Title

"Comprehensive Judgment" and "Absolute Selflessness"
"Comprehensive Judgment" and "Absolute Selflessness"

Histories and biographies of Winston Churchill frequently mention his friends. Some comment on their importance but few explain their significance. Indeed, he rarely spoke of his friendships. However, his concern for friends and for friendship always seems to hover above, or in the background, of his statecraft and in his thinking about statecraft and politics. This book brings friendship into focus as a central component of Churchill’s understanding of politics and statesmanship.

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Aborting Aristotle
Aborting Aristotle

The abortion debate has returned. More than forty years have passed since the landmark decision Roe v. Wade, which legalized abortion in the United States. But the abortion debate continues to rage among ethicists and the influencers of society in politics, government, and the arts. Dave Sterrett’s Aborting Aristotle examines these essential differences philosophically, while investigating the naturalistic worldview about humanity that is frequently held by many of the scholarly defenders of abortion.

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Abortion
Abortion

Introduction: Reasons for abortion. Methods of abortion. Effects on women. The Church and Abortion: The Bible. Christian tradition. Recent Church statements. Non-religious Arguments: Being a person. Having an interest. Stages of development. The start of life. Identical twinning. Human potential. Bodily rights. Responsibility for children. Prenatal tests. Unwanted children. Ectopic pregnancy. Responding to Abortion: Backstreet abortion. ‘Imperfect’ legislation. Doctors and nurses. Promotion of abortion. Social action. Further Reading. Church Documents. Glossary.

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Achilles and Hector
Achilles and Hector

Seth Benardete's study of the Iliad, which initiated his scholarly career, bears the hallmarks of the unique turn of mind that characterized all his later work. In a brief Note written thirty years later, included in this volume, he looks back on what he sees as the limits of his original reading of the Iliad. Yet he seems to have been aware of the fundamental problems from early on that he wrestled with explicitly when he returned to Homer some forty years later: the question of the relations among gods, fate, and human choice, which lies at the core of his late "Platonic reading" of the Odyssey, is already guiding his understanding of the Iliad. And he saw, in working out that understanding, how those relations take on a very distinct form for the tragic hero in contrast with the comic hero – Achilles in contrast with Odysseus.

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The Actor and the Spectator
Actor and the Spectator, The

Can a machine think? More pointedly, if I am a machine, can I think? Beck answers these questions by analyzing two clusters of metaphors – one of which dramatizes human beings as spontaneous agents (actors), and the other sees them as observers attempting to explain causally their own behavior and that of the actor (spectators). Using a hypothetical scene with two spectators, each explaining an action, and each representing a different way of viewing the world, Beck points up the central philosophical problems raised by the varieties of ways in which we explain our own actions and those of others.

“[F]ull of insights and fruitful suggestions.” – Stephan Körner, TLS

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Advent Meditations
Advent Meditations

Wonderful daily meditations for the Season of Advent to guide you through each day to help you “Wait in Joyful Hope.”

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The Aesthetic Understanding
Aesthetic Understanding, The

New and revised edition, with three new essays.

Brings together essays on the philosophy of art in which a philosophical theory of aesthetic judgment is tested and developed through its application to particular examples. Each essay approaches, from its own field of study, what Roger Scruton argues to be the central problems of aesthetics – what is aesthetic experience, and what is its importance for human conduct?

New essays in this edition include “The Aesthetic Endeavour Today,” “Upon Nothing” (a deconstruction of deconstruction), and “Humane Education.”

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After 40 Years
After 40 Years

After Forty Years: Vatican Council II’s Diverse Legacy, as the title indicates, commemorates the 40th anniversary of the Second Vatican Council of 1962–1965. However, the book makes no attempt to deal with the legacy of Vatican II as a whole, that is, with the Council’s complete legacy, but only with some important parts of it. The Council as a whole represents a topic too vast to be covered within the confines of a single volume, as it was too vast to be covered within the confines of a single Fellowship of Catholic Scholars convention. This book covers those aspects of the Council that were of special interest to some of the leading scholars and academics active in the Fellowship. These favored topics were covered by means of the scholarly papers prepared especially for the Fellowship’s annual convention held in Charlotte, North Carolina, in September 2005. This book deals with the two great Constitutions on the Church (Lumen Gentium and Gaudium et Spes); its epochal Constitution on Divine Revelation, and hence also on Scripture (Dei Verbum); its Declaration on Religious Liberty (Dignitatis Humanae); and its Decree on Ecumenism (Unitatis Redintegratio). Because of the special interest of a number of the contributors, there is a heavy emphasis on the meaning and significance of the “anthropology” of Gaudium et Spes (the favorite Vatican II document of Pope John Paul II, by the way, who was one of the architects of this document at the Council). This book, however, is no superficial survey of the general ideas and thrust of the Second Vatican Council, as so many books on the subject turn out to be; but it is rather an in-depth look at the meaning an import of several of the Council’s most important themes and decisions. As is usual with the books based on Fellowship conventions, the volume contains a number of outstanding contributors, including Jesuit Father William S. Kurz of Marquette, Sister Mary Timothy Prokes, f.s.e., of the Notre Dame Graduate School of Christendom College, and New York University’s Emeritus Professor of Psychology, Dr. Paul Vitz, now teaching at the new Institute for Psychological Sciences (IPS) in Northern Virginia.

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After Wittgenstein, St. Thomas
After Wittgenstein, St. Thomas

In this slender volume Roger Pouivet advances an arresting argument. He asserts that the work of the later Wittgenstein can help us discern the lasting value of Thomas Aquinas’s philosophical anthropology. He also holds that Aquinas can
help the reader avoid an influential misreading of Wittgenstein. Pouivet draws on the work of Elizabeth Anscombe, Peter Geach, and Anthony Kenny to advance this twofold argument.

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Agnosticism
Agnosticism

Until the nineteenth century, thinkers who entertained doubts about the existence of God were branded “atheists” and “infidels,” and were subject to persecutions. But in the late nineteenth-century Britain a group of highly respectable thinkers emerged who argued for the radical conclusion that theology is impossible, and that we humans cannot know what, if anything, lies behind the veil of appearances. This volume provides extracts of the best-known agnostics (Spencer, Huxley, Stephen, Clifford, and Tyndall), and their less well-known theological opponents. The debate marks a major turning point in Western attitudes toward religious belief; the burden of proof was henceforth firmly placed on the shoulders of the theologians.

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All Nature Is a Sacramental Fire
All Nature Is a Sacramental Fire

The Lord God Creator has given us five openings to the physical world around us, that sacramental world in which we swim: hearing, sight, taste, touch, and smell. The experience of each of these senses is sometimes sharp and clean; poignant, evocative, almost unendurable. In the lines of this collection, penned during sixty years, Michael Novak has sought to snatch from the flames of rushing time a few simple pieces, shards, remainders. “All Nature is a Heraclitean Fire,” a real poet wrote. Novak calls himself an amateur. But one who believes, however, that everybody should write poetry, or reach for it. It is the language of our soul. It is concentrated prose.

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Allergic to Crazy
Allergic to Crazy

Allergic to Crazy features a stunningly diverse array of brief reflections by one of America’s leading public intellectuals. Each of these short, pointed, and witty essays applies the wisdom of postmodern conservatism to the issues that rightly occupy so much of life these days.

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America's Spiritual Capital
America's Spiritual Capital

Spiritual capital is the fund of beliefs, examples, and commitments that are transmitted from generation to generation through a religious tradition, and which attach people to the transcendent source of fulfillment and happiness. America has created the greatest civilization the world has ever known, and it has done this because of its spiritual capital, the values and beliefs by which individual Americans have interpreted and transformed the world. The Judeo-Christian heritage has historically served as the spiritual capital of America.

WATCH NEWSMAX.TV'S INTERVIEW WITH CO-AUTHOR, THEODORE ROOSEVELT MALLOCH HERE.

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The American Catholic Voter
American Catholic Voter, The

From the earliest days in the New World through the disputed presidential election of 2000, the influence of Catholics on American politics has followed a peculiar arc. In Colonial America, Catholics were often denied participation in the process; but in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the Catholic bloc was recognized as a swing vote that determined the outcome of numerous elections; and today Catholics are either so assimilated or disunited that as a group their impact is declining.

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American Heresies and Higher Education
American Heresies and Higher Education

These closely interrelated essays explore who we think we are and what we believe we’re supposed to do as free and relational persons these days.

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The Anchors in the Heavens
Anchors in the Heavens, The

What Brague offers us here is not a narrative of decline, not a Jeremiad, not a nostalgic lament for the thought-world of a bygone era, but a sympathetic outline of some of the major tensions in the philosophical underpinnings of the modernity that we all inhabit. As such, it forms a part of his ongoing effort take modernity “more seriously than it takes itself”, to expose its hidden foundations, and to push it to its logical conclusions. In so doing, he hopes to help clarify where it is that we are going as a species, and to ensure that wherever it is, there is room for us humans in it.

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The Ancients and the Moderns
Ancients and the Moderns, The

In this insightful and controversial book, Rosen takes a new look at the famous "quarrel" that the moderns have with the ancients, analyzing and comparing ancient philosophers and modern Continental and analytical thinkers from Plato, Descartes, and Kant to Fichte, Nietzsche, and Rorty. He urges that we not dismiss the classical heritage but appropriate it, for this appropriation is an indispensable step in the process of legitimizing our historical experience.

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The Anti-Emile
Anti-Emile, The

“In his Emile Rousseau proposes a new plan of education closely connected with a universal overthrow of civil order. The goal of the Emile is to prepare souls by means of a total revolution in their modes of thinking.”—These words were penned in 1763, by the young Catholic philosopher, H. S. Gerdil, more than two decades before the French revolution. In a prophetic moment in the history of the philosophy of education, Gerdil noted that the pedagogy of Rousseau’s book will inspire “vexation with and aversion for religious and social institutions . . . it will make bad Christians and bad citizens.” The disenchantment with any authority or social forms sunk deep roots in the modern European social imagination. It has informed the many liberal reforms of education of the last two centuries. The Emile is still with us.

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The Apocalypse of Being
Apocalypse of Being, The

Heidegger intended to replace metaphysics by a new kind of thought about that which he called Sein, but in his works this noun is very far from meaning the act of being such as it has been traditionally conceived by Western philosophy. His explanations as to what he does mean by Sein underline his departure from traditional metaphysics. Sein is no longer to be understood as the act of the things that exist in the eternal world, but as something revealed to the human mind in an esoteric way. The association of this esoteric revelation of Sein with Hölderlin's theosophy led Heidegger to put forward a new gnosis organized as a substitute of metaphysics and of Christian theology as well.

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Aquinas on Crime
Aquinas on Crime

Not much escapes the intellect and imagination of the Angelic Doctor, St. Thomas Aquinas. Whether it be love, children, education, moral reasoning, happiness or the proper dispositions for human existence, St. Thomas seems an expert in all of it. Crime and criminal conduct are no exceptions to this general tendency with him. Not only does he have much to say about it, what he relates is perpetually fresh and surely the bedrock of what is now taken for granted. In this short treatise, the focus targets St. Thomas’s criminal codification – his law of crimes.

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Aquinas's Neoplatonism in the Summa Theologiae on God
Aquinas's Neoplatonism in the Summa Theologiae on God

This book rises out of Dr. Wayne Hankey’s 2015 Aquinas Lecture at the University of Dallas. It explains the Neoplatonic structure and doctrine of St. Thomas’s treatment of God in the Summa theologiae with the aim of showing that his doctrine of being is at root both Trinitarian and incarnational.

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Aquinas's Sources
Aquinas's Sources

The twenty-six works contained in this collection comprise some of the best and best-known scholars on the thought of Thomas Aquinas. Readers will find here helpful insights into St. Thomas’s adjudication of various streams in the philosophical and theological traditions. Most pertinent for readers today is the way in which Aquinas integrates faith and reason, resulting in mutual benefit.. 

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The Archaeology of the Soul
Archaeology of the Soul, The

The Archaeology of the Soul is a testimony to the extraordinary scope of Seth Benardete’s thought. Some essays concern particular authors or texts; others range more broadly and are thematic. Some deal explicitly with philosophy; others deal with epic, lyric, andtragic poetry. Some of these authors are Greek, some Roman, and still others are contemporaries writing about antiquity. All of these essays, however, are informed by an underlying vision, which is a reflection of Benardete’s life-long engagement with one thinker in particular – Plato.

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Aristotle on Poetics
Aristotle <em> On Poetics </em>

Aristotle's much-translated On Poetics is the earliest and arguably the best treatment that we possess of tragedy as a literary form. Seth Benardete and Michael Davis have translated it anew with a view to rendering Aristotle’s text into English as precisely as possible. A literal translation has long been needed, for in order to excavate the argument of On Poetics one has to attend not simply to what is said on the surface but also to the various puzzles, questions, and peculiarities that emerge only on the level of how Aristotle says what he says and thereby leads one to revise and deepen one’s initial understanding of the intent of the argument. As On Poetics is about how tragedy ought to be composed, it should not be surprising that it turns out to be a rather artful piece of literature in its own right.

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Aristotle as Teacher
Aristotle as Teacher

This book is an account of Aristotle’s Metaphysics. The work is considered as a whole and each of its parts or books is taken up in the order that it has in the traditional text. The book is based on an examination of all of the manuscript readings reported in the three most recent editions of the work (those of Christ, Ross, and Jaeger), and it attempts in this way and others to come as close as possible to what would have been the original text. The Metaphysics is of course a much-studied work. What distinguishes this new effort to understand it is the working assumption that Aristotle presents in it his most comprehensive reflection on science: its character and aims, its foundations or presuppositions, and the obstacles or objections that constitute a challenge to its possibility.

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Aristotle on the Many Senses of Priority
Aristotle on the Many Senses of Priority

Discusses the origin, development, and use of the many senses of priority as a central thesis in Aristotle’s metaphysics, and argues that the concept of priority is central to understanding Aristotle’s ambiguous relationship in Platonism.

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Aristotle's Gradations of Being in Metaphysics E-Z
Aristotle's Gradations of Being in <em> Metaphysics </em> E-Z

Gradations of Being was edited from the papers of Joseph Owens. Some fifty years after his groundbreaking book The Doctrine of Being in the Aristotelian Metaphysics, Owens turned again to consider the central themes in Aristotle’s conception of a science of being or “first philosophy.” Reflecting on a half-century of scholarship, and drawing on his own extensive publications in Greek and medieval philosophy, Owens sets forth in a step-by-step meticulous argument his own interpretation of Aristotle’s account of substance, essence, and the gradations of being. Owens writes extensively of the different but complimentary approaches of Aristotle and Thomas Aquinas. He discusses the many facets of the Aristotelian notion of “form,” including its role in a realistic epistemology.

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The Ark, the Covenant, and the Poor Men's Chest
Ark, the Covenant, and the Poor Men's Chest, The

What role did Humanism play in the emergence of English Protestantism? This question has remained a live issue for Reformation scholarship over the past four centuries. In the Ark, the Covenant, and the Poor Men’s Chest, the author examines the issue in detail, utilizing categories drawn from the research of John W. O’Malley on the application of different modes of classical rhetoric to biblical interpretation during the Renaissance.

 

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Art and Imagination
Art and Imagination

This book presents a theory of aesthetic judgment and appreciation in the spirit of modern empiricism. There are three parts: the first deals with questions of philosophical logic, the second with questions in the philosophy of mind, and the third with questions in the philosophy of art. Thus the argument advances from a theory of aesthetic judgment (and in particular of “aesthetic description”), to a theory of aesthetic appreciation, and thence to an account of the nature and value of art.

“This is an important book and one of the best to appear in a long while.” – B. R. Tilghman, Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism               

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At a Breezy Time of Day
At a Breezy Time of Day

As the title of this collection intimates, we begin with the very first interview in the Garden of Eden. We touch many places and issues. The interview always has somewhere even in its written form the touch of the human voice. The one who interviews invites us to speak, to tell us what we hold, why we hold it. Interviews are themselves part of that engagement in conversation that defines our kind in its search for a full knowledge of what is.

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Atomism and Its Critics
Atomism and Its Critics

A substantial and in-depth study of the history of the atomic theory of matter between the time of Democritus and that of Newton. It is the first to emphasize the continuity of the atomic debate and the debt owed by the seventeenth-century “moderns” to the medieval critique of Aristotle. 

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Augustinian-Cartesian Index
Augustinian-Cartesian Index

Since the publication of Etienne Gilson’s magisterial study, La Liberté chez Descartes et la théologie, in 1913, Cartesian scholars have been trying to determine the extent of Augustine’s influence on Descartes. Zbigniew Janowski’s Augustinian-Cartesian Index brings what seems to be a definitive answer. In his Index Janowski shows page by page, in Latin and in the English translation, the passages in the Meditations that find their counterparts in the Augustinian corpus. In his meticulous commentary the author analyzes Augustine’s role in the formation and development of Descartes’s philosophy. There are also two appendixes with borrowings from Thomas Aquinas and Bacon, and a short essay on the role Bacon played in the transformation of Cartesian metaphysics. TheAugustinian-Cartesian Index is a major contribution to the understanding of the origins of modern philosophy and Augustinian tradition in the seventeenth century. It will become a standard reference tool.

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Averroes' Middle Commentaries on Aristotle's Categories and De Interpretatione
Averroes' Middle Commentaries on Aristotle's <em> Categories </em> and <em> De Interpretatione </em>

“Students of the Aristotelian tradition in medieval philosophy will welcome the excellent English translations of Averroes’ commentaries on these two works of Aristotle.” – Mohamed Alibhai, Religious Studies Review

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Averroes' Middle Commentary on Aristotle's Poetics
Averroes' Middle Commentary on Aristotle's <em> Poetics </em>

This volume contains both the translation of the text and an introduction which the arguments of both Averroes and Aristotle are sketch out and their differences from Plato and other important thinkers explored, an outline analysis of the order of Averroes’s commentary, annotations to the text, a bibliography, and a glossary of important terms with their English translations..

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Back to the Drawing Board
Back to the Drawing Board

Back to the Drawing Board: The Future of the Pro-Life Movement is an unprecedented collection of thoughtful and sometimes painfully honest essays, evaluating the pro-life cause thirty years after Roe v. Wade. Contributing writers are the movement's most respected leaders, including Dr. James Dobson, Fr. Richard John Neuhaus, Nat Hentoff, Dr. Mildred Jefferson, Congressman Chris Smith, Phyllis Schlafly, Rabbi Daniel Lapin, Paul Weyrich, and Jean Garton, among others. They are statesmen, scholars, doctors, lawyers, judges, activists and mothers. They are Evangelical Christian, Muslim, Atheist, Jewish, and Catholic. They are men and women, young and old, liberal and conservative, Democrat and Republican – and third party. Many are veterans, some are new; but all have labored in the effort, and care about its future.

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Ballet Parking
Ballet Parking

The Nutcracker began as a German fairy tale. It then became a Russian ballet, and now, in its latest incarnation, it has become an American ritual. Every year mothers from the suburbs surrounding South Bend, Indiana, set out in their vans and SUVs to slay the rat king in a military campaign against the rats and everything they symbolize. Every year they volunteer their little boys and girls as soldiers in the culture wars so that they can defeat the rats of appetite, disorder, and chaos by wielding the weapons of truth, beauty, and grace. The Nutcracker is the 21st-century version of the Children’s Crusade.

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Baseball and Memory
Baseball and Memory

In this historical/philosophical reflection, Lee Congdon writes of the ways in which baseball spurs memory. This is particularly important at a time when many Americans suffer from a form of amnesia that renders them defenseless in the face of concerted efforts to seize possession of the past. “Who controls the past controls the future,” George Orwell wrote in Nineteen Eighty-Four, “who controls the present controls the past.” Baseball can, and does, stand in the way of those whose ambition it is to gain and maintain power by pretending that memory cannot be trusted; what was once thought to be “the past” was merely a fiction that served the interests of a ruling class.

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Basics of Semiotics
Basics of Semiotics

"Deely's book, the only successful modern English introduction to semiotics, is a clear, creative, and provocative synthesis of major trends, past and present." - Thomas A. Sebeok, Indiana University

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The Battle for the Catholic Mind
Battle for the Catholic Mind, The

A Selection of outstanding articles from the Fellowship’s first thirteen years of Proceedings.

Contributors include Germain Grisez, Msgr. George A. Kelly, Paul C. Vitz, Joseph M. Boyle, Rev. Ronald Lawler, OFM CAP., John M. Finnis, James Hitchcock, Maura A. Daly, R. V. Young, John M. Haas, Robert P. George, Joyce A. Little, Benedict M. Ashley, O.P., Alice Ramos, Rev. Marvin R. O’Connell, Janet E. Smith, Gerard V. Bradley, and Rev. Robert Sokolowski.

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The Baylor Project
Baylor Project, The

[T]he earlier and much-anticipated version [of this book], entitled Baylor Beyond the Crossroads: An Interpretive History, 1985–2005, was in the printing process when its publication was cancelled. The first several hundred copies of the book were then destroyed. The earlier version was cancelled because the new administration at Baylor believed the publication of the book under the Baylor name would unnecessarily involve it, the administration, in the prolonged controversy that had enveloped Baylor at least since the 2001 adoption of Baylor 2012 – Baylor’s sweeping vision to be a Christian research university.

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Beauteous Truth
Beauteous Truth

Beauteous Truth explores the inextricable connection between the Good, the True and the Beautiful. It is a book that makes the necessary connections between faith and reason and between theology, philosophy, history and literature. It presents a panoramic overview of Western Civilization, from Homer to Tolkien, and highlights the importance of the great figures of the Catholic cultural revival, including Newman, Wilde, Chesterton, Belloc, and C.S. Lewis. Ranging from Shakespeare to Solzhenitsyn, Beauteous Truth celebrates the marriage of sanity and sanctity, which is the fruit of the indissoluble union of fides et ratio.

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Bergson
Bergson

Kolakowski shows how Henri Bergson sought to reconcile Darwin’s theory with his own beliefs about the nature of the universe. Bergson believed that time could be thought of in two different ways: as an abstract measuring device used for practical purposes, or as durée, the “real” time we actually experience. He also held that all matter is propelled by an internal élan vital, or life-drive, and that the life of the universe is constantly creative and unpredictable. On the basis of these ideas he constructed a system of thought that embraced his views on memory, matter, consciousness, movement, religious morality, and the nature of laughter. His pantheistic and dynamic vision of the universe, which emerged at a time of crisis in Western intellectual life, was symptomatic of the struggle between a rigid scientific determinism and the Christian tradition of a divine creation.

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Bertrand Russell
Bertrand Russell

In addition to being one of the most important logicians and philosophers of this century, Russell was also one of its most prominent public figures, and his influence on his time was not confined to academic subjects. This book deals with Russell’s work on the foundation of mathematics and to the philosophical method that he developed as a consequence of his successes in that field, but there are also examples of the more popular side of his work, with discussions of positions he defended in the philosophy of religion, political philosophy, history, and education, and one of the dominant hemes of his life, political activism.

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Bertrand Russell and the Origins of Analytical Philosophy
Bertrand Russell and the Origins of Analytical Philosophy

This collection of new essays from distinguished philosophers and Russell scholars explores Russell’s own unique and enduringly important contribution to shaping the concerns and the methods of contemporary analytical philosophers. It includes both general discussions of the nature of analytical philosophy and minutely detailed analyses of Russell’s own arguments, and covers the whole range of Russell’s famously varied output. Contributors include Nicholas Griffin, Peter Hylton , A. C. Grayling, C. M. Kilmister, and others.

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Between Nothingness and Paradise
Between Nothingness and Paradise

This highly relevant essay by the prominent political philosopher has as its central theme the feature common to all totalitarian ideologies, “the total critique of society” that social criticism that rejects not this or that injustice but damns the entire “system” and overshadows an entire historical period.

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Beyond Radical Secularism
Beyond Radical Secularism

This is the book that took France by storm upon its publication in the fall of 2015. It was praised by some for its rare combination of tough-mindedness and moderation and attacked by others for suggesting that radical secularism could not provide the political and spiritual resources to address the Islamic challenge. The book is even more relevant after the Parisian terror attacks of November 13, 2015. It is a book that combines permanence and relevance, that addresses a pressing political and civilizational problem in a manner that will endure.

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The Bible and the Mass
Bible and the Mass, The

A step-by-step excursion through the Mass. Fr. Stravinskas explains the parts of the Mass, giving scriptural references and explanations for the various actions and prayers. Each chapter ends with stud questions geared toward group discussion. Perfect for Bible study, theology class, or prayer group, or simply to deepen one’s own understanding of the Church’s highest form of prayer, the Eucharistic Sacrifice.

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Bibliographia Malebranchiana
Bibliographia Malebranchiana

A very complete, annotated bibliographical listing of works on the seventeenth-century philosopher, Nicolas Malebranche (1638–1715).

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Both Sides of the Altar
Both Sides of the Altar

Why would a priest turn his back on his priesthood and walk away from his religious vocation and its demanding responsibilities? Why did he become a priest in the first place? And how do such men make reparations for their defection? Both Sides of the Altar strives to look at these questions through one such priest’s life, that of Frank Morgan.

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Briefly Considered
Briefly Considered

In commenting on contemporary social and political issues, Dougherty provides a critique of the humbug that often passes as philosophy. Much of what is published as philosophy, he claims, has little to do with the pursuit of wisdom, and much is written without any knowledge of the history of philosophy – for example, a professor of moral philosophy, by his own admission, lecturing without any knowledge of the Stoics, and another professor at a prominent university, in a nationally televised series of lectures devoted to the history of philosophy, jumping from Plato to Descartes with nothing in between. Dougherty argues that the ancients, no less intelligent or observant than we, have much to say to us about nature, human nature, and the polity. It is from the vantage point of what he takes to be perennial philosophy that Dougherty discusses topics such as “The Acquisition and Use of Power,” “Property as a Condition of Liberty,” “Tolerance.” “Responsibility,” and “The Nature of Scientific Explanation.”

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