Author

Marcel, Gabriel
Mystery of Being Vol. II: Faith and Reality
Mystery of Being Vol. II: Faith and Reality

The Mystery of Being contains the most systematic exposition of the philosophical thought of Gabriel Marcel, a convert to Catholicism and the most distinguished twentieth-century exponent of Christian existentialism. Its two volumes are the Gifford lectures which Marcel delivered in Aberdeen, Scotland, in 1949 and 1950. Marcel’s work fundamentally challenges most of the major positions of the atheistic existentialists (Sartre, Beauvoir, Camus), especially their belief in an absurd, meaningless, godless universe. These volumes deal with almost all of the major themes of Marcel’s thought: the nature of philosophy, our broken world, man’s deep ontological need for being, our incarnate bodily existence, primary and secondary reflection, participation, being in situation, the identity of the human self, intersubjectivity, mystery and problem, faith, hope, and the reality of God, and immortality.

Marcel, Gabriel
Man against Mass Society
Man against Mass Society

The central theme of this important book is that we are paying the price of an arrogance that refuses to recognize mystery. The author invites the reader to enter into the argument that he holds with himself on a great number of problems. Written in the early 1950s, Marcel’s discussion of these topics are remarkably contemporary.

Marcel, Gabriel
Invisible Threshold, The
The Invisible Threshold

These new plays of Marcel’s, here translated into English for the first time, will appeal to all who are interested in the role of grace in everyday life, in the influence of culture on belief, the relationship between faith and reason, the choice of faith in a secular world, and the struggle between inauthentic and authentic existence. Marcel raises profound questions about these and related topics, but does not offer final answers. In his plays, he leaves that to us.

Marcel, Gabriel
Toward Another Kingdom
Toward Another Kingdom

Maria Traub's translation of Gabriel Marcel's post-war plays is a window into the French philosopher's answer to his own signature questions regarding human existence. And as in the earlier collection of plays, The Invisible Threshold, the realism, passion and sincerity that frame conscience and moral duty in Marcel are most profoundly visible in the day-to-day of family life. Ideas never before presented theatrically emerge in Marcel's characters who struggle to understand their times and how best to live in them. Post-war life was as much a spiritual reckoning as it was a new society, and Marcel's treatment of introspection is a valuable key to his own work.

Marcel's dramas require characters to respond authentically and from their true selves. He thereby offers the vision of how individual compromises may build up to break the world and condemn, or, conversely, contribute to the discovery and meaning of relation and redemption. Traub's new translation will interest the player as much as the scholar, and Marcel's aptitude for theatrical writing is proven once again. His intellectual sensitivity creates characters that beckon performance, which is an added dimension to the presentation of the human condition.

Marion, Jean-Luc
Descartes's Grey Ontology
Descartes's Grey Ontology

The reader who approaches Descartes's first work “Cartesianly,” that is, epistemologically, is faced with an insurmountable difficulty: the Regulae ad Directionem Ingenii is virtually incomprehensible in Cartesian terms. Indeed, Descartes himself appears to have disowned the work, after having put it aside, never to be completed. In this groundbreaking study, first published in 1975 to accompany an Index to the Regulae published in 1976 and a new French translation published in 1977, Jean-Luc Marion argues that the key to understanding the text – and the genesis of Cartesianism – is to read it as a dialogue with Aristotle. Descartes's Rules for the Direction of the Mind becomes intelligible when the precise correspondence between its themes and various Aristotelian texts concerning science and being is established.

Maritain, Jacques
Natural Law
Natural Law

Can there be universal moral principles in a culturally and religiously diverse world? Are such principles provided by a theory of natural law? Jacques response to both questions is “yes.”

Maritain, Raïssa
We Have Been Friends Together and Adventures in Grace
We Have Been Friends Together and Adventures in Grace

Raïssa Maritain (1883–1960), best known as the wife of the famous French philosopher Jacques Maritain, was a remarkable person in her own right. A poet, philosopher, translator, and mystic, she was at the epicenter of French intellectual life in the first half of the twentieth century. Her autobiography, We Have Been Friends Together, together with the second part, Adventures in Grace, were originally published in two volumes in 1941 and 1944. Both books are combined here and are now being re-issued for the first time.

Marlin, George J.
Squandered Opportunities
Squandered Opportunities

“When statesmen forsake their own private conscience for the sake of their public duties, they lead their country by a short route to chaos.” – Thomas More, patron saint of politicians

Marlin, George J.
Narcissist Nation
Narcissist Nation

It’s not easy being Catholic and conservative in secular ‘Blue State’ New York, but that’s what George J. Marlin is, always has been, and always will be. Don’t ask him to change.

Marlin, George J.
Fighting the Good Fight
Fighting the Good Fight

The story of New York's feisty Conservative Party is really the saga of America's tumultuous political maturity. Born in response to the rise of Nelson Rockefeller's liberal Republicanism, the New York's Conservative Party has grown to become the nation's most successful third party. It has also turned out to be its political conscience.

 

Marlin, George J.
Christian Persecutions in the Middle East
Christian Persecutions in the Middle East

In his new book, author and political commentator George J. Marlin, chairman of Aid to the Church in Need-USA – an agency under the guidance of the Pope that supports the persecuted and suffering Church around the world – describes the sharp rise in Christian persecution in the Middle East. After brief narratives on the rise of Christianity, Islam, and terrorism in the Middle East, Marlin documents country by country, acts of twenty-first century Christian persecution that is nearing a bloody climax that could produce the unthinkable: a Middle East without Christians and the destruction of an ancient patrimony that has been a vital link to the very birth of Christianity.

Marlin, George J.
American Catholic Voter, The
The American Catholic Voter

From the earliest days in the New World through the disputed presidential election of 2000, the influence of Catholics on American politics has followed a peculiar arc. In Colonial America, Catholics were often denied participation in the process; but in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the Catholic bloc was recognized as a swing vote that determined the outcome of numerous elections; and today Catholics are either so assimilated or disunited that as a group their impact is declining.

Marlin, George J.
Mario Cuomo
Mario Cuomo

Among all the fifty-six men who have served as New York’s governor, none was more complicated, self-righteous, pugilistic, and exasperating than Mario Cuomo.

As governor, Mario Cuomo is remembered most for his advocacy of the “personally-opposed-but” position on abortion that led to confrontations with Catholic Church hierarchy, and for dithering about his presidential ambitions, that led the media to dub him the “Hamlet on the Hudson.” His political style reminded many of Machiavelli; Cuomo styled himself a successor to St. Thomas More.

In this political profile, George J. Marlin sets the record straight on Mario Cuomo.

 

Maslow, Alexander
Study of Wittgenstein's 'Tractatus', A
A Study of Wittgenstein's 'Tractatus'

Influenced by the logical positivism of Moritz , and by Russell and Ramsey, Maslow’s interpretation is that Wittgenstein’s basic philosophy is a kind of Kantian phenomenology. In this, the first critical study of the Tractatus by an American philosopher, Maslow examines Wittgenstein’s solipsism and mysticism, neglected areas of his philosophy. “One of the earliest, most neglected, and most thorough works covering several important aspects of the Tractatus.” – Plochmann and Lawson,Terms in their Propositional Contexts in Wittgenstein’s Tractatus

Maspero, Giulio
Mystery of Communion, The
The Mystery of Communion

The brevity of this work limits the amount of citations and textual references given, and Maspero instead urges the reader to study the book alongside Scripture. His manner of writing respects the impossibility of speaking of God in his immanence, but he nonetheless carves out a place for the Trinity in the human intellect, a place where the Jewish and Christian God might be encountered.

Maspero, Giulio
After Pandemic, After Modernity
After Pandemic, After Modernity

 The global pandemic has levied a heavy toll on humanity, but in its wake appears a great opportunity. Amidst what he calls a crisis of modernity, Giulio Maspero points to a phenomenon that can be seen in plain sight. "The absence of personal relationships highlighted by the health crisis exposes the consequences of the modern matrix, which, having lost its Christian element, now risks transforming itself into a digital matrix, substantially configuring itself as a technognosis."  

Mastroeni, Anthony J., S.T.D., J.D., editor
Is a Culture of Life Still Possible in the U.S.?
Is a Culture of Life Still Possible in the U.S.?

Subjects from public philosophy and natural law to spiritual healing and alienation, and building a culture of life, from contributors Deal Hudson, Robert P. George, Rev. Stephen F. Brett, SSJ, Gerald L. Campbell, Patrick Fagan, John Haas, Bernard Dobranski, and others.

May, William E. and Whitehead, Kenneth D.
Battle for the Catholic Mind, The
The Battle for the Catholic Mind

A Selection of outstanding articles from the Fellowship’s first thirteen years of Proceedings.

Contributors include Germain Grisez, Msgr. George A. Kelly, Paul C. Vitz, Joseph M. Boyle, Rev. Ronald Lawler, OFM CAP., John M. Finnis, James Hitchcock, Maura A. Daly, R. V. Young, John M. Haas, Robert P. George, Joyce A. Little, Benedict M. Ashley, O.P., Alice Ramos, Rev. Marvin R. O’Connell, Janet E. Smith, Gerard V. Bradley, and Rev. Robert Sokolowski.

McCarthy, Anthony
Cloning and Stem Cell Research
Cloning and Stem Cell Research

Catholic teaching regarding human cloning is closely linked to the sanctity of life, the status of the embryo, and the meaning of sex and marriage. It addresses the tensions between the relief of suffering-which can be sought in good or bad ways-and respect for every human being. Anthony McCarthy sets out the scientific background to cloning, explains the Church's teaching, and examines secular arguments for and against human cloning.

McGuinness, Brian, editor
Wittgenstein and His Times
Wittgenstein and His Times

Anthony Kenny attempts to reconcile Wittgenstein’s apparently contradictory images of the nature of philosophy; McGuinness explores the similarities of method between philosophy as Wittgenstein practices it and psychoanalysis; J. C. Nyíri examines the influence on Wittgenstein of Spengler and the conservative fascination with mythology, symbolism, gesture, and ritual in Frazer’s Golden Bough, G. H. von Wright sums up Wittgenstein’s relation to his times and stresses his alienation from contemporary attitudes.

McInerny, D. Q.
Being Ethical
Being Ethical

Being Ethical is fundamentally intended to serve as a sequel to D. Q. McInerny’s Being Logical (Random House, 2004), which has remained in print and has been translated into six languages. Its style lends itself to being used as a textbook in liberal studies. More generally, it is a refreshing presentation of this topic and timely and timeless exhortation to readers of the necessity of a love of virtue for ethical thought. For friends and students of Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas and Ralph McInerny, this book bears a style and manner that is both familiar and much loved.

McInerny, Ralph
Let's Read Latin
Let's Read Latin

At last, a user-friendly introduction to Church Latin using church and scriptural documents themselves, allowing the student to build up knowledge with meaningful texts. All paradigms, grammar, and vocabulary are included, and the texts are explained line by line. A 60-minute audio CD is included to aid in pronunciation. Let’s Read Latin is for students of all ages, and a boon to home-schoolers too.

McInerny, Ralph
Soul of Wit, The
The Soul of Wit

Poems written in what, in the debased coin of chronology, can be called the golden years are not like those written in youth. In earlier volumes, Ralph McInerny has proved that Belloc has no equal in light verse (An Abecedary) and that the Bard cannot be approximated (Shakespearian Variations). In his latest collection, The Soul of Wit, he tries his hand at a variety of forms, preferring the formal comfort of more demanding prosody.

McInerny, Ralph
Shakespearean Variations
Shakespearean Variations

In Shakespearean Variations, Ralph McInerny takes the first lines of the sonnets and their end rhymes, and composes sonnets of his own. The formal structure of the sonnet has always provided a salutary discipline for the poet – iambic pentameter, the delicate symmetry of octet and sextet, the closing couplet which epitomizes the poem. The stamp that Shakespeare put upon the form, the themes of love and death, age and youth, loyalty and betrayal, have come to seem to adhere to the very form.

McInerny, Ralph
Good Knights
Good Knights

These stories represent an intermediate stage in the evolution of the Knight brothers in Ralph McInerny’s fiction. In The Noonday Devil, Phil, in his capacity as private detective, was fairly close to the action, but by no means the major character. Roger, his blimpsized brother, entered obliquely into the story but ended by starring in the finale.

McInerny, Ralph
Some Catholic Writers
Some Catholic Writers

In a series of swift aperçus, Ralph McInerny puts before the reader a number of writers who in their different ways were influenced by their Catholic faith – or in the case of Willa Cather by a faith that was a near cousin to Catholicism. Many of these writers would have been surprised by, even unhappy with, the designation Catholic. The adjective may suggest that their fiction is apologetic, catechetical, pastoral. But the point of noticing the influence of faith on the outlook of these writers is not to separate them off from writers tout court, but to emphasize that they occupy in a way noteworthy in these last times the mainstream of Western literature. It would seem gratuitous to refer to Dante and Shakespeare and Dryden as Catholic authors. There is no need to point out that the faith was the very air they breathed. Nowadays it seems useful to make the point explicit.

McInerny, Ralph
Defamation of Pius XII, The
The Defamation of Pius XII

Eugenio Pacelli, Pius XII, was one of the few unalloyed heroes of World War II. At great personal risk, he saved some 800,000 Jews from extermination by the Nazis. Jewish refugees were given asylum in the Vatican, swelling the number of Swiss Guards. No Allied leader can match his glorious record. Golda Meir lauded Pius XII after the war, and the chief rabbi of Rome became a Roman Catholic, taking the name of Eugenio in tribute to Eugenio Pacelli.

McTaggart, J. McT. E.
Some Dogmas of Religion
Some Dogmas of Religion

For most of the twentieth century, discussions of McTaggart has revolved around his notorious denial of the reality of time. Some Dogmas of Religion is a popular exposition of his philosophy that provides an accessible route into the central elements of his fuller metaphysical system without becoming embroiled with this still contentious issue. First published in 1906, this, the second edition, appeared in 1930 and includes an introduction by C. D. Broad.

McTaggart, J. McT. E.
Philosophical Studies
Philosophical Studies

This work contains the essence of McTaggart’s idealistic philosophy. In his lucid and well-argued style, he tackles the fundamental aspects of metaphysical inquiry: the existence of God, belief and mysticism, time, eternity, causality, self, immortality, the nature of good, individual purpose, and value.

Mendenhall, Allen
Shouting Softly
Shouting Softly

The work is given in three parts. The first section on law explores legal minds, rules and commentary on seminal jurisprudence. The second part explores literature and the influence of the writer and the disconcerting truths stories often seek to convey. Thirdly, Mendenhall delves into culture and the more obvious situations wherein we gain insight into our manner of living, and here Mendenhall exudes a Southern accent that in no way compromises his universal bearings.

Mendoza, Cristian and Clavell, Lluís
Communication Culture in a Digital Age
Communication Culture in a Digital Age

Why are human beings so attracted to information and communication technologies? Developments in this field have formed new social networks around these technologies and that seem to compete with pre-existing structures in human lives. Cristian Mendoza and Lluís Clavell confront this phenomenon and its effect on human happiness, but have no desire to condemn the trajectory of human reliance on communication technology. Rather, they see an opportunity to explore human nature at greater depths. Only in this way can our use of technology properly support human activity and not sabotage our grasp of reality.

Menn, Stephen
Plato on God as Nous
Plato on God as Nous

The first sustained modern investigation of Plato’s theology, which focuses on the Timaeus as Plato’s most complete effort to provide what (according to the Phaedo) Anaxagoras had failed to deliver: an explanation of the world through Reason.

Mill, John Stuart
John Stuart Mill
John Stuart Mill

In addition to “On Liberty” and “On Representative Government,” this new selection of Mill’s writings includes, among others, a number of less known of his writings, such as: “Civilization,” “Perfectibility,” “The Negro Question,” “On Education,” “On Aristocracy,” “On Marriage,” “On Free Press,” “Socialism,” Mill’s review of Tocqueville’s “Democracy in America,” his letters to Tocqueville, and several other writings.

Mintz, Samuel
Hunting of Leviathan, The
The Hunting of Leviathan

Mintz examines the contemporary reaction in England to the “Monster of Malmesbury,” with a particular focus on his materialism and moral philosophy. He argues that most scholars have ignored the contemporary reaction to Hobbes and thus have failed to realize the importance of the historical context against which the analysis of Hobbes’s ideas can be measured.

Miscamble, Wilson D., C.S.C
For Notre Dame
For Notre Dame

For Notre Dame gathers together the important contributions of a devoted Holy Cross priest to the continuing debate over the mission and identity of the University of Notre Dame. Read together, these essays and addresses by one of the most consistent and committed participants in this ongoing discussion serve to cast vital light on many of the major issues that Notre Dame has confronted in the past two decades.

Monk, Ray and Palmer, Anthony, editors
Bertrand Russell and the Origins of Analytical Philosophy
Bertrand Russell and the Origins of Analytical Philosophy

This collection of new essays from distinguished philosophers and Russell scholars explores Russell’s own unique and enduringly important contribution to shaping the concerns and the methods of contemporary analytical philosophers. It includes both general discussions of the nature of analytical philosophy and minutely detailed analyses of Russell’s own arguments, and covers the whole range of Russell’s famously varied output. Contributors include Nicholas Griffin, Peter Hylton , A. C. Grayling, C. M. Kilmister, and others.

Montesquieu (Charles de Secondat, Baron de Montesquieu)
Persian Letters
Persian Letters

“Jokes in a serious work are acceptable on the condition that they hide a profound sense beneath a trivial form. It is in this way that Montesquieu, in his novel, Persian Letters, has written one of the most philosophical books of the eighteenth century.” – Alexis de Tocqueville

Montgomery, Marion
With Walker Percy at the Tupperware Party
With Walker Percy at the Tupperware Party

Montgomerymakes a retrospective journey with Walker Percy, as Percy comes to an accommodation with the modern world in company with other companionable journeymen. Percy himself enjoyed a large company of pilgrims who prove amenable to his vision of the human condition – in Percy’s words, man is “in a predicament and on the move in a real world of real things, a world which is a sacrament and a mystery,” words celebratively spoken of as “the holiness of the ordinary,” as opposed to what he called the “losangelization” of the popular spirit, a spirit which increasingly takes refuge in enclaves of “selves” in the relapse into tribalism celebrated as our “New Age.”

Montgomery, Marion
Romancing Reality
Romancing Reality

The concern in this essay is for our age as one suffering an intellectual severance between our response to existential reality in which the beauty of a created particular thing is divorced from the Cause of that thing’s existence. The separation speaks of a deracination of homo viator – the person on his way. It is a consequence of what may be called the Modernist Ideology of the Self, by which the ideological reduction of reality usurps the mystery of soul into the concept of self.

Montgomery, Marion
Making
Making

A positive engagement of the complementary dimensions of intellect that St. Thomas calls the intellectus (intuitive) and the ratio (rational), Making enlarges the concept of making as that capacity to our nature as persons whereby we exercise stewardship in the world, whether in the making of a garden or of a poem. Demanding and provocative, Making examines significant levels of “disorientation of intellect” in the modern world.

Morgan, Frank
Both Sides of the Altar
Both Sides of the Altar

Why would a priest turn his back on his priesthood and walk away from his religious vocation and its demanding responsibilities? Why did he become a priest in the first place? And how do such men make reparations for their defection? Both Sides of the Altar strives to look at these questions through one such priest’s life, that of Frank Morgan.

Morrisey, Will
Herman Melville's Ship of State
Herman Melville's Ship of State

Morrisey writes with lucidity and weaves together elements of history, literature, politics and perhaps his own affinity for Ishmael’s passenger spirit to reveal just how broad and boundless of a narrative Melville’s Moby Dick truly is.

Morrisey, Will
Shakespeare's Politic Comedy
Shakespeare's Politic Comedy

Will Morrisey again considers the political dimensions of literary classics, as previously seen in Melville’s Ship of State (2019). His attention to Shakespeare’s comedies is a reader’s and playgoer’s delight. 

Murray, Paul, O.P.
Moling in Meditation
Moling in Meditation

These quiet, surprising, amazing poems deliver to the reader fresh contact with wisdom for life––lessons we should have known had we paused a little more and looked, things we may have known and lost track of, insights we perhaps sense and now can finally grasp with these words of Moling––of Paul Murray––sharing with us his thoughts, his prayers, his stories of struggle and grace. These poems are “the hidden lost language of the soul” revealed.

 Jeremy Driscoll, O.S.B. Abbot of Mount Angel Abbey

Nash, Richard
John Craige's Mathematical Principles of Christian Theology
John Craige's Mathematical Principles of Christian Theology

Seventeenth-century mathematician Craige attempted to determine the earliest possible date of the Apocalypse by using the most current mathematical and philosophical reasoning, but, more often than not, he was ridiculed as an eccentric and a crank.

Nemeth, Charles P.
Aquinas on Crime
Aquinas on Crime

Not much escapes the intellect and imagination of the Angelic Doctor, St. Thomas Aquinas. Whether it be love, children, education, moral reasoning, happiness or the proper dispositions for human existence, St. Thomas seems an expert in all of it. Crime and criminal conduct are no exceptions to this general tendency with him. Not only does he have much to say about it, what he relates is perpetually fresh and surely the bedrock of what is now taken for granted. In this short treatise, the focus targets St. Thomas’s criminal codification – his law of crimes.

Newcomb, Mark
Ark, the Covenant, and the Poor Men's Chest, The
The Ark, the Covenant, and the Poor Men's Chest

What role did Humanism play in the emergence of English Protestantism? This question has remained a live issue for Reformation scholarship over the past four centuries. In the Ark, the Covenant, and the Poor Men’s Chest, the author examines the issue in detail, utilizing categories drawn from the research of John W. O’Malley on the application of different modes of classical rhetoric to biblical interpretation during the Renaissance.

 

Niemeyer, Gerhart
Between Nothingness and Paradise
Between Nothingness and Paradise

This highly relevant essay by the prominent political philosopher has as its central theme the feature common to all totalitarian ideologies, “the total critique of society” that social criticism that rejects not this or that injustice but damns the entire “system” and overshadows an entire historical period.

Niemeyer, Gerhart
Loss and Recovery of Truth, The
The Loss and Recovery of Truth

That the United States is currently in the midst of a serious crisis, even an ideological civil war, which is part of the general and prolonged crisis of Western civilization is obvious to any thoughtful observer. One of the most perceptive observers of the development of this crisis was Gerhart Niemeyer. As a fugitive from Nazi Germany, a devout Christian, and a political theorist who had mastered the philosophical tradition and the Communist worldview, he was particularly well equipped to discern the ways in which the various modern ideologies insidiously erode the substance of truth and order in contemporary society and to seek remedies in the return to the ontological and spiritual roots of order in the Western tradition.

Nietzsche, Friedrich
Prefaces to Unwritten Works
Prefaces to Unwritten Works

Prefaces to Unwritten Works is a collection of five essays, prefaces to books that Nietzsche never went on to write. Nietzsche himself put these prefaces together in the form of a small leather-bound, handwritten book, and gave that book to Cosima Wagner as a Christmas present in 1872. The dedicatory letter indicates that Nietzsche sent this little book to Cosima “in heartfelt reverence and as an answer to verbal and epistolary questions.” As such, this work is a window into Nietzsche’s relations with the Wagners at the height of their association, but it is also a continuation of Nietzsche’s radical confrontation with Greek antiquity that had begun with the then-recently published Birth of Tragedy. The Wagners read Nietzsche’s book of prefaces on the evening of New Year’s Day 1873, and Cosima records in her diary five days later that at night, “again” she reflected about the essence of art as a consequence of Nietzsche’s work. A month later, Cosima sent Nietzsche a letter encouraging him to write at least two of the books promised by his prefaces.