerous All-Americans, such as John Huarte, Terry Hanratty, Joe Theismann, Tom Clements, Alan Page, Ross Browner, and Willie Fry, and steered himself, his staff, and his players through the unpredictable social changes of the late ’60s and early ’70s.

Parker, Francis H.
Story of Western Philosophy, The
The Story of Western Philosophy

This book was born of the paperback boom, and it is meant as an aid in the interpretation of the history of Western philosophy. It is designed especially for use in a course in the history of philosophy, but I hope that it may also prove useful for other purposes, such as an historical introduction to philosophy or a comprehensive review of the history of philosophy or just as a help to the general reader trying to make some sense out of the history of Western philosophy. Opening of the Preface

Parrish, Stephen
Knower and the Known, The
The Knower and the Known

The Knower and the Known deals with some of the most controversial subjects in philosophy today: the relation of the mind and the body, the fundamental nature of the physical world, the existence of abstract entities, and the nature of knowledge and its relationship to human consciousness. In doing so, it draws on insights from both contemporary analytic philosophy of mind and phenomenology.

Patrick, James
Making of the Christian Mind, The: The Adventure of the Paraclete
The Making of the Christian Mind: The Adventure of the Paraclete

This work is divided into three volumes, of which the present work is the first. Highlights of this first volume, The Waiting World, include following revelation as it first moved uncertain hearts to write and then to offer explicit witness. In this first installment, Patrick sets the groundwork for following the faith and history of Israel to Justin Martyr’s great claim that what is true belongs to Christians.

Patrick, James
Making of the Christian Mind: The Adventure of the Paraclete, The
The Making of the Christian Mind: The Adventure of the Paraclete: Volume Two

Fire and Witness is the second volume in James Patrick’s saga recounting the current of inspiration guiding, and at times sweeping, the christian heart toward full integration of the mind in the experience of revelation. In the first volume, A Waiting World, Patrick like a true storyteller captures the wonder and anxiety that finally perceives design and canon.

Patrick, James
Making of the Christian Mind, The: The Adventure of the Paraclete
Making of the Christian Mind, The: The Adventure of the Paraclete

In the third installment of The Making of the Christian Mind, James Patrick's Church history and 'adventure' series, we meet more towering figures of Christianity, among them Augustine and Benedict. The former, who abandoned rhetoric to become learned by Saint Ambrose, and the latter, whose Rule built a thousand monastic communities across Europe, were not isolated characters but beneficiaries of wisdom drawn entirely from the pursuit of holiness. What emerges is a culture of living and learning that flourishes on the foundations of prayer. This is the adventure of the Great Helper, who working throughout the passage of time post-Christ has come to guide not just the dreams and spirit of man, but his work and daily life.

Pearce, Joseph
Death Comes for the War Poets
Death Comes for the War Poets

On the centenary of the United States’ entry into World War One, Death Comes for the War Poets grapples with the full horror of trench warfare as experienced by the two greatest war poets, Siegfried Sassoon and Wilfred Owen. It does so through the eyes of the poets themselves but also through the eyes of the Spirit of Death. How does a human soul cope with the horror of war? Is there room for hope? And what of the Spirit of Death, ever present in times of war and peace? Can Death itself be changed? These questions are at the suffering heart of this powerful verse drama.

Pearce, Joseph, editor
Beauteous Truth
Beauteous Truth

Beauteous Truth explores the inextricable connection between the Good, the True and the Beautiful. It is a book that makes the necessary connections between faith and reason and between theology, philosophy, history and literature. It presents a panoramic overview of Western Civilization, from Homer to Tolkien, and highlights the importance of the great figures of the Catholic cultural revival, including Newman, Wilde, Chesterton, Belloc, and C.S. Lewis. Ranging from Shakespeare to Solzhenitsyn, Beauteous Truth celebrates the marriage of sanity and sanctity, which is the fruit of the indissoluble union of fides et ratio.

Pears, David
Motivated Irrationality
Motivated Irrationality

“To explain irrational belief formation and irrational action . . . we may invoke the notions of self-deception and weakness of will. . . . When described in a certain way, these phenomena appear so par-adoxical that doubts have been raised as to their very possibility. David Pear’s Motivated Irrationality is a major step towards this goal. . . .

Peddicord, Richard, O.P.
Sacred Monster of Thomism, The
The Sacred Monster of Thomism

The Sacred Monster of Thomism (the epithet comes from François Mauriac) is the first full-length study of the life and thought of the most influential Dominican theologian in the first half of the twentieth century, and the scourge of liberal theologians everywhere.

Pettus, Peter, Photographs by:
March in Memory, The
The March in Memory

These photographs were taken during the 1965 Civil Rights March from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. Never before published, this is the work of an artist photographer who wanted to tell the story directly and simply, not as a photojournalist, but as a participant in this national and political demonstration. The camera looks deep into the faces of those who were there — black, white, old, young, Northern, and Southern — at the time when America approached one of its greatest times of crisis.

Picard, Max
Flight from God, The
The Flight from God

Max Picard (1888–1965) was a Swiss-German writer, who converted to Catholicism from Judaism. A doctor and psychologist, Picard worked in Berlin but retired in the 1920s to Switzerland. He is often regarded as a “wisdom thinker,” and his rich and penetrating writings continue to speak to us in the twenty-first century. The Flight from God is an incisive, profound description of many of the problems facing modern culture, and its analysis resonates with us more today than when first published in 1934. Picard illustrates that modern culture is essentially in Flight, and so the individual is under pressure to make a choice; in earlier generations only an individual could be in flight because the culture itself was not in flight but in Faith.

Pieper, Josef
In Tune with the World
In Tune with the World

In this stimulating and still-timely study, Josef Pieper takes up a theme of paramount importance to his thinking – that festivals belong by rights among the great topics of philosophical discussion. As he develops his theory of festivity, the modern age comes under close and painful scrutiny. It is obvious that we no longer know what festivity is, namely, the celebration of existence under various symbols.

Pieper, Josef
Enthusiasm and Divine Madness
Enthusiasm and Divine Madness

The main thesis – that in poetry and in love man is “beside himself,” i.e., divinely inspired – is discussed with reference to modern poets, novelists, and modern psychology.

Pieper, Josef
Scholasticism
Scholasticism

In this amazing tour de monde medievale, Josef Pieper moves easily back and forth between the figures and the doctrines that made medieval philosophy unique in Western thought. After reflecting on the invidious implications of the phrase “Middle Ages,” he turns to the fascinating personality of Boethius whose Consolation of Philosophy is second only to the Bible in the number of manuscript copies. Neo-Platonic figures Dionysius and Eriugena are the occasion for a discussion of negative theology. The treatment of Anselm of Canterbury’s proof of God’s existence involves later voices, e.g., Kant. Pieper is enamored of the twelfth century, which is regularly eclipsed by accounts of the thirteenth. He does justice to both, and he gives a thorough and lively account of the struggle between Aristotelians and anti-Aristotelians, and the famous condemnations that put the effort of Saint Thomas Aquinas at risk.

Pieper, Josef
Death and Immortality
Death and Immortality

“Pieper [attempts to] show how death must be seen as an experience of the whole man and is properly to be understood as ‘punishment.’ When he views man’s pilgrim status on earth, Pieper is led to assert that death is an act of human freedom, consistent with Creation and redemption. . . . With his rare gift of high-level popularization, Pieper brings a critical mind and an in-depth acquaintance with the scholastic tradition to bear on contemporary thought and experience. . . .

Pieper, Josef
Concept of Sin, The
The Concept of Sin

In ordinary conversation, including among the “educated,” the word “sin” rarely gets mentioned except when one is trying to be coy or facetious. As Thomas Mann once said, “sin” is nowadays “an amusing word used only when one is trying to get a laugh.”.

Pieper, Josef
Tradition
Tradition

Josef Pieper’s Tradition: Concept and Claim analyzes tradition as an idea and as a living reality in the lives and languages of ordinary people. In the modern world of constant, unrelenting change, tradition, says Pieper, is that which must be preserved unchanged. Drawing on thinkers from Plato to Pascal, Pieper describes the key elements and figures in the act of tradition and what is distinctive about it.

Pieper, Josef
Silence of Goethe, The
The Silence of Goethe

During the last months of the war, Josef Pieper saw the realization of a long-cherished plan to escape from the “lethal chaos” that was the Germany of that time, “plucked,” he writes, “as was Habakkuk, by the hair of his head . . . to be planted into a realm of the most peaceful seclusion, whose borders and exists were, of course, controlled by armed sentries.” There he made contact with a friend close-by, who possessed an amazing library, and Pieper hit upon the idea of reading the letters of Goethe from that library. Soon, however, he decided to read the entire Weimar edition of fifty volumes, which were brought to him in sequence, two or three at a time.

Pieper, Josef
Christian Idea of Man, The
The Christian Idea of Man

In The Christian Idea of Man Josef Pieper brings off an extraordinary feat. He acknowledges that whoever introduces the theme of “virtue” and “the virtues” can expect to be met with a smile – of various shades of condescension. He then proceeds to single out “prudence” as the fundamental virtue on which the other cardinal virtues are based. In defining it, he does away with the shallow connotations which have debased it in modern times. Similarly, he manages to divest it of all traces of “moralism,” which, to a large extent has become identified with the Christian idea of virtue and has made it fall into general disrepute.

Pieper, Josef
Platonic Myths, The
The Platonic Myths

Josef Pieper’s The Platonic Myths is the work of a scholar and philosopher whose search for the level of truth contained in the myths is carried out with a series of careful distinctions between the kinds of myths told by Plato. In the Platonic stories Plato crystallizes mythical fragments from the mere stories which contain them, and in the genuine Platonic myths he purifies the proper mythical elements, freeing them of the non-mythical elements which tend to obscure them.

Pieper, Josef
Silence of St. Thomas, The
The Silence of St. Thomas

A single theme runs through the three essays on St. Thomas gather in this book. It is the theme of mystery or, more exactly, the response of the searching human intellect to the fact of mystery. Both the fact and the response are suggested in a short biography of St. Thomas that forms the first essay and are then sketched out in detail by a presentation of the “negative element” in his philosophy. The third essay shows that contemporary Existentialism is in basic agreement with the philosophia perennis on this fundamental element of philosophical thinking.

Pieper, Josef
Happiness and Contemplation
Happiness and Contemplation

“The ultimate of human happiness is to be found in contemplation.” In offering this proposition of Thomas Aquinas to our thought, Josef Pieper uses traditional wisdom in order to throw light on present-day reality and present-day psychological problems. What, in fact, does one pursue in pursuing happiness? What, in the consensus of the wisdom of the early Greeks, of Plato and Aristotle, of the New Testament, of Augustine and Aquinas, is that condition of perfect bliss toward which all life and effort tend by nature? In this profound and illuminating inquiry, Pieper considers the nature of contemplation, and the meaning and goal of life.

 

Pieper, Josef
Traditional Truth, Poetry, Sacrament
Traditional Truth, Poetry, Sacrament

Pieper collects his contributions to radio programs and to a number of journals and periodicals. The book also includes a selection of notes and comments. The contributions fall into two main groups: the period which encompasses the immediate pre-war period as well as the war period itself, and the post-war period up to 1953.The reader becomes witness, first, to Pieper’s problems with the National Socialist regime and, second, to his problems with the ensuing challenges to religious life as it is exposed to increasing secularization.

Pieper, Josef
Exercises in the Elements
Exercises in the Elements

This title, which at first sight seems curious, shows Pieper’s philosophical work as rooted in the basics. He takes his inspiration from Plato – and his Socrates – and Thomas Aquinas. With them, he is interested in philosophy as pure theory, the theoretical being precisely the non-practical. The philosophizer wants to know what all existence is fundamentally about, what “reality” “really” means. With Plato, Pieper eschews the use of language to convince an audience of anything which is not the truth. If Plato was opposed to the sophists – among them the politicians – Pieper is likewise opposed to discourse that leads to the “use” of philosophy to bolster a totalitarian regime or any political or economic system.

 

Pieper, Josef
Journey to Point Omega, A
A Journey to Point Omega

This volume, the original version of which was published in 1988, brings to a close the autobiographical writings of a modern Christian philosopher who lived through the two World Wars and the ecclesiastical upheaval in the Catholic Church in the context of the Second Vatican Council. What stamps this philosopher throughout the course of his life – with all its social and political uncertainties – is his constant dedication to truth and his manifest unswerving integrity.

Pieper, Josef
Tradition as Challenge
Tradition as Challenge

For Pieper, the study of tradition is anything but antiquarian. He begins with a consideration of tradition in a changing world and is well aware of the need to confront the all-too-common perception that “tradition” is nowadays irrelevant. On the basis of his profound knowledge of the Western philosophical tradition from Plato and Aristotle through Augustine, Boethius, Thomas Aquinas, and Descartes, to modern Existentialism and Marxism, Pieper is able to highlight the values established – and challenged – down through the centuries...