Author

Cropsey, Joseph
On Humanity's Intensive Introspection
On Humanity's Intensive Introspection

The essays and lectures first collected here span a period of over 25 years and cover the greater part of Joseph Cropsey’s illustrious career of scholarship and teaching at the University of Chicago. They are presented in the order in which he wrote them. The central problem of human thought and existence, according to Cropsey, is that it is absolutely impossible for a human being to understand his human condition without understanding his position within the whole of which the human is only a part. Our imperfect knowledge of the whole therefore places limits on our knowledge of ourselves, for we do not know where we stand in relation to the whole that conditions us, and therewith our own condition. What then should we do in the face of our irremediable ignorance and uncertainty?

Cropsey, Joseph
Polity and Economy
Polity and Economy

To perceive Adam Smith’s place in the stream of Enlightenment philosophy is to gain an indispensable insight into our own condition as denizens of the liberal capitalist society. Before Smith was the author of An Inquiry into the Nature andCauses of the Wealth of Nations, he was the author of The Theory of Moral Sentiments. The earlier work establishes Smith unmistakably as among those thinkers who aspired to describe the human condition in terms of motivation, of cause and effect, thus in terms of the principles of nature itself, of nature as mechanism, not nature as edifying teleology. Precisely because morality was not to be traced to any homiletic beyond nature or to a volition with nature, the thinkers of the modern order assumed responsibility for locating the ground of true moral virtue within mechanical nature alone. And just as the locating of mankind within a remorseless system of cause and effect could be the reduction of humanity to the status of robotic slavery, it became the self-assigned task of the thinkers in question to demonstrate that the natural order was one not of etiological bondage but of freedom in an elevated sense.

Crosby, John F. and Betty, Stafford
What Does It Mean to Be a Christian?
What Does It Mean to Be a Christian?

This book presents a correspondence between two friends who disagree about how to answer the question, “What does it mean to be a Christian?” Crosby argues that Christians understand themselves as hearing a definitive word of revelation spoken by God and intended for all human beings. But Betty sees Christianity as one of several options, usually the preferred way for those born in the faith, but no more unique or special than Hinduism or Buddhism.

Davis, Darin H., ED.
Educating for Wisdom in the 21st Century
Educating for Wisdom in the 21st Century

With essays from Anthony Kronman, Andrew Delbanco, Darin Davis, Celia Deane-Drummond, John Haldane, and Walter Brueggemann, this volume brings together a distinguished and diverse group of voices to consider this timely and important topic.

Davis, Michael
Wonderlust
Wonderlust

At a time when the cost of undergraduate education is soaring, it is worth attempting to gain some clarity about what liberal education is really for. Wonderlust attempts to sneak up on this question by both describing and exemplifying the centrality of wonder in thinking, and so in education. In the day-to-day life of an undergraduate college certain occasions call for reflection on the nature of a liberal-arts education – orientations and graduations, to be sure, but also panel discussions and talks of various sorts. Because events of this kind encourage thought about our lives as wholes, they are especially rich opportunities to make manifest the close connection between philosophy and everyday life. Most of the essays in this book were originally lectures for such occasions, composed by the author over a period of thirty years while teaching at several undergraduate institutions. The essays seek to avoid a double danger: they are both academic and practical. For learning is empty if it sheds no light on the pressing questions of contemporary life, and, at the same time, the day-to-day experience of ordinary life is rich in philosophical implications the importance of which reaches far beyond the day to day. The slightly off humor of a Gary Larson cartoon can teach us something about Aristotle’s Metaphysics. The enormous significance of the execution of Socrates by the city of Athens has echoes in the question of the imposition of speech codes in the contemporary university. This mixture of the day to day and the philosophical in the experience of wonder is the heart of liberal education. Wonderlust is meant to be of help in recognizing when it is present.

Davis, Michael
Poetry of Philosophy, The
The Poetry of Philosophy

Although Aristotle’s Poetics is the most frequently read of his works, philosophers and political theorists have, for the most part, left analysis of the text to literary critics and classicists. In this book Michael Davis argues convincingly that in addition to teaching us something about poetry, Poetics contains an understanding of the common structure of human action and human thought that connects it to Aristotle’s other writings on politics and morality. Davis demonstrates that the duality of Poetics reaches out to the philosopher, writer, and political theorist and shows the importance of the ideal in our imaginings of and goals for the future.

Deely, John
What Distinguishes Human Understanding?
What Distinguishes Human Understanding?

In 1982, the author of this book issued a “promissory note” of just the sort that analytic philosophers of the twentieth century have led us to expect will come to nothing. This particular “note” occurred as a passing remark in the concluding chapter of his Introducing Semiotic (Indiana University Press, p. 187, text and note 4) to the effect that it would be possible to establish the classical distinction between sense and intellect by means of the analysis of the role of relations in the action of signs.

Deely, John
Basics of Semiotics
Basics of Semiotics

"Deely's book, the only successful modern English introduction to semiotics, is a clear, creative, and provocative synthesis of major trends, past and present." - Thomas A. Sebeok, Indiana University

Deely, John
Semiotic Animal
Semiotic Animal

A semiotic animal is an animal that lives with the awareness that the action of signs is more fundamental to the constitution of human experience than are either objects or things.

Deely, John
Impact on Philosophy of Semiotics, The
The Impact on Philosophy of Semiotics

This book is a coherent argument about the meaning of the term "postmodern" is it applies to philosophy at the opening of the twenty-first century. The author makes the case that the twentieth-century development of the doctrine of signs, commonly known as semiotics, represents the positive essential thrust giving birth to a postmodern era of philosophy, as clean a break with modern thought as modern thought was with Latin scholasticism in the time of Galileo, Poinsot, and Descartes – but with a difference. Contrary to what the author dismisses as false claims of postmodernity, the work shows that what is truly postmodern in philosophy both goes beyond modernity and recovers philosophy’s past in a renewed understanding of the human condition. The "problem of the external world," which modern philosophy began by creating, postmodern philosophy begins by revealing as a quasi-error. The book concludes with a philosophical dialogue revealing the inadequacy to the postmodern situation of a simple return to any past form of "realism."

Deely, John
Medieval Philosophy Redefined as the Latin Age
Medieval Philosophy Redefined as the Latin Age

In a statement published for Paul Cobley’s edition of Realism for the 21st Century. A John Deely Reader, Umberto Eco wrote that “John Deely has not only paid attention to the Second Scholasticism but also to the first one”. In the present book, Deely goes one step further, by establishing the continuity of the Latin Age as a whole. He shows how the Latin thinkers demonstrated the presuppositions and created the framework of critical thought that made possible and inevitable the turn to science in the modern sense. 

Deneen, Patrick J.
Conserving America?
Conserving America?

This collection of thematic essays by Notre Dame political theorist and public intellectual Patrick Deneen addresses the questions, is there something worth conserving in America, and if so, is America capable of conservation? Can a nation founded in a revolutionary moment that led to the founding of the first liberal nation be thought capable of sustaining and passing on virtues and practices that ennoble? Or is America inherently a nation that idolizes the new over the old, license over ordered liberty, and hedonism over self-rule? Can America conserve what is worth keeping for it to remain—or even become—a Republic?

Di Blasi, Fulvio
From Aristotle to Thomas Aquinas
From Aristotle to Thomas Aquinas

Saint Thomas Aquinas is an Aristotelian (few scholars would question that) and he is the most important author in the entire history of natural law theory. Yet, there is no natural law theory in Aristotle. Even the concept of person, which is so important in Aquinas’ ethics, seems to be foreign to Aristotle’s culture and thought. How can Aquinas’ ethics be said Aristotelian? How can his natural law theory?

Di Blasi, Fulvio; Hochschild, Joshua P. and Langan, Jeffrey
Virtue's End
Virtue's End

The story of Aristotelianism’s revival in recent academic moral philosophy is well known. By the middle of the twentieth century, ethical theory was dominated by versions of utilitarianism and Kantianism. Attention was paid to consequences, rules, intentions, obligations, rights, but the concerns central to an Aristotelian approach – virtue, happiness, contemplation, the summum bonum – remained little more than historical curiosities. Then, thanks to a number of perceptive authors influenced by Aristotle and Aquinas, the Aristotelian tradition regained, if not its former authoritative status, at least full respect as a viable alternative moral philosophy.

Di Blasi, Fulvio; Hochschild, Joshua P.; and Langan, Jeffrey
Ethics Without God?
Ethics Without God?

Ethics Without God? brings the theological perspective of the Aristotelian and Thomistic traditions to bear on a variety of current political and theoretical questions. The main essays explore a place for the role of God in recent academic philosophy and political theory. The volume also explores the implications of two recent books, each a major scholarly venture in theologically realist ethical reflection: a defense of Platonism in John Rist’s Real Ethics and a natural law jurisprudence in Russell Hittinger’s The First Grace. With lengthy essays prompted by these books – four essays each, by prominent theologians, moral philosophers, and political scientists – and with extended responses from Rist and Hittinger, the result is a volume that engages ultimate questions across academic disciplines and intellectual traditions. Fulvio Di Blasi is author ofGod and the Natural Law, from St. Augustine’s Press..

Diclementi, Arthur and Langiulli, Nino
Brooklyn Existentialism
Brooklyn Existentialism

Immortalized by some of the greatest Hollywood films of the 20th century, Italian Brooklyn became one of the icons of American culture. Brooklyn Existentialism shows that the culture of that time and place was more than just an icon. The oxymoronic combination of uprootedness and ethnic solidarity that were found in Brooklyn during the middle years of the 20th century provide an opening that takes the reader not just back to Italy, not just back to Europe, but back to the sources of philosophical realism that made Europe, Italy, and America possible in the first place. Brooklyn Existentialism is ethnophilosophy with a vengeance. It is a take-no-prisoners attack on the bad ideas which have corrupted the academy over the course of the last century combined with an equally frank discussion of the moral mischief these bad ideas have caused.

Dougherty, Jude P.
Briefly Considered
Briefly Considered

In commenting on contemporary social and political issues, Dougherty provides a critique of the humbug that often passes as philosophy. Much of what is published as philosophy, he claims, has little to do with the pursuit of wisdom, and much is written without any knowledge of the history of philosophy – for example, a professor of moral philosophy, by his own admission, lecturing without any knowledge of the Stoics, and another professor at a prominent university, in a nationally televised series of lectures devoted to the history of philosophy, jumping from Plato to Descartes with nothing in between. Dougherty argues that the ancients, no less intelligent or observant than we, have much to say to us about nature, human nature, and the polity. It is from the vantage point of what he takes to be perennial philosophy that Dougherty discusses topics such as “The Acquisition and Use of Power,” “Property as a Condition of Liberty,” “Tolerance.” “Responsibility,” and “The Nature of Scientific Explanation.”

Easton, Patricia, Lennon, Thomas. M. and Sebba, Gregor
Bibliographia Malebranchiana
Bibliographia Malebranchiana

A very complete, annotated bibliographical listing of works on the seventeenth-century philosopher, Nicolas Malebranche (1638–1715).

Emanuela Scribano
Reading Guide to Descartes' <em>Meditations on First Philosophy</em>, A
A Reading Guide to Descartes' Meditations on First Philosophy

The European Enlightenment is a period that contributed concepts that continue to be authoritative in philosophical conversation, and defined the criteria for what is important in the endeavors of human thought even in our own day. Descartes’ Meditations on First Philosophy presents the questions that are responsible for a departure from Scholasticism and the dawn of modern philosophy. To understand Continental Philosophy, and the history that precedes the analytical tradition, one cannot overlook Descartes’ precedent.

Embry, Charles R. and Hughes, Glenn, editors
Timelessness of Proust, The
The Timelessness of Proust

Marcel Proust’s À la recherche du temps perdu—In Search of Lost Time—is one of the most important and influential novels of the modern era. In recent decades, Proust has enjoyed a new surge of critical attention, as well as a sustained growth in readership—well beyond that of other prose masters of twentieth century modernism such as Joyce, Woolf, Kafka, and Beckett. The MLA Bibliography presently lists over 3,000 citations to scholarly works devoted to Proust’s novel, and if one Googles “Proust,” the number of hits exceeds 2,000,000.

Erfourth, Montgomery
Guide to Eric Voegelin's Political Reality, A
A Guide to Eric Voegelin's Political Reality

Eric Voegelin is widely considered one of the most insightful political scientists of the twentieth century, but is sadly not as well known as other contemporaries like Leo Strauss or Hannah Arendt. This is in large part due to the difficulty of the topics he chose to study and the complex nature of the material produced. While there are other books that discuss his biography and academic/philosophical ideas, none combine these ideas with a practical means of actually utilizing Voegelin’s philosophy to define and analyze political reality. This book uniquely applys Voegelin’s ideas to real-world political problems and in its utilization of common language, making Voegelin’s extraordinary achievements much more accessible to a broader audience than any other previous work.

 

Ernest Fortin, A. A.
Christianity and Philosophical Culture in the Fifth Century
Christianity and Philosophical Culture in the Fifth Century

The spirituality and immortality of the soul might seem to be an essential Christian doctrine, but in fact many early Christian writers held that the soul is material and that immortality is a gift. As Ernest Fortin’s study of Claudianus Mamertus (d. 475), a priest of Vienne in Gaul, and his De Statu Animae, On the State of the Soul (ca. 470) shows, St. Augustine did not settle the question. De Statu Animae is the only explicitly philosophical work in the West that we possess between Augustine (354–430) and Boethius. It responds to a defense of the corporeality of the soul by Bishop Faustus of Reii, modern Riez. Like many early Christian writers, Faustus held that God alone is spirit, so that the human soul is material, immortality is a gift, and Platonic dialogues or neo-Platonic textbooks of philosophy are the product of unhealthy curiosity.

Errázuriz, Carlos José
That Which Is Just in the Church
That Which Is Just in the Church

Carlos José Errázuriz, Professor of Canon Law at the Pontifical University of the Holy Cross (Rome) has provided a comprehensive and insightful treatment of rights, justice, and law in the Catholic Church, beginning with the most basic questions regarding the essence of these realities.

Fendt, Gene
Camus' <em>Plague</em>
Camus' Plague

Beyond the presentation of The Plague as a myth, Fendt also provides generous insight into elements of this work that give an autobiographical portrait of Albert Camus´ artistic development. He provides an intelligent challenge to labeling Camus an atheist, if Camus is truly the artist Fendt believes him to be. It is also an unlikely but important contribution to the political philosophical study of solidarity.  

Ferrier, Richard
Declaration of America, The
Declaration of America, The

Richard Ferrier expounds on the basic truth learned from Alan Keyes during work on his political campaign in 1996. "He taught us to see what President Lincoln saw 160 years ago: an American should always take his principles and form his sentiments from those expressed in the Declaration of Independence." Whereas it might seem America is the product of political divorce, the Declaration instead endows our nation with the qualities of a marriage. We are a deliberate union, Ferrier says, and we must strive to live well politically by doing right by the pledge contained in the Declaration.

Feser, Edward
Last Superstition, The
The Last Superstition

The central contention of the “New Atheism” of Richard Dawkins, Daniel Dennett, Sam Harris, and Christopher Hitchens is that there has for several centuries been a war between science and religion, that religion has been steadily losing that war, and that at this point in human history a completely secular scientific account of the world has been worked out in such thorough and convincing detail that there is no longer any reason why a rational and educated person should find the claims of any religion the least bit worthy of attention.

Feser, Edward
Neo-Scholastic Essays
Neo-Scholastic Essays

Neo-Scholastic Essays collects some of Feser’s academic papers from the last ten years on themes in metaphysics and philosophy of nature, natural theology, philosophy of mind, and ethics. 

Fingerhut, Bruce
Passover Haggadah for Christians, A
A Passover Haggadah for Christians

Over the past few decades an increasing number of Christians have sought to celebrate the Last Supper, which was a Passover seder, as a way of better understanding Easter. Several Passover haggadahs aimed at Christians are presently on the market. But all have sought to celebrate the Passover outside of the context of the Old Testament itself. The seders resulting from using these haggadahs are rewrites of the authentic haggadahs and do not recapture either the usage that the Jewish people have experienced throughout the ages or the Last Supper that Jesus celebrated with his Disciples.. 

Fisher, Anthony, O.P. and Gormally, Luke, editors
Healthcare Allocation
Healthcare Allocation

This volume argues that there is a need for an alternative to prevailing understandings of the ethical requirements which healthcare allocation policy should meet. It offers a detailed critique both of liberal-welfarist and utilitarian approaches to healthcare allocation. The authors maintain that an ethically adequate approach to resource allocation in healthcare must be based on specific ('contentfull') understandings of the human person, of human needs, of human community and the common good, and of the nature of healthcare. Only if policy is informed by such understandings can it avoid serious injustice to patients and the abandonment of values essential to healthcare practice. The volume details the normative requirements allocation policy should meet, and highlights injustices which are encouraged by current tendencies in policy, reinforced by decisions in the courts.

Fitzpatrick, F. J.
Ethics in Nursing Practice
Ethics in Nursing Practice

“This book goes a considerable way towards filling a gap which Christian nurses may become aware of when studying ethics i.e. a clear exposition of a Christian perspective on ethical issues affecting nursing.” – Dorothy Whyte, Ethics and Medicine

Flaumenhaft, Harvey
Insights and Manipulations
Insights and Manipulations

The past becomes a source of wisdom when the scientific quest for uncovering the roots of things is combined with the humanistic endeavor to make the dead letter come alive in a thoughtful mind. Vague attempts at being “interdisciplinary,” by contrast, merely provide excuses to avoid examining the words set down by the scientific thinkers themselves. If we love wisdom in its wholeness, we must explore the sources of the things that we now take for granted: we must think through the records of the thinking that has demarcated the various fields of study and envisioned what’s to be investigated within them and how it’s to be done.

Flew, Antony
Hume's Philosophy of Belief
Hume's Philosophy of Belief

Stresses the importance of Hume’s An Inquiry concerning Human Understanding not only as a philosophical text in its own right, but also as the starting point for developing an understanding of broader philosophical issues. Flew takes in such modern thinkers as Peirce, Wittgenstein, Frege, and Ryle. First published in 1961, this is a reprint of the corrected 1966 edition.

Foy, John
Night Vision
Night Vision

In John Foy's Night Vision, wars go on in the Middle East, violence is never far away, and the creatures of the field are “much the worse / for having been beneath the rotor blades.” Written in an uncluttered idiom, these poems, technically adept, play across a range of forms in a voice that stands out for its bitter clarity and directness. They are by turns contemplative and savage, invoking Meister Eckhart but acknowledging that “we die like dogs in the deep snow.” If they offer solace at all, it’s in a plainspoken, dark humor. The result is an emotional immediacy unique in American poetry.

Fulvio Di Blasi
God and the Natural Law
God and the Natural Law

It seems that to have credibility in the post-Kantian and analytical world, contemporary natural-law theory wants to show its independence both from God and from human nature. But can there be a natural-law theory without the "natural" – not grounded on the facts of nature – and without "law" – not in need of a Legislator? In God and the Natural Law, Fulvio Di Blasi, starts with an original analysis of the current debate in ethics, jurisprudence, and politics in order to give the background for a sound understanding of the concept of natural law, which sets the stage for the heart of the book: a recovery of the authentic meaning of the two main concepts of classical natural law theory as synthesized by Thomas Aquinas – the will of God and the order of nature.

Fustel de Coulanges, Numa
Ancient City, The
The Ancient City

The importance of engaging the problems of contemporary political theory has brought us to an unprecedented reliance on the historical commentary already provided by giants like Alexis de Tocqueville and Edmund Burke. Among these is also the less often noted Numa Denis Fustel de Coulanges and his landmark work, The Ancient City.

Gaboriau, Florent
Conversion of Edith Stein, The
The Conversion of Edith Stein

One fateful day Edith Stein took from a friend’s bookshelf the autobiography of Saint Teresa of Avila. In it she found the simple truth about human existence. Shortly afterward, she became a Catholic, but her desire to become a Carmelite like Teresa was delayed for some time. Eventually she entered the convent in Cologne. Because of the Nazi persecution of Jews, converted or not, endangered others in her convent, she ask to be moved to a convent in the Netherlands. The German armies of occupation soon followed. It was from the Carmelite convent at Echt that she was taken in 1942, shipped to Auschwitz and executed.

Geach, Peter
Mental Acts
Mental Acts

Geach insists, in opposition to the behaviorism of the day, that there are episodic mental acts such as acts of judgment. How to characterize such mental acts remains as problematic as it was fifty years ago, and his book still has much to teach us. He begins with an attack on the abstractionist theory of concept-formation, then goes on to criticize the relational theory of judgment propounded by Bertrand Russell. Moving from criticism to construction, Geach first offers an improved version of Russell’s analysis, then moves on to offer an alternative of his own.

“Mr. Geach has written a splendid book, which deserves to be read by every serious student of the philosophy of mind.” – Alan Donagan, Philosophical Review

Geach, Peter
God and the Soul
God and the Soul

This collection of nine papers brings together Many of Geach’s thoughts on such wide topics as resurrection, deductive proof of the existence of God, God’s role in ethics, materialism, and the relation of time and prayer. The first three papers are concerned with the survival of death and what form such a survival might take. This includes Geach’s argument against materialism in “What Do We Think With?” Two further papers are concerned with arguments about existence, and the remaining papers concern natural theology.

Gelven, Michael
Judging Hope
Judging Hope

This work studies hope as a phenomenon that both reveals and belongs to our status of being human. To understand that status, we must understand what it means to hope, which profoundly surpasses both psychological wish or desire and the “merely religious” belief in salvation. The author looks at hope in all its concrete manifestation: He examines works of art, some of which depict hope in unflattering terms as delusional, while others see it as dangerous and elusive; he examines the work of Kant, who saw hope as among the three interests of reason itself (the others being cognition and morality); he examines false hope as that which confuses intensity of desire for a specific boon as an actual cause of the boon; he points to the metaphors of hope (light and darkness as congruents of revealing/concealing; or the two forms of light itself: illumination, or hope for, versus radiation, or hope in (to trust).

Gerdil, H. S.
Anti-Emile, The
The Anti-Emile

“In his Emile Rousseau proposes a new plan of education closely connected with a universal overthrow of civil order. The goal of the Emile is to prepare souls by means of a total revolution in their modes of thinking.”—These words were penned in 1763, by the young Catholic philosopher, H. S. Gerdil, more than two decades before the French revolution. In a prophetic moment in the history of the philosophy of education, Gerdil noted that the pedagogy of Rousseau’s book will inspire “vexation with and aversion for religious and social institutions . . . it will make bad Christians and bad citizens.” The disenchantment with any authority or social forms sunk deep roots in the modern European social imagination. It has informed the many liberal reforms of education of the last two centuries. The Emile is still with us.

Gilson, Étienne
Theology and the Cartesian Doctrine of Freedom
Theology and the Cartesian Doctrine of Freedom

Theology and the Cartesian Doctrine of Freedom, now for the first time available in English, was Étienne Gilson’s doctoral thesis and part of a larger project to show the medieval roots of Descartes at a time when the very existence of medieval philosophy was often ignored.

Gilson, Étienne
Tribulations of Sophia, The
The Tribulations of Sophia

The heart of the book is entitled, “Three Lectures on Thomism and its Current Situation.” During the Second Vatican Council and its immediate aftermath, the status of Thomism in Catholic intellectual circles and institutions was vigorously challenged. Once again, the problem of Thomism emerges: What is Thomism and where does it belong? Gilson’s devotion to elaborating the nature of Christian philosophy compels him to confront this question head-on. Indeed, because Gilson approaches Thomism as the veritable model for Christian philosophy he cannot ignore the attempts to suppress or supplant it.

 

Girard, René
Theater of Envy, A
A Theater of Envy

In this ground-breaking work, one of our foremost literary and cultural critics turns to the major figure in English literature, William Shakespeare, and proposes a dramatic new reading of nearly all his plays and poems. The key to A Theater of Envy is Girard’s novel reinterpretation of "mimesis." For Girard, people desire objects not for their intrinsic value, but because they are desired by someone else – we mime or imitate their desires. This envy – or "mimetic desire" – he sees as one of the foundations of the human condition.

Bringing such proocative and iconoclastic insights to bear on Shakespeare, Girard reveals the previously overlooked coherence of problem plays like Troilus and Cressida, and makes a convincing argument for elevating A Midsummer Night’s Dream from the status of a chaotic comedy to a masterpiece. The book abounds with novel and provocative interpretations: Shakespeare becomes "a prophet of modern advertising," and the threat of nuclear disaster is read in the light of Hamlet. Most intriguing of all, perhaps, is a brief, but brilliant aside in which an entirely new perspective is brought to the chapter on Joyce’s Ulysses in which Stephen Dedalus gives a lecture on Shakespeare. In Girard’s view only Joyce, perhaps the greatest of twentieth-century novelists, comes close to  understanding the greatest of Renaissance playwrights.

Throughout this impressively sustained reading of Shakespeare, Girard’s prose is sophisticated, but contemporary, and accessible to the general reader.

Godfrey-Howell, Catherine
Consensual Incapacity to Marry
Consensual Incapacity to Marry

The question of consensual incapacity is asked tens of thousands of times each year anew and there is not yet a definitive study that provides answers and guidance for further development of this notion. Another example of the longevity of this work: the manual it will effectively replace was in print for twenty years with five editions (L. Wrenn, 1970, CUA).

Goerner, Edward A.
Peter and Caesar
Peter and Caesar

Started before the Second Vatican Council opened and completed and published shortly before it closed, Peter and Caesar is more radical than the Council was or could be in two major and seemingly opposed directions. They seemed opposed from the perspective of the conventional opposition of liberal and conservative tendencies in the church.

Gormally, Luke, editor
Culture of Life, Culture of Death
Culture of Life, Culture of Death

A gathering of some of the best scholars in traditional Catholic thinking to discuss the culture of life: Luke Gormally, “Introduction”; Cardinal Thomas J Winning, “The Great Jubilee and the Culture of Life, the Culture of Death”; John Finnis, “Secularism, the Root of the Culture of Death”; Katerina Fedoryka Cuddeback, “The Global Lineaments of the Culture of Death”; Dermot Fenlon, “Dechristianizing England: Newman, Mill and the Stationary State”; Robert George, “The Political Theory of the Culture of Death”; Livio Melina, “Faith in the Incarnation, Death and Resurrection of Jesus and the Culture of Life”; Carlo Lorenzo Rossetti, “What Does It Mean for a Christian to Be ‘Against the world but for the World’?”; Bishop Donal Murray, “The Church as a Community of Hope in the Face of the Culture of Death”; Archbishop George Pell, “The Role of the Bishop in Promoting the Gospel of Life”; Richard Hogan, “The Role of the Priest in Promoting the Culture of Life”; Laura Garcia, “The Family and the Culture of Life”; Anthony Fisher, OP, “Some Problems of Conscience in Bio-Lawmaking”; Jorge Garcia, “The Forms and Limits of the Private Defence of Innocent Human.”

Gormally, Luke, editor
Issues for a Catholic Bioethic
Issues for a Catholic Bioethic

“It conveys predictably that Catholic bioethics has as much concern with philosophical issues about body and soul as it has to do with medical casuistry. Less predictably it offers some welcome indications that current Catholic discussion is biblically, as well as philosophically formed: a rather good section called ‘Anthropology’ contains two memorable essays, one by Professor John Haldane on the philosophy of the body and one by Gregory Glazov on biblical anthropology. There are discussions of sexual ethics (with especial reference to John-Paul II’s allocutions) as well as of the vocation of health care and the vocation to suffer. But there is attention to practical questions, too. Six contributions concern themselves with the relation of Catholic medical practice to the norms of contemporary secular society, and especially the problem of cooperation in evil, an understandable preoccupation.” – Oliver O’Donovan, New Blackfriars

Gormally, Luke, editor
Euthanasia, Clinical Practice and the Law
Euthanasia, Clinical Practice and the Law

“This book is a wonderful antidote for anyone tempted to despair of the obfuscation, duplicity and just plain muddleheadedness of many of the participants in the public debate about euthanasia. . . . If you are interested in the debate over euthanasia (and none of us can afford not to be) beg, borrow or buy this book.” – Karin Clark, News Weekly

 

Green, George
Lord Byron's Foot
Lord Byron's Foot

George Green is a pop-culture Juvenal, whose satiric strain is both trenchant and elegiac. The poems in Lord Byron’s Foot move deftly between the back alleys of Trieste and the parking lots of his hometown in Pennsylvania, between Chichester Cathedral and the downtown streets and parks of Manhattan where he has lived for three decades. Green’s range and depth of knowledge in these technically accomplished poems might be intimidating if not for the disarming delight and passion with which he engages his material and the bizarrely raucous humor in which the poetry often revels.

Greene, Robert
Death and Life of Philosophy, The
The Death and Life of Philosophy

For almost the entire twentieth century, the discipline of philosophy has been unable to define its proper role in Academe and in the contemporary world. Trapped by the dilemmas that have plagued modern philosophy since Descartes, it has fallen on evil days. In this provocative and controversial book, Robert Greene kills off philosophy in its present ill-conceived skeptical form. Using an updated version of Aristotle’s ideas, particularly his psychology, Greene shows how easily the dilemmas of modern philosophy can be solved and philosophy revived and re-connected with the many disciplines from which it is estranged. The momentum of change, Greene predicts, will be so great that an intellectual revolution will occur that will rejuvenate Academe.