Author

Koons, Robert C.
Is St. Thomas's Aristotelian Philosophy of Nature Obsolete?
Is St. Thomas's Aristotelian Philosophy of Nature Obsolete?

“The Analytic Thomist,” Rob Koons, delivered the 2021 Aquinas Lecture at the University of Dallas. Here he engages the possibility of a bridge between philosophy and metaphysics proper. Koons boldly lays out his position: without Aristotelian metaphysics, there is no Aristotelian philosophy of nature, and there is no philosophy of nature in Aristotle without acknowledging his natural science. His lecture thus challenges Thomists and their respective approaches to hylomorphism and their all too frequent quickness to discard it. (Koon lays down the gauntlet. if one denies hylomorphism there can be no transubstantiation!) 
 

Kreeft, Peter
Sea Within, The
The Sea Within

Peter Kreeft isn’t just another major Renaissance man. Author of dozens of works in theology, philosophy, and logic, including a unique series of books designed to introduce major philosophers using the Socratic Method, Kreeft also created Socratic Logic, from St. Augustine’s Press, a non-symbolic logic text that bills itself as using Socratic method, Platonic questions, and Aristotelian principles.

Kreeft, Peter
Socratic Logic (3rd edition)
Socratic Logic (3rd edition)

This new and revised edition of Peter Kreeft’s Socratic Logic is updated, adding new exercises and more complete examples, all with Kreeft’s characteristic clarity and wit. Since its introduction in the spring of 2004, Socratic Logic has proven to be a different type of logic text:
 

Kreeft, Peter
Socrates Meets Machiavelli
Socrates Meets Machiavelli

What if we could overhear a conversation in the afterlife between Socrates and Machiavelli, in which Machiavelli has to submit to an Oxford tutorial style examination of his book conducted by Socrates using his famous method of cross-examination? How might the conversation go?

This imaginative thought-experiment makes for both imaginative drama and a good lesson in logic, in moral and political philosophy, in “how to read a book,” and in the history of early modern thought.

Kreeft, Peter
I Surf, Therefore I Am
I Surf, Therefore I Am

This is the first book about surfing ever written by a philosopher. The author, a 70-year-old surfanatic, has been Professor of Philosophy at Boston College for over 40 years and has written 50 other books on philosophy, religion, and culture. But compared to this one, the others are nothing but straw..

Kreeft, Peter
Ocean Full of Angels, An
An Ocean Full of Angels

[In the author’s words:] I have written almost sixty books, but this one is very different from all the others. For one thing, it took 20 years. I had to wait patiently for it to grow, like a tree. I was not in control of it; it kept changing, as I watched at it and let it do what it did, like an animal out of its cage.

Kreeft, Peter
Jesus-Shock
Jesus-Shock

The point of the title: Imagine a storm has downed a telephone wire so that everyone who touches it is shocked in every cell of his body. Well, the storm of God’s crazy love has “downed” (incarnated) Jesus, and everyone who touches this “live wire” is shocked in every cell of his soul.

Kreeft, Peter
Ethics for Beginners
Ethics for Beginners

This is not a typical ethics textbook.

Most ethics textbooks are anthologies of articles by contemporary philosophers, or a whole book by one contemporary philosopher, about ethical puzzles to be solved by logical analysis. This is good mental exercise but it will not change your life, and you will not remember it ten years from now. You will not remember a hundred bright little ideas, you will remember only a few Big Ideas, the ones that changed your life. This book is about 52 of them... 

Kreeft, Peter
Philosophy of Jesus, The
The Philosophy of Jesus

Amazingly, no one ever seems to have looked at Jesus as a philosopher, or his teaching as philosophy. Yet no one in history has ever had a more radically new philosophy, or made more of a difference to philosophy, than Jesus. He divided all human history into two, into "B.C." and "A.D."; and the history of philosophy is crucial to human history, since philosophy is crucial to man; so how could He not also divide philosophy?

Kreeft, Peter
Platonic Tradition, The
The Platonic Tradition

The Platonic tradition in Western philosophy is not just one of many equally central traditions. It is so much THE central one that the very existence and survival of Western civilization depends on it. It is like the Confucian tradition in Chinese culture, or the monotheistic tradition in religion, or the human rights tradition in politics.

Kreeft, Peter
Socrates' Children - Ancient Philosophers
Socrates' Children - Ancient

Kreeft focuses on the “big ideas” that have influenced present people and present times, and includes relevant biographical data, proportionate to its importance for each thinker. Moreover, the aim of the work is to stimulate philosophizing, controversy, and argument. It uses ordinary language and logic, not jargon and symbolic logic, and it is commonsensical (like Aristotle) and existential in the sense that it sees philosophy as something to be lived and experienced in life. Philosophy, after all, is not about philosophy but reality . . . about wisdom, life and death, good and evil, and God.

Kreeft, Peter
Socrates' Children - Medieval
Socrates' Children - Medieval

This is the second of a four-volume history of philosophy. Kreeft seeks to be simple and direct and clear. But it is not dumbed down and patronizing. It will stretch the reader, but it is meant for beginners, not just scholars. It can be used for college classes or do-it-yourselfers. It emphasizes surprises; remember, “philosophy begins in wonder.” And it includes visual aids: charts, cartoons, line drawings, and drawings of each philosopher.

Kreeft, Peter
Socrates' Children - Contemporary
Socrates' Children – Contemporary

Kreeft focuses on the “big ideas” that have influenced present people and present times, and includes relevant biographical data, proportionate to its importance for each thinker. Moreover, the aim of the work is to stimulate philosophizing, controversy, and argument. It uses ordinary language and logic, not jargon and symbolic logic, and it is commonsensical (like Aristotle) and existential in the sense that it sees philosophy as something to be lived and experienced in life. Philosophy, after all, is not about philosophy but reality . . . about wisdom, life and death, good and evil, and God.

Kreeft, Peter
Socrates' Children - Modern
Socrates' Children - Modern

This is the third of a four-volume history of philosophy . . . on ancient, medieval, modern, and contemporary philosophy. After the fourth volume is produced in paper, a one-volume clothbound edition, containing all four paperbound editions, will be published.

Kreeft, Peter
Socratic Introduction to Plato's Republic, A
A Socratic Introduction to Plato's Republic

This book is designed for three classes of people:

(1) Beginners who want an introduction to philosophy;

(2) Those who have already had an introduction to philosophy and who would like to see it in action now applied to a great book written by a great philosophy, but who have never read Plato’s Republic, the most famous and influential philosophy book ever written;

(3) Those who have read Plato’s Republic before but did not understand its deepest significance.

Kreeft, Peter
If Einstein Had Been a Surfer
If Einstein Had Been a Surfer

(1) Science, (2) philosophy, and (3) poetry, myth, and mysticism are three modes of consciousness that are radically different today. We are usually very good at carefully distinguishing them so as not to corrupt them, reduce them, or to confuse them with each other. But almost no one tries to connect them in a synthesis in which each maintains its own identity yet each contributes to a greater whole that no one of them could attain alone – like a happy marriage. If we bring them together at all, it is only to focus in three different ways on a specific issue (like health care, or children’s literature, or gender roles).If Einstein Had Been a Surfer dares to do it for Everything, or rather for a “Theory of Everything” that only scientists today dare to talk about. But how can a “theory of the whole” be discovered by a brain that is less than a whole brain?

Kreeft, Peter
Summa Philosophica
Summa Philosophica

Next to the Socratic Method, the best method for organizing a logical debate over a controversial philosophical or theological issue is the method St. Thomas Aquinas uses in the Summa Theologiae. As the charm of the Socratic dialogue is its dramatic length, its uncertainty, and the psychological dimension of a clash between live characters, so the charm of the Summa method is the opposite: its condensation and its impersonality, objectivity, simplicity, directness, and logical clarity. 

Kreeft, Peter
Ecumenical Jihad
Ecumenical Jihad

Juxtaposing “ecumenism” and “jihad,” two words that many would consider strange and at odds with one another, Peter Kreeft argues that we need to change our current categories and alignments. We need to realize that we are at war and that the sides have changed radically. Documenting the spiritual and moral decay that has taken hold of modern society, Kreeft issues a wake-up call to all God-fearing Christians, Jews, and Muslims to unite together in a “religious war” against the common enemy of godless secular humanism, materialism, and immorality.

Kreeft, Peter
Ha!
Ha!

 "This book almost didn't exist. I was about to write a serious, heavy book entitled How To Save Western Civilization, as a sequel to my book How To Destroy Western Civilization and Other Ideas from the Cultural Abyss. But writing it was not making me happy, and reading it was not going to make anybody else happy either. And then I stopped just long enough for my guardian angel to squeeze through that tiny window of opportunity that I had opened up by my silence and to whisper this commonsense question into my subconscious: "Why not make them happy instead?" (Angels specialize in common sense.)

Kreft, Peter
Socrates Meets Kierkegaard
Socrates Meets Kierkegaard

No philosopher since Augustine had more strings to his bow than Søren Kierkegaard. He wrote from many points of view, in many literary styles, about many topics (not all of them traditional philosophical topics). He should have written novels or plays, for he turned himself into a different character every time he wrote a new book. Is there a philosopher who has ever exceeded the quantity, quality and variety of his output in such a short time?

Kreft, Peter
Socrates Meets Freud
Socrates Meets Freud

Probably no single thinker since Jesus has influenced the thoughts and lives of more people living in the Western world today than Sigmund Freud. Even agnostics like William Barrett, in Irrational Man, and atheists like Nietzsche, agree that the single most radical change in the last thousand years of Western civilization has been the decline of religion. And the four most influential critics of religion have certainly been Nietzsche, Marx, Darwin, and Freud. Of the four, Freud is by far the most popular.

Kuby, Gabriele
Abandoned Generation, The
The Abandoned Generation

A broken family throws formidable stumbling blocks onto the path of life that a society as a whole must traverse. But the stones under the feet of the children in these situations are the most hurtful and most in need of redress. Gabriele Kuby answers the call and does so with an acute sense of responsibility. As a child of divorce and later divorcee, Kuby speaks to herself when she urges the men and women of her generation to consider how failing as spouses we fail as parents, and as such cause the most trouble for our children. 

La Rochefoucauld
Maxims
Maxims

This is the first-ever French-English edition of La Rochefoucauld’s Réflexions, ou sentences et maximes morales, long known in English simply as the Maxims. The translation, the first to appear in forty years, is completely new and aims – unlike all previous versions – at being as literal as possible. This involves, among other things, rendering the same word – for example, amour-propre as “self-love” – as consistently throughout as good sense allows. This also means that the translators have made every effort to maintain La Rochefoucauld’s word order. This allows the reader the best vantage point for viewing La Rochefoucauld’s dramatic and paradoxical juxtapositions of words and ideas, juxtapositions of the utmost importance to understanding his thought. Despite the translation’s concern with literalness, careful attention has been paid to the nuances of the literary character of the Maxims. In addition, this work contains a series of detailed indices that will greatly aid the reader in finding just the right maxim, and an updated version, in English, of the original French index of the work.

Langan, Jeffrey J., translator and commentary by
French Revolution Confronts Pius VI, The
The French Revolution Confronts Pius VI

The writings of Pope Pius VI, head of the Catholic Church during the most destructive period of the French Revolution, were compiled in two volumes by M.N.S. Guillon and published in 1798 and 1800. But during the Revolution, the reign of Napoleon, and the various revolutionary movements of the 19th century, there were extraordinary efforts to destroy writings that critiqued the revolutionary ideology. Many books and treatises, if they survived the revolution or the sacking from Napoleon’s armies. To this day, no public copy of Guillon’s work exists in Paris.

Langford, Jerome J.
Galileo, Science and the Church
Galileo, Science and the Church

Widely recognized as a classic account of the circumstances, issues, and consequences of Galileo’s tragic confrontation with the theologians, Galileo, Science and the Church is now available in a sewn, clothbound edition for the first time in more than thirty years.

Lasseter, Rollin A.
Cast of Valor, The
The Cast of Valor

In stark and bracing contrast with the signature narcissism and self-pity of contemporary verse, The Cast of Valor is not “feeling verse,” nor is it confessional or even personal. This is true poetry, communal in the greater Christian tradition and anchored in universal human experience. Traditional English verse is employed by the poet in meter and rhyme, but the subject matter is far from archaic in theme and perspective. This poetry is universal in its consideration of historic parallels in individual, personal lives. Born in Nashville, Tennessee, and educated at Vanderbilt and Yale, Rollin Lasseter formed his poetic imagination half a century ago by his mentors in faith and verse – Donald Davidson, Cleanth Brooks, Dorothy L. Sayers, Charles Williams, and W. B. Yeats – and accompany the author into the religious challenges of the millennium. The modern soul is exiled from religious certainties and conventional understanding. It must either reconcile to permanent exile from the disorder of modern culture, or find the connection to Faith that would allow a permanent home in God’s order.

Lawler, Peter
Allergic to Crazy
Allergic to Crazy

Allergic to Crazy features a stunningly diverse array of brief reflections by one of America’s leading public intellectuals. Each of these short, pointed, and witty essays applies the wisdom of postmodern conservatism to the issues that rightly occupy so much of life these days.

Lawler, Peter Augustine
Homeless and at Home in America
Homeless and at Home in America

Here is a broad and deep exploration of the many ways that today’s Americans are the most and least homeless of the people of the contemporary West. Contemporary Europeans may largely be in the thrall of a postpolitical, postreligious, and postfamilial fantasy, or so alienated that they no longer recognize their alienation. But we Americans are relatively at home with our homelessness, and so comparatively capable of experiencing ourselves not primarily as rootless individuals but as at home as family members, citizens, and creatures still capable of exercising truthfully our familial, political, and religious responsibilities. But the moral and religious practice of Americans is progressively more endangered by their individualistic theory, and even pious, evangelical Americans have trouble explaining themselves to themselves, much less to their fellow citizens. Our democratic concern with the genuine significance of particular individuals – and so with genuinely liberal education – is threatened by the self-denial that produces the theory that human morality can be captured by the theory of selfinterest rightly understood, and even more so by theories that deny the very existence of the self with interests.

Lawler, Peter Augustine
American Heresies and Higher Education
American Heresies and Higher Education

These closely interrelated essays explore who we think we are and what we believe we’re supposed to do as free and relational persons these days.

Lefler, Nathan
Tale of a Criminal Mind Gone Good
Tale of a Criminal Mind Gone Good

In this concise and creative book, Nathan Lefler places G. K. Chesterton and René Girard in conversation on the art of being deceived. The campaign to get rid of (or mythicize) the Judaic and the Christian is not progress, it is a fog. Girard noted early on that returning preeminent status to the Judeo-Christian influence would have the (paradoxical) effect of clearing the air, such that humans might actually breathe and reason well again. 

Lehnert, Sister M. Pascalina
His Humble Servant
His Humble Servant

This is a personal and insightful portrait of Pope Pius XII, the memories of Sister M. Pascalina Lehnert, who served as his housekeeper for forty years. Her book, most of it written just a few months after the Pope’s death, shares insights into the person, the life, and the thinking of Pius XII, from his time as Nuncio in Munich until his death. Much of Sister’s motivation in writing this work was to correct the many distortions of fact and interpretation regarding this great pope.

Lewis, C. S. and Calabria, Don Giovanni
Latin Letters of C. S. Lewis, The
The Latin Letters of C. S. Lewis

In September 1947, after reading The Screwtape Letters in Italian, Fr. Giovanni Calabria was moved to write the author, but he knew no English, so he addressed his letter in Latin. Therein began a correspondence that was to outlive Fr. Calabria himself (he died in December 1954 and was succeeded in the correspondence by Fr. Luigi Pedrollo).

Locke, John
Reasonableness of Christianity, The
The Reasonableness of Christianity

This is an indispensable document for anyone interested in the progress of Locke’s thinking about the laws of nature, morality, religion, and the limits of reason, and it is a landmark text in the history of biblical and historical theology. As fashions in philosophy turn from logical analysis to the interpretation of texts, the method that Locke employs in this work is both instructive and prescient. It was and remains a controversial text. This edition contains the two Vindications Locke wrote in response to the attacks of his critics.

Longin, Sheryl and Simon, Roger L.
Party Line, The
The Party Line

The Party Line is a historical drama. Using real and fictional characters, it intermingles the story of Walter Duranty – the New York Times’ Pulitzer Prize-winning Moscow correspondent in the 1930s – with the more contemporary story of Dutch politician Pim Fortuyn, who was assassinated in 2002, on the eve of becoming prime minister.

 

Lorenzini, Daniele
Jacques Maritain and Human Rights
Jacques Maritain and Human Rights

Lorenzini’s work is a formidable contribution to the literature pertaining to the period of post-war thought and Maritain on human rights. In his labors to carefully digest the full span of Maritain’s intellectual trajectory on rights, Lorenzini brings Jacques Maritain alive both as a man of vision but also fervent action, and defends him from critics and historians that accuse him of spurning Church teaching and papal authority. As Lorenzini’s study shows, the human rights of the secular-civic world––whose lineage scholars attribute in large part to Maritain––were always derived from Catholic teaching and intended for use in constructing the truly Christian city.

Lowenthal, David
Slave State
Slave State

David Lowenthal transposes present society onto that in the novel, 1984, and illustrates “how the quest for a perfect society led instead to the worst––in the course of revolting against which the true ends of life are established.” It is more than suspicion: the year 2021 is 1984. What many understand by instinct, Lowenthal here articulates in clear terms using the political prophesy of this no longer futuristic literature. To be one without truthful unity? This is the picture of human brotherhood ushering in the only thing worse than inequality––enslavement. 

Luckhardt, C. G., editor
Wittgenstein
Wittgenstein

The eleven essays in this collection are of two sorts – those which present new sources for the study of Wittgenstein’s philosophy, and those which relate particular aspects of his work to that of other thinkers. Contributors include Georg Henrik von Wright, P. M. S. Hacker, Gordon Baker, and David Pears.

Lukacs, John
Confessions of an Original Sinner
Confessions of an Original Sinner

In this eloquent and thought-provoking “autohistory,” John Lukacs, distinguished historian and writer, describes the history of his own convictions and beliefs. The journey takes us from the Hungary of the 1930s and the ravaged Budapest of World War II to Lukacs’s discovery of the New World, his forays into the intellectual life of New York City, and finally his settling in Philadelphia.

Lukacs, John
We at the Center of the Universe
We at the Center of the Universe

In a work that defies category, the remarkable John Lukacs has combined science and philosophy to open our eyes to accept our need to know, our purpose for knowing, our response to the world

MacIntyre, Alasdair
Unconscious, The
The Unconscious

This is one of the most stimulating of MacIntyre’s early writings, in which he distinguishes between the two uses of the Freudian term “unconscious”: the descriptive, where Freud is seen as offering a non-causal description of psychological phenomena; and the explanatory, where he seems to be making correlations between crucial childhood events and adult behavior. Noting that the concept of the unconscious is one that has strongly captured the public mind, MacIntyre seeks to discover what it means to assert the existence of the unconscious rather than assess the empirical grounds for such an assertion. His explanation takes in the nature of psychological theory and the problems raised by our ordinary pre-Freudian view of the mind. “[I]nteresting and very suggestive.” – Philosophical Review

Mahoney, Daniel J.
Other Solzhenitsyn, The
The Other Solzhenitsyn

This book above all explores philosophical, political, and moral themes in Solzhenitsyn’s two masterworks, The Gulag Archipelago and The Red Wheel, as well as in his great European novel In the First Circle. We see Solzhenitsyn as analyst of revolution, defender of the moral law, phenomenologist of ideological despotism, and advocate of “resisting evil with force.”

Mahoney, Daniel J.
Recovering Politics, Civilization, and the Soul
Recovering Politics, Civilization, and the Soul

The Western inheritance is under sustained theoretical and practical assault. Legitimate self-criticism has given way to nihilistic self-loathing and cultural, moral, and political repudiation is the order of the day. Yet, as Daniel J. Mahoney shows in this learned, eloquent, and provocative set of essays, two contemporary philosophic thinkers, Roger Scruton and Pierre Manent, have––separately and together––traced a path for the renewal of politics and practical reason, our civilized inheritance, the natural moral law, and the soul as the enduring site of self-conscious reflection, moral and civic agency, and mutual accountability.

Mandell, Ted
Heart Stoppers and Hail Marys
Heart Stoppers and Hail Marys

Heart Stoppers and Hail Marys makes you realize why college football is part of America's DNA. These games are the type that cause heartache, tears, and joy . . . all-in-one!” – Beano Cook, ESPN

Mander, W. J., editor
Perspectives on the Logic and Metaphysics of F. H. Bradley
Perspectives on the Logic and Metaphysics of F. H. Bradley

Covers all aspects of Bradley’s work on logic and metaphysics, from his critique of relational thought to his doctrine of immediate experience. Contributors include Donald Baxter, James Bradley, Richard Ingardia, James Allard, Phillip Ferreira, and others.

Manent, Pierre
Seeing Things Politically
Seeing Things Politically

These autobiographical and philosophical essays, in the form of expertly probing interviews, provide a superb introduction to the work of one of the most significant contemporary political philosophers and a marvelously readable perspective on the French intellectual and political arenas from the 1970s to the present.

Manent, Pierre
Beyond Radical Secularism
Beyond Radical Secularism

This is the book that took France by storm upon its publication in the fall of 2015. It was praised by some for its rare combination of tough-mindedness and moderation and attacked by others for suggesting that radical secularism could not provide the political and spiritual resources to address the Islamic challenge. The book is even more relevant after the Parisian terror attacks of November 13, 2015. It is a book that combines permanence and relevance, that addresses a pressing political and civilizational problem in a manner that will endure.

Manent, Pierre
Religion of Humanity, The
Religion of Humanity, The

"Is not modern democracy the finally-found form of the religion of Humanity?" (2007)
     The Religion of Humanity: The Illusion of Our Times is the first anthology in any language of the writings of the contemporary French political philosopher, Pierre Manent, on “the religion of Humanity.”  The striking phrase comes from nineteenth-century French thinker, Auguste Comte (1798–1857). Comte coined the phrase and indeed created an atheistic religion of a self-adoring Humanity.  In the aftermath of the Cold War, Manent observed victorious democracy interpreting itself in a similar framework. He took it upon himself to track this development, analyze it, and warn his fellow Europeans of its deleterious political, intellectual, moral, and spiritual effects. With conceptual precision and (most often) a sober tone, many contemporary sacred cows were gored.   But in addition to cursing the humanitarian darkness, he also lit many candles of judicious political, philosophical, moral, and spiritual analysis. This anthology is thus almost unique in its subject matter, and certainly unique in its treatment of the subject. It is a rarity and gem: a first-rate work of political philosophy.

Marcel, Gabriel
Mystery of Being Vol. I: Reflection and Mystery
Mystery of Being Vol. I: Reflection and Mystery

The Mystery of Being contains the most systematic exposition of the philosophical thought of Gabriel Marcel, a convert to Catholicism and the most distinguished twentieth-century exponent of Christian existentialism. Its two volumes are the Gifford lectures which Marcel delivered in Aberdeen, Scotland, in 1949 and 1950. Marcel’s work fundamentally challenges most of the major positions of the atheistic existentialists (Sartre, Beauvoir, Camus), especially their belief in an absurd, meaningless, godless universe. These volumes deal with almost all of the major themes of Marcel’s thought: the nature of philosophy, our broken world, man’s deep ontological need for being, our incarnate bodily existence, primary and secondary reflection, participation, being in situation, the identity of the human self, intersubjectivity, mystery and problem, faith, hope, and the reality of God, and immortality.

Marcel, Gabriel
Homo Viator
Homo Viator

This edition of Marcel’s inspiring Homo Viator has been updated to includle fifty pages of new materials available for the first time in English, making this the first English-language edition to conform to the standard French edition. Here, Christianity’s foremost existentialist of the twentieth century gives us a prodigious personal insight on ‘man on the way’ that will reinforce and commend our own pilgrimages in hope.

Marcel, Gabriel
Thou Shall Not Die
Thou Shall Not Die

Compiled here for the first time are some pithy and incisive sayings of philosopher/playwright Gabriel Marcel, which give rich insight into his spirituality. Written with particular attention to the nature of man’s mortality and his longing for life and sure knowledge of his death, this intimate self-portrait introduces a new Marcel to the reader of his intricate philosophy, perhaps best said by Anne Marcel...